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NEWS
August 27, 2011
I was saddened to learn of the death of John Burleigh ("Civil rights activist helped organize demonstration at Gwynn Oak Park, was active in CORE," July 20). He was an unsung hero of the civil rights struggle. The purpose of this letter is to fill in some of the gaps in his obituary. I first met John in the early 1960s when he organized a demonstration that took place in front of the Social Security headquarters to protest the agency's racially discriminatory hiring and promotion practices.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
The wooden roller coaster and the Dixie Ballroom are long gone. Gone, too, from Gwynn Oak Park is the merry-go-round where a toddler in a pink dress took a historic spin on a summer afternoon a half-century ago. That simple pleasure, a first for a black child at the formerly segregated Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, had become possible just weeks earlier in 1963 when hundreds of black and white protesters thrust Baltimore into the national spotlight...
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
A Baltimore County jury found a man accused of abducting, assaulting and raping a woman in a Gwynn Oak park a decade ago guilty of seven charges Friday, including first-degree rape, robbery with a dangerous weapon and kidnapping. Rhasaan Harcum, 31, is to be sentenced March 15 by Baltimore County Circuit Judge Ruth A. Jakubowski, who presided over the four-day trial. Seven years after the Sept. 28, 2000, attack, DNA evidence led a police detective to Charnard Demon Jones, 31, and ultimately to Harcum, and both men were charged with multiple counts.
EXPLORE
By Sharon Rydell, sbrydell13@aol.comsbrydell13@aol.com | June 17, 2013
Do you remember Gwynn Oak Junction? Then you may have gone to the movies at what was the Ambassador Theatre, bought your groceries at Schreiber's, purchased your very first Halloween costume at Read's, spent your allowance at Ben Franklin, and gotten your hair styled at Dorothy's Beauty Parlor. You surely then will remember Gwynn Oak Park, just short hop down Gwynn Oak Avenue, to the corner of Gwyndale, through which ran the Gwynn Falls Creek. Once you got past ticket booth with the nasty smiling-clown's face on it , you knew you were in for an afternoon of great fun - and perhaps a little adventure.
NEWS
February 5, 2013
On Saturday, Feb. 2, Baltimore memorialized the Rev. Vernon N. Dobson and recognized him as a giant in the history of the local civil rights struggle ("Civil rights leader founded BUILD," Jan. 27). Testimony was given of his efforts to desegregate Gwynn Oak Park in 1963, creation of the Maryland Food Bank in 1968 and, in the 1970s, the founding of Baltimoreans United In Leadership Development. He was lauded for his work in planning the 1963 March on Washington and his marching with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. from Selma to Montgomery, Ala. in 1965.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 28, 2011
Only recently, with the controversy over the proposed demolition of the Read's drugstore at Howard and Lexington, are we beginning to take note of Baltimore's important and early role in the civil rights movement. A few weeks ago, a copy of a new book, "Round and Round Together," arrived with much to say. Its title refers to Gwynn Oak's merry-go-round, which the author treats as a kind of centerpiece and metaphor for the local movement of the 1950s and 1960s. I later spoke with the author, Amy Singewald Nathan, a Baltimorean from Hunting Ridge who had just graduated Western High School during the summer of 1963, when Gwynn Oak was the subject of national attention.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 17, 1998
THURSDAY, the Fourth of July, 1963, started out like every other Independence Day in Baltimore. Parades, cookouts, ballgames, fireworks and patriotic speeches were scheduled. The weather was a pleasant 78 degrees. Baltimore was on holiday.But not everybody was taking one. Before the day was over, Baltimore would be a changed city, and a new chapter in the history of Baltimore's black community would be written.About noon, about 300 people assembled at Metropolitan United Methodist Church at 1121 W. Lanvale St. The event had been organized by the local chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality, Maryland Council of Churches and the New York headquarters of Campus Americans for Democratic Action.
EXPLORE
By Sharon Rydell, sbrydell13@aol.comsbrydell13@aol.com | June 17, 2013
Do you remember Gwynn Oak Junction? Then you may have gone to the movies at what was the Ambassador Theatre, bought your groceries at Schreiber's, purchased your very first Halloween costume at Read's, spent your allowance at Ben Franklin, and gotten your hair styled at Dorothy's Beauty Parlor. You surely then will remember Gwynn Oak Park, just short hop down Gwynn Oak Avenue, to the corner of Gwyndale, through which ran the Gwynn Falls Creek. Once you got past ticket booth with the nasty smiling-clown's face on it , you knew you were in for an afternoon of great fun - and perhaps a little adventure.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
Edward A. Chance, a civil rights activist who helped lead the historic 1963 demonstrations that culminated in the integration of Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, died of cardiac arrest Thursday at his Catonsville home. He was 70. Mr. Chance was born and raised in Parmele, N.C., the son of William Claudius Chance Sr., an educator who established a school for black children, and Julia Johnson Chance, a teacher. "They set the precedent for the things that my father later became active in," said his daughter, Julia A. Chance of Brooklyn, N.Y. In 1948, his father was arrested and dragged off a southbound Atlantic Coast Line Railroad passenger train at Washington's Union Station for refusing to move to a segregated "Jim Crow" coach.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
The wooden roller coaster and the Dixie Ballroom are long gone. Gone, too, from Gwynn Oak Park is the merry-go-round where a toddler in a pink dress took a historic spin on a summer afternoon a half-century ago. That simple pleasure, a first for a black child at the formerly segregated Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, had become possible just weeks earlier in 1963 when hundreds of black and white protesters thrust Baltimore into the national spotlight...
NEWS
February 5, 2013
On Saturday, Feb. 2, Baltimore memorialized the Rev. Vernon N. Dobson and recognized him as a giant in the history of the local civil rights struggle ("Civil rights leader founded BUILD," Jan. 27). Testimony was given of his efforts to desegregate Gwynn Oak Park in 1963, creation of the Maryland Food Bank in 1968 and, in the 1970s, the founding of Baltimoreans United In Leadership Development. He was lauded for his work in planning the 1963 March on Washington and his marching with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. from Selma to Montgomery, Ala. in 1965.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 28, 2011
Only recently, with the controversy over the proposed demolition of the Read's drugstore at Howard and Lexington, are we beginning to take note of Baltimore's important and early role in the civil rights movement. A few weeks ago, a copy of a new book, "Round and Round Together," arrived with much to say. Its title refers to Gwynn Oak's merry-go-round, which the author treats as a kind of centerpiece and metaphor for the local movement of the 1950s and 1960s. I later spoke with the author, Amy Singewald Nathan, a Baltimorean from Hunting Ridge who had just graduated Western High School during the summer of 1963, when Gwynn Oak was the subject of national attention.
NEWS
August 27, 2011
I was saddened to learn of the death of John Burleigh ("Civil rights activist helped organize demonstration at Gwynn Oak Park, was active in CORE," July 20). He was an unsung hero of the civil rights struggle. The purpose of this letter is to fill in some of the gaps in his obituary. I first met John in the early 1960s when he organized a demonstration that took place in front of the Social Security headquarters to protest the agency's racially discriminatory hiring and promotion practices.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 19, 2011
John R. Burleigh 2d., a civil rights activist who had been chairman of the employment committee of the Congress of Racial Equality and retired from the city housing authority, died July 9 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Hunting Ridge resident was 86. The son of a foundryman and a homemaker, Mr. Burleigh was born in Baltimore and raised in Dorsey. He was a 1943 graduate of Wiley H. Bates High School in Annapolis, and attended Howard University in Washington.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
A Baltimore County jury found a man accused of abducting, assaulting and raping a woman in a Gwynn Oak park a decade ago guilty of seven charges Friday, including first-degree rape, robbery with a dangerous weapon and kidnapping. Rhasaan Harcum, 31, is to be sentenced March 15 by Baltimore County Circuit Judge Ruth A. Jakubowski, who presided over the four-day trial. Seven years after the Sept. 28, 2000, attack, DNA evidence led a police detective to Charnard Demon Jones, 31, and ultimately to Harcum, and both men were charged with multiple counts.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2003
Edward A. Chance, a civil rights activist who helped lead the historic 1963 demonstrations that culminated in the integration of Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, died of cardiac arrest Thursday at his Catonsville home. He was 70. Mr. Chance was born and raised in Parmele, N.C., the son of William Claudius Chance Sr., an educator who established a school for black children, and Julia Johnson Chance, a teacher. "They set the precedent for the things that my father later became active in," said his daughter, Julia A. Chance of Brooklyn, N.Y. In 1948, his father was arrested and dragged off a southbound Atlantic Coast Line Railroad passenger train at Washington's Union Station for refusing to move to a segregated "Jim Crow" coach.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 19, 2011
John R. Burleigh 2d., a civil rights activist who had been chairman of the employment committee of the Congress of Racial Equality and retired from the city housing authority, died July 9 of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Hunting Ridge resident was 86. The son of a foundryman and a homemaker, Mr. Burleigh was born in Baltimore and raised in Dorsey. He was a 1943 graduate of Wiley H. Bates High School in Annapolis, and attended Howard University in Washington.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 17, 1998
THURSDAY, the Fourth of July, 1963, started out like every other Independence Day in Baltimore. Parades, cookouts, ballgames, fireworks and patriotic speeches were scheduled. The weather was a pleasant 78 degrees. Baltimore was on holiday.But not everybody was taking one. Before the day was over, Baltimore would be a changed city, and a new chapter in the history of Baltimore's black community would be written.About noon, about 300 people assembled at Metropolitan United Methodist Church at 1121 W. Lanvale St. The event had been organized by the local chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality, Maryland Council of Churches and the New York headquarters of Campus Americans for Democratic Action.
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