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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 20, 2002
Think of Firefly as Gunsmoke in a spaceship, and you're halfway home in understanding what creator Joss Whedon is up to in this Fox drama he labels "sci-fi/western." He's playing with genres and creating a new mythology that isn't likely to grab viewers the way his Buffy the Vampire Slayer did but is nevertheless one of the more imaginative hours of the new season. The year is 2502, and a great civil war has just been fought in the galaxy with the Alliance, a totalitarian government aimed at unification of the planets, the winner.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 20, 2002
Think of Firefly as Gunsmoke in a spaceship, and you're halfway home in understanding what creator Joss Whedon is up to in this Fox drama he labels "sci-fi/western." He's playing with genres and creating a new mythology that isn't likely to grab viewers the way his Buffy the Vampire Slayer did but is nevertheless one of the more imaginative hours of the new season. The year is 2502, and a great civil war has just been fought in the galaxy with the Alliance, a totalitarian government aimed at unification of the planets, the winner.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 25, 1991
It's not Dodge City. None of the original cast is on hand except for Matt Dillon. And he's not even wearing a badge.But "Gunsmoke III" -- the latest sequel to the landmark western series, scheduled to air at 9 p.m. Sunday on Channel 11 -- is a good, hard ride through the west of myth, symbol and shared memory. The camera cleaves to the craggy, iconic features of James Arness from the opening scene and uses that image to deliver the same goods as the original "Gunsmoke" series: the story of a hard and good man bringing law and order to a hard and bad land.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | November 25, 1992
Thirty-eight fugitives charged with serious sex offenses were captured in the Baltimore area in a recent six-week operation by the U.S. Marshals Service, federal authorities said yesterday. Nationwide, the operation -- dubbed "Gunsmoke II" -- hauled in 1,078 fugitives in 19 metropolitan areas. More than 70 percent of those arrested were charged with sex offenses. But the marshals service -- the federal government's primary fugitive-hunting law enforcement agency -- estimated that there were still about 99,000 fugitives wanted throughout the country for sex offenses and other serious crimes.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Twenty-seven murder suspects were among the 126 people arrested by federal and local authorities in a 10-week search for violent criminals, the U.S. marshal for Maryland announced yesterday.U.S. Marshal Scott A. Sewell said the manhunt, dubbed "Operation Gunsmoke," landed more than half the fugitives lawmen were looking for at the outset of the searches. Another fourth either were already in jail on other charges or dead.Operation Gunsmoke was part of a nationwide hunt for violent offenders that landed 3,313 criminal suspects in 40 cities, including 224 people wanted for murder.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer Staff Writer Frank D. Roylance contributed to this story | April 30, 1992
A 10-week sting operation resulted in the arrests of 126 criminal suspects in the Baltimore area, including 27 people charged with murder, the U.S. marshal for Maryland announced today.The manhunt, dubbed "Operation Gunsmoke," was part of a national project that focused on the most violent criminals and suspects involved in illegal drug activity, said Scott A. Sewell, the U.S. marshal for Maryland.It involved federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, who also rounded up 10 fugitives.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | January 10, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Talk about a lifetime role. Actor James Arness is back again tonight on CBS as Dodge City Marshal Matt Dillon in "Gunsmoke III: To the Last Man" (at 8 p.m., Channel 11).He first played the role in 1955 when "Gunsmoke" debuted on CBS eventually to become the longest-running prime time drama series in TV history. (It left the air in 1975.)Trivia buffs may know that John Wayne turned down the TV part, which had been acted on the predating radio series by William Conrad. Most also know that Arness is in real-life the brother of actor Peter Graves ("Mission Impossible," "Fury," etc.)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 30, 1991
The November "sweeps" ratings period starts today. And that means it's a time of many happy returns in Television Land.Reunion shows and retrospectives -- along with their inverse image, the murder melodrama (see story below) -- have become a recent staple of ratings periods, and the trend kicks in again on Sunday night.In what now rates full-blown miniseries packaging from NBC, Kenny Rogers is back in the Old West for the fourth time in "The Gambler Returns: The Luck of the Draw." A week from Sunday (Nov.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | November 25, 1992
Thirty-eight fugitives charged with serious sex offenses were captured in the Baltimore area in a recent six-week operation by the U.S. Marshals Service, federal authorities said yesterday. Nationwide, the operation -- dubbed "Gunsmoke II" -- hauled in 1,078 fugitives in 19 metropolitan areas. More than 70 percent of those arrested were charged with sex offenses. But the marshals service -- the federal government's primary fugitive-hunting law enforcement agency -- estimated that there were still about 99,000 fugitives wanted throughout the country for sex offenses and other serious crimes.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
To lovers of Wild West folklore, he's Wyatt Earp - lawman, saloonkeeper, gambler, quick-triggered centerpiece of the legendary gunfight at the OK Corral. To Charles Earp Jr. of Catonsville and Pamela Earp Young of Ellicott City, he's cousin Wyatt. That the man who almost single-handedly defines the Wild West would have a couple of relatives in Maryland - and that those relatives would meet by coincidence - is perhaps not as far afield as it might seem. As it turns out, the Earp clan got its start in the United States when Thomas Earp Jr. of Ireland came to the Baltimore area in the 17th century as an indentured servant.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Twenty-seven murder suspects were among the 126 people arrested by federal and local authorities in a 10-week search for violent criminals, the U.S. marshal for Maryland announced yesterday.U.S. Marshal Scott A. Sewell said the manhunt, dubbed "Operation Gunsmoke," landed more than half the fugitives lawmen were looking for at the outset of the searches. Another fourth either were already in jail on other charges or dead.Operation Gunsmoke was part of a nationwide hunt for violent offenders that landed 3,313 criminal suspects in 40 cities, including 224 people wanted for murder.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer Staff Writer Frank D. Roylance contributed to this story | April 30, 1992
A 10-week sting operation resulted in the arrests of 126 criminal suspects in the Baltimore area, including 27 people charged with murder, the U.S. marshal for Maryland announced today.The manhunt, dubbed "Operation Gunsmoke," was part of a national project that focused on the most violent criminals and suspects involved in illegal drug activity, said Scott A. Sewell, the U.S. marshal for Maryland.It involved federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, who also rounded up 10 fugitives.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | January 10, 1992
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Talk about a lifetime role. Actor James Arness is back again tonight on CBS as Dodge City Marshal Matt Dillon in "Gunsmoke III: To the Last Man" (at 8 p.m., Channel 11).He first played the role in 1955 when "Gunsmoke" debuted on CBS eventually to become the longest-running prime time drama series in TV history. (It left the air in 1975.)Trivia buffs may know that John Wayne turned down the TV part, which had been acted on the predating radio series by William Conrad. Most also know that Arness is in real-life the brother of actor Peter Graves ("Mission Impossible," "Fury," etc.)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 30, 1991
The November "sweeps" ratings period starts today. And that means it's a time of many happy returns in Television Land.Reunion shows and retrospectives -- along with their inverse image, the murder melodrama (see story below) -- have become a recent staple of ratings periods, and the trend kicks in again on Sunday night.In what now rates full-blown miniseries packaging from NBC, Kenny Rogers is back in the Old West for the fourth time in "The Gambler Returns: The Luck of the Draw." A week from Sunday (Nov.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 25, 1991
It's not Dodge City. None of the original cast is on hand except for Matt Dillon. And he's not even wearing a badge.But "Gunsmoke III" -- the latest sequel to the landmark western series, scheduled to air at 9 p.m. Sunday on Channel 11 -- is a good, hard ride through the west of myth, symbol and shared memory. The camera cleaves to the craggy, iconic features of James Arness from the opening scene and uses that image to deliver the same goods as the original "Gunsmoke" series: the story of a hard and good man bringing law and order to a hard and bad land.
NEWS
November 19, 1990
Harry Lauter, 76, a veteran cowboy actor in television westerns, died Oct. 30 of heart failure at his home in Ojai, Calif. A regular black hat in westerns, Mr. Lauter appeared in such series as "Wagon Train," "Rawhide," "Gunsmoke," "Bonanza" and "Wyatt Earp." He also had two series of his own: "Waterfront," in 1954, and "Tales of the Texas Rangers," from 1955 to 1959.
NEWS
November 10, 1993
Charles Aidman, a TV actor who ap- peared in one of the first "Twilight Zone" episodes and narrated an updated version of the science fiction series, died of cancer Sunday in Beverly Hills, Calif. The 68-year-old actor appeared in "The Fugitive," "Gunsmoke," "The Wild, Wild West," "Little House on the Prairie" and "Quincy, M.E."
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