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Gwyneth Paltrow

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | July 14, 2011
A few talking points: •••• Paltrow clearly dies. And gambles. We're sure this happens early in the film or it wouldn't be in the trailer. But again, Paltrow dies. That's what you get for insisting to sing "Forget You" everywhere you go. •••• Matt Damon and Jude Law - ANGRY! •••• I actually buy Kate Winslet as a scientist. Nice job, Soderbergh. •••• Thanks for reminding us that people touch their mouths and then touch everything else.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | July 14, 2011
A few talking points: •••• Paltrow clearly dies. And gambles. We're sure this happens early in the film or it wouldn't be in the trailer. But again, Paltrow dies. That's what you get for insisting to sing "Forget You" everywhere you go. •••• Matt Damon and Jude Law - ANGRY! •••• I actually buy Kate Winslet as a scientist. Nice job, Soderbergh. •••• Thanks for reminding us that people touch their mouths and then touch everything else.
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NEWS
By Maria Russo and Maria Russo,Los Angeles Times | September 30, 2008
Gwyneth Paltrow's new lifestyle/advice Web site, Goop.com, went up in preview form the other day, but the backlash is well under way. The site will be a collection of recommendations and musings from Paltrow about things that make her life special - but the road ahead looks bumpy for this little operation! It's not just that apparently no one wants to take life direction from the girl who has it all. There are also more basic technical problems, starting with the layout of the two-page site.
NEWS
By Maria Russo and Maria Russo,Los Angeles Times | September 30, 2008
Gwyneth Paltrow's new lifestyle/advice Web site, Goop.com, went up in preview form the other day, but the backlash is well under way. The site will be a collection of recommendations and musings from Paltrow about things that make her life special - but the road ahead looks bumpy for this little operation! It's not just that apparently no one wants to take life direction from the girl who has it all. There are also more basic technical problems, starting with the layout of the two-page site.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 17, 2000
Ben Affleck and Gwyneth Paltrow are so immensely appealing, and their chemistry together is so unforced, that their presence alone makes a movie worth seeing. Thankfully, "Bounce" has even more going for it. This tender, well-crafted love story about fate and love and accepting the machinations of both is a departure for writer-director Don Roos, whose last film (and first as director) was the wickedly clear-eyed black comedy "The Opposite of Sex." But it exhibits many of the traits that made the earlier film so much fun: clean dialogue, a good eye for character development and an understanding that people can surprise even themselves.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 5, 1998
"A Perfect Murder," a sleek, chic re-telling of Alfred Hitchcock's "Dial M for Murder," is an altogether respectable adaptation, taking one of the master's least compelling suspense movies and giving it a few extra twists and high gloss -- not to mention a couple of extra corpses.In fact, aside from its '90s-style ending -- which replaces psychological finesse with coarse brutality -- "A Perfect Murder" is, in many ways, better than its antecedent.In the 1954 film, Grace Kelly played a wife who has been cheating on her husband (Ray Milland)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2003
"I'm no stranger to suffering. My suffering has come from external circumstances in my life and hers from internal." -- Gwyneth Paltrow, on playing Sylvia Plath, to Associated Press Television News
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | September 2, 2008
3:30 p.m. [Comedy Central] Offbeat, quirky - that would be just a start to describe this comedy. It has Gene Hackman, Anjelica Huston, Ben Stiller, Gwyneth Paltrow, Danny Glover, Bill Murray, and Owen and Luke Wilson (right). I won't even try to summarize the plot, but part of the story concerns Luke Wilson's Richie, a former tennis star who had to quit the game after having a breakdown in the middle of a big match. So, according to the "watch it" rules I just made up, that qualifies the movie for this space.
FEATURES
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 21, 2003
View From the Top is soooooo not funny. Set up as a mild send-up of small-town girls pursuing the "glamour" of careers as flight attendants, it never comes to life. It rarely even reaches the level of cute. Gwyneth Paltrow never seems quite dumb enough to be the rube from Silver Springs, Nev., who dreams of the jet-set and that dream route, "Paris, International, First Class." Christina Applegate, cast because of what she did for Cameron Diaz in The Sweetest Thing, has the thankless role of sidekick, a fellow stewardess on the "full, upright and locked" career track.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
Oooh, Matt Damon just got a Golden Globe nomination for his performance in "The Talented Mr. Ripley." Yay, Matt! So proud of you. And you did it all without the help of your very good friend Ben Affleck. The real talent in this film, however, is Jude Law, a fine, and I mean fine, British actor who will finally get the recognition in this country he deserves. I am not a big-screen groupie. Pretty movie boys usually do nothing for me. Tom Cruise is short. Mel Gibson is hairy. James Van Der Beek is a girl.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | September 2, 2008
3:30 p.m. [Comedy Central] Offbeat, quirky - that would be just a start to describe this comedy. It has Gene Hackman, Anjelica Huston, Ben Stiller, Gwyneth Paltrow, Danny Glover, Bill Murray, and Owen and Luke Wilson (right). I won't even try to summarize the plot, but part of the story concerns Luke Wilson's Richie, a former tennis star who had to quit the game after having a breakdown in the middle of a big match. So, according to the "watch it" rules I just made up, that qualifies the movie for this space.
FEATURES
May 2, 2008
Robert Downey Jr. stars as Tony Stark, a self-absorbed munitions tycoon who is kidnapped by enemy weapons dealers and creates new-millennial armor that turns him into a superhero. Director Jon Favreau and two teams of screenwriters root Iron Man's high-flying derring-do in a change of heart that clicks first emotionally, then comedically and ultimately in both ways. Stark gains a novel slant on life that makes him see everyone from a fresh angle, including three close associates: his right-hand gal, Pepper Potts (Gwyneth Paltrow)
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 21, 2008
Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first," said Ronald Reagan. The third oldest profession must be the creation of award shows. And while we ponder the writers' strike and the end of "Hollywood" as we have known it, did anybody notice that most of the winners of the Golden Globe Awards were not notably the big talents here in the colonies? Great Britain, Australia, France and Spain triumphed with the following: best picture for the English Atonement, best movie acting awards to Julie Christie, Daniel Day-Lewis, Cate Blanchett, Marion Cotillard, Javier Bardem and two awards to the British TV drama Longford.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2006
Imagine a country where the president doesn't read the newspaper, the government goes to war for all the wrong reasons, and more votes are cast for the next pop music star than for the next president. So goes the promotional material for the new film American Dreamz, opening Friday. The film is a work of fiction, of course, though some would say just barely so. Satirizing both politics and culture, American Dreamz' premise is that we care more about melismatic singers than our nation's future.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2006
Every once in a while a fashion trend comes along that's wrong for everyone. At least that's what we've been told about big, bold horizontal stripes. "They're back, they're definitely back," says Tim Gunn, chairman of the fashion design department at Parsons the New School for Design in New York, who points out that fashion trends tend to come and go in 20-year cycles. "A horizontal stripe can be deadly," he adds darkly. Just about every kind of stripe is part of this spring's fashion story: pinstripes, sweet vertical stripes in pastel colors, seersucker, and crisp, clean preppy stripes.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 30, 2005
If you come to the movie Proof as I did, not having read or seen David Auburn's Pulitzer Prize-winning play, you may enjoy the first half as a melancholy romance streaked with humor. After all, it seems to be about a female math whiz (Gwyneth Paltrow) emerging from grief over the death of her addled math-genius dad (Anthony Hopkins) with the help of one of his former grad students (Jake Gyllenhaal). Director John Madden and the screenwriters, Auburn and Rebecca Miller, sketch in the Chicago academic-math milieu with light poetic strokes, like Gyllenhaal's belonging to a band that "plays" a three-minute silent number called "i" - for "imaginary number."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 9, 2001
Anyone can see that Shallow Hal is a one-joke movie. What makes it misfire is that its one joke clashes with its one idea. Played by Jack Black (the manic comic from High Fidelity), Hal is squat and chunky, and falls into a default look - a glare - that makes him look intense and crude, like Neanderthal man. But Hal fixates on women with the dimensions of models for the Sports llustrated swimsuit issue. Professional motivator Tony Robbins (as himself) gets stuck in an elevator with this bozo, senses that he has a good heart (how?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1998
Maybe next time you won't be in such a dang hurry to make that subway train.A distraught Helen, fresh from losing her job, does catch it, and for her trouble gets home in time to find her boyfriend in bed with another woman.Then again, Helen doesn't catch it, and arrives home late enough that the offending woman is safely on her way home, and her philandering boyfriend can keep right on philandering.So, which Helen is the lucky one?"Sliding Doors," an imaginative film from writer-director Peter Howitt, lets us see it both ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2003
"I'm no stranger to suffering. My suffering has come from external circumstances in my life and hers from internal." -- Gwyneth Paltrow, on playing Sylvia Plath, to Associated Press Television News
FEATURES
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 21, 2003
View From the Top is soooooo not funny. Set up as a mild send-up of small-town girls pursuing the "glamour" of careers as flight attendants, it never comes to life. It rarely even reaches the level of cute. Gwyneth Paltrow never seems quite dumb enough to be the rube from Silver Springs, Nev., who dreams of the jet-set and that dream route, "Paris, International, First Class." Christina Applegate, cast because of what she did for Cameron Diaz in The Sweetest Thing, has the thankless role of sidekick, a fellow stewardess on the "full, upright and locked" career track.
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