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NEWS
May 27, 2006
George Courtney Wessinger, a retired state trooper and gunsmith, died of complications from a stroke May 18 in Lexington, S.C. The former Annapolis and Westminster resident was 68. Born in Forest City, N.C., he moved to Bethesda in 1950 and was in the Navy at the time of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. He was a navigator on a Navy plane. He earned an associate's degree from Catonsville Community College. He served with the Maryland State Police for 20 years before retiring as a sergeant in 1985.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 25, 2008
John Rowland Kraft Jr., a retired WBAL-TV supervisor who enjoyed gunsmithing and keymaking, died Sunday of lung cancer at his Sparks home. He was 68. Mr. Kraft was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1958 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and attended the old Baltimore Junior College. He also served in the Coast Guard on active duty for six months and remained in the Coast Guard Reserve for eight years. In 1960, he went to work in the engineering department at WBAL radio and transferred in the late 1970s to its television station.
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NEWS
By Marie V. Forbes | October 24, 1990
Myrle Devilbiss is not optimistic about the state of our world."Too many laws, too many crooks," the 82-year-old Taneytown gunsmith says, testily.Devilbiss' major gripe is with the federal regulations that require permits to sell pistols and with the registration forms he must fill out for all firearms except antique weapons."
NEWS
May 27, 2006
George Courtney Wessinger, a retired state trooper and gunsmith, died of complications from a stroke May 18 in Lexington, S.C. The former Annapolis and Westminster resident was 68. Born in Forest City, N.C., he moved to Bethesda in 1950 and was in the Navy at the time of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. He was a navigator on a Navy plane. He earned an associate's degree from Catonsville Community College. He served with the Maryland State Police for 20 years before retiring as a sergeant in 1985.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Alec MacGillis and Scott Calvert and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2002
BELLINGHAM, Wash. - Authorities were notified nearly a year ago that John Allen Muhammad, one of two men held in Baltimore in the sniper shootings, had asked a gunsmith about modifying a rifle so it could be taken apart and carried in a small case before being reassembled for use, police here said yesterday. Kristine Sagor, a former property manager at an apartment complex where Muhammad was doing odd jobs, told several law enforcement agencies, including the FBI, that Muhammad had asked her for a ride to a gunsmith in a small bayside town near Bellingham, Sagor's lawyer said yesterday.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2000
A Fells Point gun shop owner, long targeted by law enforcement agencies as the most prolific source of guns used in Baltimore crimes, has sued federal authorities who pulled his license to sell firearms. The lawsuit, filed last month in U.S. District Court by the owner of Baltimore Gunsmith, Larry DiMartino, accuses the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms of acting as "investigator, charging party, prosecutor and deciding entity" during an administrative hearing in February. Federal officials declined to comment on the lawsuit but said they went after the store as part of a crackdown on illegal gun sales and after a proliferation of weapons traced to the shop turned up at city crime scenes.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2001
A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought against the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms by a Fells Point gun shop owner who complained that authorities unfairly revoked his license to sell firearms. On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz said ATF investigators had sufficient evidence to pull the firearms license for Baltimore Gunsmith, the South Broadway shop targeted by police as one of the most prolific sources of guns used in Baltimore crimes. Owner Larry DiMartino had charged in a federal lawsuit last year that ATF officials violated his due process rights by acting as "investigator, charging party, prosecutor and deciding entity" in pulling his firearms license.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2001
Federal authorities said yesterday they will immediately take steps to shut down a well-known Fells Point gun shop after a judge ruled that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms acted properly in revoking the store's license to sell firearms. Baltimore Gunsmith, long targeted by police as one of the most prolific sources of guns used in area crimes, will have about 30 days to sell its inventory and close its doors, said Special Agent Mike Campbell, a spokesman for the ATF's local field office.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | January 25, 2008
John Rowland Kraft Jr., a retired WBAL-TV supervisor who enjoyed gunsmithing and keymaking, died Sunday of lung cancer at his Sparks home. He was 68. Mr. Kraft was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1958 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and attended the old Baltimore Junior College. He also served in the Coast Guard on active duty for six months and remained in the Coast Guard Reserve for eight years. In 1960, he went to work in the engineering department at WBAL radio and transferred in the late 1970s to its television station.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 6, 2001
In Baltimore City Baltimore Gunsmith will remain open, shop's owner says Baltimore Gunsmith owner Larry DiMartino said yesterday that his Fells Point shop will remain open, even if he is forced by federal authorities to quit selling firearms. DiMartino, who has operated the South Broadway store for nine years, said he plans to continue selling hunting and archery supplies although the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms said this week it will take steps to shut down his gun business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 28, 2004
Oklahoma-born, Montana-bred public radio star and essayist Sarah Vowell has an original writing voice -- loopy, lucid and colloquial -- and an original speaking voice -- like that of a boy soprano on the verge of cracking. She's won a youthful following with regular appearances on NBC's Late Night With Conan O'Brien. But Brad Bird, the writer-director of this fall's biggest movie, The Incredibles, discovered her on public radio's This American Life. He heard her talking about her father, a gunsmith -- and a 300-watt Eureka bulb flashed over his head.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Alec MacGillis and Scott Calvert and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2002
BELLINGHAM, Wash. - Authorities were notified nearly a year ago that John Allen Muhammad, one of two men held in Baltimore in the sniper shootings, had asked a gunsmith about modifying a rifle so it could be taken apart and carried in a small case before being reassembled for use, police here said yesterday. Kristine Sagor, a former property manager at an apartment complex where Muhammad was doing odd jobs, told several law enforcement agencies, including the FBI, that Muhammad had asked her for a ride to a gunsmith in a small bayside town near Bellingham, Sagor's lawyer said yesterday.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 6, 2001
In Baltimore City Baltimore Gunsmith will remain open, shop's owner says Baltimore Gunsmith owner Larry DiMartino said yesterday that his Fells Point shop will remain open, even if he is forced by federal authorities to quit selling firearms. DiMartino, who has operated the South Broadway store for nine years, said he plans to continue selling hunting and archery supplies although the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms said this week it will take steps to shut down his gun business.
NEWS
January 6, 2001
WHEN A STORE has been in business for 96 years, it acquires a reputation. Baltimore Gunsmith Co. surely has: Twenty percent of the firearms seized in city crimes over the past nine years -- a total of more than 1,000 weapons -- were bought at the upper Fells Point shop. Despite this link, city and federal officials failed for years in their efforts to close down this gun supplier for criminals. That's why the recent ruling of U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz is so important: He denied the gun store owners' appeal for a license.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2001
Federal authorities said yesterday they will immediately take steps to shut down a well-known Fells Point gun shop after a judge ruled that the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms acted properly in revoking the store's license to sell firearms. Baltimore Gunsmith, long targeted by police as one of the most prolific sources of guns used in area crimes, will have about 30 days to sell its inventory and close its doors, said Special Agent Mike Campbell, a spokesman for the ATF's local field office.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2001
A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought against the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms by a Fells Point gun shop owner who complained that authorities unfairly revoked his license to sell firearms. On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz said ATF investigators had sufficient evidence to pull the firearms license for Baltimore Gunsmith, the South Broadway shop targeted by police as one of the most prolific sources of guns used in Baltimore crimes. Owner Larry DiMartino had charged in a federal lawsuit last year that ATF officials violated his due process rights by acting as "investigator, charging party, prosecutor and deciding entity" in pulling his firearms license.
NEWS
January 6, 2001
WHEN A STORE has been in business for 96 years, it acquires a reputation. Baltimore Gunsmith Co. surely has: Twenty percent of the firearms seized in city crimes over the past nine years -- a total of more than 1,000 weapons -- were bought at the upper Fells Point shop. Despite this link, city and federal officials failed for years in their efforts to close down this gun supplier for criminals. That's why the recent ruling of U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz is so important: He denied the gun store owners' appeal for a license.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
Baltimore Gunsmith has been an institution on Broadway since the turn of the century, when Fells Point was a rough-and-tumble hangout for longshoremen who crowded its cobblestone streets and rowdy pubs.The shop still beckons with a prominent sign in the shape of a Colt revolver. "Since 1904, taking care of all your shooting needs," its promotional literature reads.But federal authorities want to close the store. They accuse the owners of saturating city streets with weapons by selling to people they know will hand over the guns to criminals -- an illegal act called a "straw purchase."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2000
A Fells Point gun shop owner, long targeted by law enforcement agencies as the most prolific source of guns used in Baltimore crimes, has sued federal authorities who pulled his license to sell firearms. The lawsuit, filed last month in U.S. District Court by the owner of Baltimore Gunsmith, Larry DiMartino, accuses the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms of acting as "investigator, charging party, prosecutor and deciding entity" during an administrative hearing in February. Federal officials declined to comment on the lawsuit but said they went after the store as part of a crackdown on illegal gun sales and after a proliferation of weapons traced to the shop turned up at city crime scenes.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
Baltimore Gunsmith has been an institution on Broadway since the turn of the century, when Fells Point was a rough-and-tumble hangout for longshoremen who crowded its cobblestone streets and rowdy pubs.The shop still beckons with a prominent sign in the shape of a Colt revolver. "Since 1904, taking care of all your shooting needs," its promotional literature reads.But federal authorities want to close the store. They accuse the owners of saturating city streets with weapons by selling to people they know will hand over the guns to criminals -- an illegal act called a "straw purchase."
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