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By CHIRS KALTENBACH | March 10, 2009
Milk Starring Sean Penn, Josh Brolin. Directed by Gus Van Sant. Released by Universal Studios. $29.98. (Blu-ray, $39.95) Rated R. *** 1/2 (3 1/2 STARS) Sean Penn is nothing short of extraordinary in Milk, director Gus Van Sant's biopic of slain gay rights pioneer and San Francisco assemblyman Harvey Milk. He loses himself absolutely in the role, becoming this outgoing, physically slight but emotionally volatile character whose energy is only matched by his outrage over the inequities gay men like him have had to endure for too long.
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By CHIRS KALTENBACH | March 10, 2009
Milk Starring Sean Penn, Josh Brolin. Directed by Gus Van Sant. Released by Universal Studios. $29.98. (Blu-ray, $39.95) Rated R. *** 1/2 (3 1/2 STARS) Sean Penn is nothing short of extraordinary in Milk, director Gus Van Sant's biopic of slain gay rights pioneer and San Francisco assemblyman Harvey Milk. He loses himself absolutely in the role, becoming this outgoing, physically slight but emotionally volatile character whose energy is only matched by his outrage over the inequities gay men like him have had to endure for too long.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 28, 2003
When the American journalist asks T.E. Lawrence why he loves the desert in Lawrence of Arabia, the hero famously replies, "It's clean." That must be what made director Gus Van Sant traverse the anonymous sandscapes of his new film Gerry. After crafting off-Hollywood milestones like Drugstore Cowboy, Van Sant entered safe middlebrow respectability with Good Will Hunting, then wandered into bungled commercial inanities like a shot-for-shot color remake of Hitchcock's black-and-white classic Psycho (an art-school experiment at best)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 28, 2003
When the American journalist asks T.E. Lawrence why he loves the desert in Lawrence of Arabia, the hero famously replies, "It's clean." That must be what made director Gus Van Sant traverse the anonymous sandscapes of his new film Gerry. After crafting off-Hollywood milestones like Drugstore Cowboy, Van Sant entered safe middlebrow respectability with Good Will Hunting, then wandered into bungled commercial inanities like a shot-for-shot color remake of Hitchcock's black-and-white classic Psycho (an art-school experiment at best)
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 18, 1991
Gus Van Sant is another of those independent fringe directors who makes the kind of films he wants and is lucky enough to find the backing.Van Sant did ''Drugstore Cowboy,'' a saga of drugs, sex and death. His newest is ''My Own Private Idaho,'' a movie about two male prostitutes.It's a very poetic film. That is, it includes images that may mean more to the director than the spectator, but the film is an interesting one.River Phoenix and Keanu Reeves star. Phoenix plays Mike, a homosexual who sells himself to those who can afford him. He comes from a family that is highly dysfunctional.
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March 14, 2008
Next Friday DIVA -- (Rialto) A pair of Parisian mob killers, a corrupt policeman, an opera fan, a teenage thief and a philosopher twist their way through an intricate and stylish French thriller. PARANOID PARK -- (IFC) Filmmaker Gus Van Sant returns to Portland, Ore., for the story of a skate punk who accidentally kills a security guard and says nothing. With Gabe Nevins and Taylor Momsen. HONEYDRIPPER -- (Emerging Pictures) A former blues piano player hatches a plan to save his tiny, run-down juke joint, the Honeydripper Lounge.
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By Steven Rea and Steven Rea,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 30, 1992
Watch out for the "new" new wave. In the September issue of Esquire, screenwriter L. M. Kit Carson has come up with a gimmicky but nonetheless noteworthy roster of rising film biz stars -- directors, writers, actors and producers.These are folks, says Mr. Carson, who come out of the same new independent tradition as the Coen Brothers, Steven Soderbergh, Gus Van Sant, Spike Lee and John Turturro. He calls them the "Eleventh Generation" of Hollywood filmmakers (D.W. Griffith belonged to the first, silent stars Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton the second, and so on)
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By Los Angeles Times | March 30, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- "Rambling Rose," the wistful story of a young woman's romances and her impact on an upstanding Southern family, was named best American film produced outside of the Hollywood studio system at Saturday's Independent Spirit Awards party."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Los Angeles Daily News | July 12, 1991
What's in a name?If yours is Keanu Reeves, you've probably pondered that question once or twice. (Keanu, by the way, is a Hawaiian appellation.)Names have had an unusual impact on the 26-year-old Lebanon-born, Toronto-raised actor's movie career.Of course, there's Ted, the San Dimas heavy-metal kid Reeves is famous for playing in the comedy "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" and its sequel, "Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey," which comes to theaters July 19.Mr. Reeves is so natural as the good-hearted, air guitar-playing airhead that it's become his signature film persona.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 25, 1997
"Good Will Hunting," a tale of love, friendship and personal growth that was written by childhood friends Ben Affleck and Matt Damon, fairly bursts with the exuberance and youthful energy that must have attended its creation.Affleck and Damon, who star in the film, wrote the script as struggling young actors, before such vehicles as "Chasing Amy" and "The Rainmaker" put them on the map as major heartthrobs (and, by the way, very fine actors).As a young-gifted-and-angry melodrama, "Good Will Hunting" is pretty standard fare.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 5, 2003
Gus Van Sant titled his new movie about a Portland high school that becomes host to a Columbine-like atrocity Elephant, in homage to the late British director Alan Clarke's movie about Northern Ireland, also called Elephant. Clarke got the name from the idea of people talking around the elephant in the room - the great big thing you can't discuss. But Van Sant was also thinking of the parable of the blind men and the elephant, in which six sightless wise men are asked to describe an elephant, and, putting their hands on different portions of the beast, say it's like a wall, a rope, a snake, and so on. The parable sums up the futility of finding the truth in any one man's observations.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 25, 2000
If director Gus Van Sant isn't careful, audiences might start thinking he has permanently crossed over into the cushy mainstream of commercial success. Van Sant made his name with such edgy, indie gems as "Drugstore Cowboy" and "My Own Private Idaho." But in "Finding Forrester," he has produced a compelling film that probably will be as popular with audiences, critics and those folks who hand out statuettes as his Academy-Award winning "Good Will Hunting." In fact, there's already early Oscar buzz for Van Sant and "Forrester" co-stars Sean Connery and Rob Brown.
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