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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 16, 2007
How simultaneously wonderful and awful to be a muse! For Andy Warhol's prize protege Edie Sedgwick, it was wonderful for capturing the reckless beauty of her youth. But it was awful when she found she was a muse and nothing but a muse at a time when she needed true friends and people who might draw out her talent as well as her personality. Set largely in "the Factory," the headquarters for Warhol's Pop Art explosion, Factory Girl should be a bummer because it's almost all falling action.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 16, 2007
How simultaneously wonderful and awful to be a muse! For Andy Warhol's prize protege Edie Sedgwick, it was wonderful for capturing the reckless beauty of her youth. But it was awful when she found she was a muse and nothing but a muse at a time when she needed true friends and people who might draw out her talent as well as her personality. Set largely in "the Factory," the headquarters for Warhol's Pop Art explosion, Factory Girl should be a bummer because it's almost all falling action.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 13, 2001
"Memento" is the film-school gimmick movie of the moment. Its antihero is a brain-damaged man who can't create new memories. His mind can hold only 10 or 15 minutes of reality at a time - and that's about how long this picture stays with you. Despite his affliction, Leonard Shelby (Guy Pearce) tries to track down and kill the culprit who clubbed him and (he believes) raped and murdered his wife. He uses a system of tattoos and Polaroid snapshots to retain short-term experience, extend his investigation and exact revenge.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 25, 2004
Two Brothers resembles Disney cartoons and nature shorts of yore, but with bared and sharpened claws. The brothers of the title are a feisty tiger cub who loses his spunk to a sadistic tamer, and the docile twin who grows fearsome when caged with other wild animals in a private menagerie. The storytelling is so hectic and staccato that the difference in their temperaments as twins - when young, then older big cats - hardly registers. Too much significance rests on the sight, early in the film, of brother No. 1, Kumal, confronting an aggressive civet cat (it looks like an exotic skunk)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 25, 2004
Two Brothers resembles Disney cartoons and nature shorts of yore, but with bared and sharpened claws. The brothers of the title are a feisty tiger cub who loses his spunk to a sadistic tamer, and the docile twin who grows fearsome when caged with other wild animals in a private menagerie. The storytelling is so hectic and staccato that the difference in their temperaments as twins - when young, then older big cats - hardly registers. Too much significance rests on the sight, early in the film, of brother No. 1, Kumal, confronting an aggressive civet cat (it looks like an exotic skunk)
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By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 19, 1999
"Ravenous," horror for the art-house crowd, is a grisly comedy about cannibalism with enough wit to have one of its characters quote Benjamin Franklin ("Eat to live. Don't live to eat").This is, to say the least, unusual stuff in these days of toothless "Scream" knockoffs and "Carrie" sequels.Welcome, too -- though if the movie appeals to you at all, don't wait too long to see it. "Ravenous" is grim and nasty enough to alienate all but the most venturesome viewers, and even when approached with a forgiving eye, the film will test your patience with its uneven tone.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 25, 2002
Alexandre Dumas' 1844 page-turner The Count of Monte Cristo might be an indestructible story. It stirred movie and TV audiences when done with diverse casting choices from Robert Donat to Richard Chamberlain and Gerard Depardieu, with remarkably different adaptations ranging from the fable-like to the historical and political. And it clicks again in this well-paced action-movie version, graced with a heartfelt performance from Jim Caviezel as Edmond Dantes, the self-made Count; a rip-roaring roguish turn from the knowing - almost all-knowing - Guy Pearce (Memento)
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 21, 1998
Steve Yeager is starting production on "In Bad Taste," a follow-up to "Divine Trash," his award-winning documentary about the early career of John Waters. "In Bad Taste" will take up where "Divine Trash" left off, following Waters' career from "Pink Flamingos" through his new film, "Pecker.""We don't know if it's going to be 60 minutes or 90 minutes," Yeager said, "but it will air on Bravo and the Independent Film Channel starting in late January." "In Bad Taste" will follow "the same basic format as 'Divine Trash,' " according to Yeager.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 9, 2006
By turns grisly and hallucinatory, The Proposition is one of those grand, mythic Westerns, full of wide-open spaces and dank little hellholes, detestable bad guys and virginal women, laconic lawmen and wary natives. Only this rough-hewn land isn't the American West, but the Australian Outback; the doomed natives aren't warring Indians, but war-weary Aborigines. And while this all may sound like something out of the Sam Peckinpah playbook, the auteurs here are director John Hillcoat, working on only his third feature, and writer Nick Cave, better known as a musician than a screenwriter.
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By Michael Sragow | November 20, 2009
Paranormal Activity . ( 3 STARS) Now that the lines have dwindled, moviegoers who don't usually see horror films should take a chance on this clever, bare-bones scare film about a haunted girl and the hubris-blighted boyfriend who tries to capture her demon on his digital camera. Every rustle of a breeze or a sheet causes a big stir in the audience. Opening Wednesday The Fantastic Mr. Fox : (Fox Searchlight) Based on the story by Roald Dahl, the noble and charming Mr. Fox uses his wits and cunning to outfox three dimwitted farmers.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 25, 2002
Alexandre Dumas' 1844 page-turner The Count of Monte Cristo might be an indestructible story. It stirred movie and TV audiences when done with diverse casting choices from Robert Donat to Richard Chamberlain and Gerard Depardieu, with remarkably different adaptations ranging from the fable-like to the historical and political. And it clicks again in this well-paced action-movie version, graced with a heartfelt performance from Jim Caviezel as Edmond Dantes, the self-made Count; a rip-roaring roguish turn from the knowing - almost all-knowing - Guy Pearce (Memento)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 13, 2001
"Memento" is the film-school gimmick movie of the moment. Its antihero is a brain-damaged man who can't create new memories. His mind can hold only 10 or 15 minutes of reality at a time - and that's about how long this picture stays with you. Despite his affliction, Leonard Shelby (Guy Pearce) tries to track down and kill the culprit who clubbed him and (he believes) raped and murdered his wife. He uses a system of tattoos and Polaroid snapshots to retain short-term experience, extend his investigation and exact revenge.
FEATURES
By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 19, 1999
"Ravenous," horror for the art-house crowd, is a grisly comedy about cannibalism with enough wit to have one of its characters quote Benjamin Franklin ("Eat to live. Don't live to eat").This is, to say the least, unusual stuff in these days of toothless "Scream" knockoffs and "Carrie" sequels.Welcome, too -- though if the movie appeals to you at all, don't wait too long to see it. "Ravenous" is grim and nasty enough to alienate all but the most venturesome viewers, and even when approached with a forgiving eye, the film will test your patience with its uneven tone.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 21, 1998
Steve Yeager is starting production on "In Bad Taste," a follow-up to "Divine Trash," his award-winning documentary about the early career of John Waters. "In Bad Taste" will take up where "Divine Trash" left off, following Waters' career from "Pink Flamingos" through his new film, "Pecker.""We don't know if it's going to be 60 minutes or 90 minutes," Yeager said, "but it will air on Bravo and the Independent Film Channel starting in late January." "In Bad Taste" will follow "the same basic format as 'Divine Trash,' " according to Yeager.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 2, 2006
VIDEO JIHAD -- Budding filmmakers looking for something different should check out the Creative Alliance tomorrow. In the Video Jihad Culture Jam Video Contest, you're given a piece of film (actually a Quicktime or AVI clip) and need to incorporate it into an original work by week's end. Interested creative types should meet at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson, 3134 Eastern Ave., at 7 p.m. tomorrow; the resulting works will be shown June 10 at 7 p.m. The entrance fee is $25, $20 for CA members.
EXPLORE
September 22, 2012
now playing "2016 Obama's America" (PG). Documentary based on Dinesh D'Souza's book, "The Roots of Obama's Rage. " TownMall Cinemas (12:45 p.m.) "Dredd" (R). In the future, a tough cop serves as judge, jury and executioner. With Karl Urban, Olivia Thirlby and Lena Headeya. TownMall Cinemas (1:20*, 3:50, 4:20*, 6:50, 7:20* p.m.) "End of Watch" (R). Police partners form a close bond, and also share a challenging life on the street. With Jake Gyllenhaal, Michael Peña.
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