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Gustav Stickley

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By Ellen Uzelac and By Ellen Uzelac,Special to the Sun | April 14, 2002
Most people know Gustav Stickley for his sturdy and straightforward furniture. But he was far more than a gifted woodworker whose creations fetch heady prices from collectors today. As one of the best-known spokesmen for the American Arts and Crafts movement a century ago, Stickley was a philosopher, publisher and social critic who championed a return to things simple -- what he called "a fine plainness" to the art of living. For Stickley fans -- and I'm one of them -- a visit to the Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms in Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, N.J., is an imperative this year.
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By Ellen Uzelac and By Ellen Uzelac,Special to the Sun | April 14, 2002
Most people know Gustav Stickley for his sturdy and straightforward furniture. But he was far more than a gifted woodworker whose creations fetch heady prices from collectors today. As one of the best-known spokesmen for the American Arts and Crafts movement a century ago, Stickley was a philosopher, publisher and social critic who championed a return to things simple -- what he called "a fine plainness" to the art of living. For Stickley fans -- and I'm one of them -- a visit to the Stickley Museum at Craftsman Farms in Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, N.J., is an imperative this year.
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By Lita Solis-Cohen | January 26, 1992
Arts and Crafts furniture and furnishings made from the late 1890s to just after World War I may be the style statement of the 1990s. "It's not a coincidence that after the S&L scandal and Donald Trump got his comeuppance people should respond to Arts and Crafts," says Chicago dealer Michael FitzSimmons. "This furniture so directly and so intrinsically declares that it is honest and straightforward."The resurgence of interest in the Arts and Crafts movement parallels the values that brought it to life: a reaction against adornment and conspicuous consumption, joined with an emphasis on the virtues and comforts of home and family, respect for the natural environment and concern about the socio-economic condition of working people.
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By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | March 20, 1994
Q: The enclosed picture is of an oak sideboard that was given to me by my grandmother. There is a label on the back that says "Craftsman Workshop -- Eastwood, New York -- Gustav Stickley -- New York Show Room -- 29 West Thirty Fourth Street."I would like to know anything you could tell me about my sideboard. Is there a book about antique furniture of this type that you could recommend?A: Gustav Stickley was one of the leaders of the arts and crafts movement that began in the late 1890s. He formed a guild-type furniture shop in 1899 that was the forerunner of his Craftsman Workshops.
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By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | March 20, 1994
Q: The enclosed picture is of an oak sideboard that was given to me by my grandmother. There is a label on the back that says "Craftsman Workshop -- Eastwood, New York -- Gustav Stickley -- New York Show Room -- 29 West Thirty Fourth Street."I would like to know anything you could tell me about my sideboard. Is there a book about antique furniture of this type that you could recommend?A: Gustav Stickley was one of the leaders of the arts and crafts movement that began in the late 1890s. He formed a guild-type furniture shop in 1899 that was the forerunner of his Craftsman Workshops.
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By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | September 26, 1993
It's harvest time and collectors of Grueby art pottery are eyeing the current crop of available squash- and gourd-like vases and earth-toned glazed tiles made in Boston from 1894 to 1920. In seasons past conditions were ripe for bunches of good buys: fewer collectors and a more bountiful supply. Choice pickings are slimmer now, thanks to heated competition, and many expect prices to start climbing again after wilting in the recession.More attention is being paid now to the organic-looking pottery made by William H. Grueby's factory than ever before.
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December 5, 1999
1904: Gustav Stickley fathers the Mission Style of fine furnishings1905: Madame C. J. Walker develops black hair care products
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By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | May 31, 1992
Q: I would like some information about the value and date of my hobby horse. It is marked "Mobo Bronco."It measures 30 1/2 inches tall and 27 inches long. When jumping, the legs move and it rolls on wooden wheels. The horse is all metal.A: This was made in England in the mid-20th century. It would probably sell for $225 to $235 in good condition.Q: The attached mark is on the bottom of an art deco-type figure of a man with a woman embracing.The height is about 8 inches.I would like to know who made this, its vintage and value.
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By Maria Hiaasen and Maria Hiaasen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 1997
It tends to be heavy, not frilly. It's simple, not fancy. It has rows of vertical or horizontal slats, not curves and scrolls. Mission-style furniture, which dotted the country in bungalows and cottages around the turn of the century, has not only come back, it's going mainstream. Mission furniture -- similar to a Spanish-style chair first found in California's Franciscan missions now appears in colonials and rowhouses, condominiums and apartments.Maybe it's just the right furniture for our time.
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By CHARLYNE VARKONYI SCHAUB and CHARLYNE VARKONYI SCHAUB,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | May 6, 2006
HIGH POINT, N.C. -- Furniture manufacturers are betting we're so fed up with technology and mass-produced goods that we will want to put our money on the Simple Life. This yearning for a vanishing lifestyle has nothing to do with Nicole Richie and Paris Hilton. It has everything to do with the Arts & Crafts Movement that made Gustav Stickley, Frank Lloyd Wright and Greene & Greene household names. The most repeated mantra at the International Home Furnishings Market that ended here Wednesday was the simple lines and fine craftsmanship of Arts & Crafts and Mission furniture.
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By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen,Contributing Writers | September 26, 1993
It's harvest time and collectors of Grueby art pottery are eyeing the current crop of available squash- and gourd-like vases and earth-toned glazed tiles made in Boston from 1894 to 1920. In seasons past conditions were ripe for bunches of good buys: fewer collectors and a more bountiful supply. Choice pickings are slimmer now, thanks to heated competition, and many expect prices to start climbing again after wilting in the recession.More attention is being paid now to the organic-looking pottery made by William H. Grueby's factory than ever before.
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By Lita Solis-Cohen | January 26, 1992
Arts and Crafts furniture and furnishings made from the late 1890s to just after World War I may be the style statement of the 1990s. "It's not a coincidence that after the S&L scandal and Donald Trump got his comeuppance people should respond to Arts and Crafts," says Chicago dealer Michael FitzSimmons. "This furniture so directly and so intrinsically declares that it is honest and straightforward."The resurgence of interest in the Arts and Crafts movement parallels the values that brought it to life: a reaction against adornment and conspicuous consumption, joined with an emphasis on the virtues and comforts of home and family, respect for the natural environment and concern about the socio-economic condition of working people.
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By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | February 23, 1997
When is a valentine not a valentine? When it is a "sailor's valentine," which was not meant to be given as a gift on Feb. 14.The so-called sailor's valentine was a shallow wooden box that was filled with shells placed in geometric patterns. The boxes were usually octagonal, but some were rectangular or circular.The seashell collages were made as souvenirs sold to visitors on tropical islands. Sometimes the name of the island or affectionate greetings were worked into the shell pattern.Because sailors often brought the boxes back from trips as gifts for loved ones, collectors refer to them as "valentines."
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By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | February 8, 1998
Marks, labels and maker's names add to the value of any antique or collectible. A label usually gives positive identification of the maker and clues to help a collector determine the piece's age.But be careful about trusting all that you see or hear. In the past year, we have seen fake pottery vases with the raised trademark "Roseville," new dishes stamped with the old green Nippon mark, pieces of new scrimshaw decorated with ships and mermaids and the date 1824, and furniture with the Gustav Stickley mark added.
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