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NEWS
September 2, 2008
EDWIN O. GUTHMAN, 89 Journalist on Nixon 'enemies list' Edwin O. Guthman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who was on the infamous "enemies list" prepared by aides of President Richard M. Nixon and who served as press secretary to Robert F. Kennedy, has died at 89. Mr. Guthman, who had a rare blood disease called amyloidosis, died Sunday at his home in Pacific Palisades, Calif., said Bryce Nelson, a family spokesman. "Ed Guthman was not only a great friend, but a great journalist," Paul Conrad, a longtime political cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times, said yesterday.
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NEWS
September 2, 2008
EDWIN O. GUTHMAN, 89 Journalist on Nixon 'enemies list' Edwin O. Guthman, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who was on the infamous "enemies list" prepared by aides of President Richard M. Nixon and who served as press secretary to Robert F. Kennedy, has died at 89. Mr. Guthman, who had a rare blood disease called amyloidosis, died Sunday at his home in Pacific Palisades, Calif., said Bryce Nelson, a family spokesman. "Ed Guthman was not only a great friend, but a great journalist," Paul Conrad, a longtime political cartoonist for the Los Angeles Times, said yesterday.
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FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen | June 6, 1993
As in any other field of collecting, there are plenty of fake powder horns. William H. Guthman notes there are more examples with historic maps, scenes and personages than carvers who worked during the period in which the depicted events took place could have made. Some are old horns whose 18th-century dates were carved in the 1820s to 1840s to convince officials their owners were veterans entitled to pensions or land bounties. Others likely were carved at the end of the 19th century to "establish" that ancestors had participated in the Revolutionary War so the family could join newly formed patriotic organizations like the Sons of the American Revolution.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO - A multimillionaire newspaper subscriber who sued to block the merger of San Francisco's last two metropolitan daily newspapers has opened a door on the deal-making and political power struggles in this city. The case took on new dimensions for newspaper people May 1, when Timothy O. White, publisher of the Hearst-owned Examiner, suggested in federal court that he had been willing to treat Mayor Willie Brown less critically in his paper's editorials in exchange for the mayor's support for Hearst's plan to buy the more successful Chronicle.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | June 6, 1993
The most successful collectors aren't trendy. They seek no approval except their own and keep quiet about what they're buying to have the field all to themselves. Then, a decade ormore later, when they show off their accumulated treasures, latecomers gaze enviously. "Why didn't I think of collecting that way back when it was cheap and plentiful?" is the common refrain.One trick to building a collection that can be savored privately, exhibited publicly or, if you're lucky, sold for a handsome profit, is to find a neglected field.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen | June 6, 1993
According to collector William H. Guthman, during the 17th and 18th century, when England and France were fighting for control of North America, both sides depended upon their Indian allies and on provincial militia to reinforce the few regiments of regulars stationed in the New World colonies.Each soldier provided his own musket, bayonet (or sword or tomahawk) and cartridge boxes or powder horns, unless he couldn't afford them, Mr. Guthman added. In that case, the town supplied them.Boxes for "prefixed" cartridges used in flintlock muskets weren't always available to provincial troops, so they relied on hollowed-out horn containers to carry the powder with which they made their own cartridges.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | August 9, 1998
Putting aside spiritual sports (I think of mountaineering and fly-fishing), no game has inspired literature as have baseball and boxing. Once as a young man, I spent an evening in Madison Square Garden with A.J. Liebling, a hero of mine, and a few other ecstatic boxing enthusiasts. But even in their company, the grace of pugilism still eluded me.Baseball is a different story.Why? Because it endures immortally as the most civilized and most intelligent of all the sports contrived by humankind.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO - A multimillionaire newspaper subscriber who sued to block the merger of San Francisco's last two metropolitan daily newspapers has opened a door on the deal-making and political power struggles in this city. The case took on new dimensions for newspaper people May 1, when Timothy O. White, publisher of the Hearst-owned Examiner, suggested in federal court that he had been willing to treat Mayor Willie Brown less critically in his paper's editorials in exchange for the mayor's support for Hearst's plan to buy the more successful Chronicle.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration has chosen the chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, a former Watergate prosecutor and a journalism professor to oversee its investigation of the February raid on the Branch Davidian compound near Waco, Texas, senior officials said yesterday.Officials said Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen had selected Chief Willie L. Williams, Henry Ruth, the former prosecutor, and Edwin O. Guthman to evaluate the investigation. Mr. Guthman, a former official in the Justice Department who worked under Robert F. Kennedy, is now a professor of journalism at the University of Southern California.
NEWS
February 18, 1996
More prisons needed to deter criminalsThe article, "New prison construction comes to halt," by Peter Jensen (Jan. 23) requires a reply.Gov. Parris N. Glendening has now called for a halt to prison construction. His rationale is that this money could better be used for education and other ventures.Although I commend him for his lofty thoughts, the fact is that our prisons are now overcrowded and will continue to be. Many are committing crimes -- and serious ones, at that -- and are getting off with a slap on the wrist.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | August 9, 1998
Putting aside spiritual sports (I think of mountaineering and fly-fishing), no game has inspired literature as have baseball and boxing. Once as a young man, I spent an evening in Madison Square Garden with A.J. Liebling, a hero of mine, and a few other ecstatic boxing enthusiasts. But even in their company, the grace of pugilism still eluded me.Baseball is a different story.Why? Because it endures immortally as the most civilized and most intelligent of all the sports contrived by humankind.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen | June 6, 1993
According to collector William H. Guthman, during the 17th and 18th century, when England and France were fighting for control of North America, both sides depended upon their Indian allies and on provincial militia to reinforce the few regiments of regulars stationed in the New World colonies.Each soldier provided his own musket, bayonet (or sword or tomahawk) and cartridge boxes or powder horns, unless he couldn't afford them, Mr. Guthman added. In that case, the town supplied them.Boxes for "prefixed" cartridges used in flintlock muskets weren't always available to provincial troops, so they relied on hollowed-out horn containers to carry the powder with which they made their own cartridges.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | June 6, 1993
The most successful collectors aren't trendy. They seek no approval except their own and keep quiet about what they're buying to have the field all to themselves. Then, a decade ormore later, when they show off their accumulated treasures, latecomers gaze enviously. "Why didn't I think of collecting that way back when it was cheap and plentiful?" is the common refrain.One trick to building a collection that can be savored privately, exhibited publicly or, if you're lucky, sold for a handsome profit, is to find a neglected field.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen | June 6, 1993
As in any other field of collecting, there are plenty of fake powder horns. William H. Guthman notes there are more examples with historic maps, scenes and personages than carvers who worked during the period in which the depicted events took place could have made. Some are old horns whose 18th-century dates were carved in the 1820s to 1840s to convince officials their owners were veterans entitled to pensions or land bounties. Others likely were carved at the end of the 19th century to "establish" that ancestors had participated in the Revolutionary War so the family could join newly formed patriotic organizations like the Sons of the American Revolution.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 1999
The Chesapeake Music Hall took its 15-member cast of singing and dancing actors and a sound and light crew on the road Saturday to do excerpts from a dozen Broadway shows for the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum, and PAAL never looked or sounded better.That's at least partly the work of lighting and sound designer Garrett Hyde, technician Karel Richardson and light man Greg Guthman, who turned the auditorium at North County High School into a cabaret for this show.Music hall owner, general manager, director, choreographer and costumer Sherry Kay provided costumes for "Mame," "Annie Get Your Gun," "South Pacific," "Oklahoma," "Fiddler on the Roof," "Damn Yankees," "Little Shop of Horrors" and "42nd Street" and assisted with split-second changes.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | January 12, 1992
Q: We collect early fireplace cooking implements and would like to know where we can find a certain type of wrought-iron toaster designed to bake flat breads on the hearth. Also, can you tell us how such breads were made?A: Horseshoe-shaped wrought-iron toasters were made to stand the hearth like easels. They were used in Scotland as early as the 17th century for baking bannocks, or Irish flat bread; the dough was placed on a narrow ledge at the bottom of the piece and positioned before the fire.
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