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NEWS
November 7, 2012
In response to the editorial on guns in The Sun ("The missing issue: guns," Nov. 5) and a recent show on gun control on WYPR with Dan Rodricks interviewing Johns Hopkins professor Daniel Webster about a report by the Center for Gun Policy and research at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University: Kudos to The Sun, Mr. Rodricks, WYPR and Mr. Webster for bringing forth this discussion, one that is rarely heard in...
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NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | August 12, 2008
Gun owners in Baltimore whose firearms are stolen would be required to report the theft to police under legislation approved by the City Council yesterday - despite questions about whether the proposal is legal. Supporters, including Mayor Sheila Dixon, say the bill will help police track stolen weapons used in crimes, but the city's law department has questioned whether Baltimore can legislate gun control, typically a state issue. In a June memo on the bill, the law department recommended the City Council hold off on advancing the measure until the Maryland attorney general issues an opinion on the bill - but that opinion is not finished.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
One of the most popular topics for legislators today is restricting gun ownership in some form or fashion ("Guns: Old issue, new hurdles," Feb. 10). They have labeled some firearms as "assault" weapons and likened them to those used by the military. I spent 23 years in the U. S. Marine Corps, and I have never heard the term assault weapon used there. The fact is, the word "assault" is not an adjective. Second, only people who don't understand firearms believe that a gun purchased from a local firearms dealer has the same capability as those used by our military or police.
NEWS
By David Horsey | July 31, 2012
In the days following the Aurora theater massacre, gun sales in Colorado shot through the roof. But all the arms and ammo moving across gun shop counters are not being purchased in anticipation of another anonymous misfit springing out of nowhere with guns blazing. Instead, people are stocking their home armories to get ahead of new gun control laws that might restrict access to firearms. It seems not to make any difference to these people that there is zero chance that any new restrictions will be imposed, or that none are being seriously pondered by anyone who could make it happen, or that any law that might conceivably get through the solid bulwark of the gun lobby would not do anything significant to inhibit the right to keep and bear arms.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2003
Making her second impassioned plea for tougher gun control laws, the mother of one of last fall's sniper victims appeared before a Senate committee yesterday and described the pain of losing her son to gun violence. Sonia Wills, the mother of slain Montgomery County bus driver Conrad Johnson, urged the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee to support three measures that would require reporting of lost or stolen handguns, expand ballistic fingerprinting to include all firearms and ban all assault-style weapons such as the one allegedly used by the snipers to kill her son. "I am in Annapolis again today because I am still outraged," Wills said.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | March 5, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- A bill that requires Marylanders to store loaded guns out of the reach of children cleared the House of Delegates today.The House voted 85-47 to approve the Schaefer administration bill, which requires owners to store loaded guns in such a way that unsupervised children under age 16 can't gain access to them.The bill now goes to the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee, where it faces an uncertain future. The committee killed similar legislation last year, but proponents are more hopeful it will be enacted this year.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | May 14, 1991
The City Council last night gave preliminary approval to a bill that would require gun owners to keep their weapons under lock and key so they can't be used by minors.The bill, introduced by Councilman Anthony J. Ambridge, D-2nd, would require gun owners either to lock away firearms or to use trigger locks to render them inoperable. It also would make it unlawful to store a firearm and ammunition together. Violators could be fined up to $1,000 and/or be jailed for a year.The council tentatively approved the bill by a unanimous vote.
NEWS
June 9, 1998
THE NATIONAL Rifle Association has done itself a good turn by making Charlton Heston its president. Mr. Heston is a powerful actor who believes in the cause.Despite the stridence of what he said at the NRA's meeting in Philadelphia, Mr. Heston is a comparative moderate within the leadership of that organization. It fronts for the interests of gun manufacturers and distributors while purporting to speak for some 2.8 million hunting, target-shooting, farming, antique-collecting legitimate gun owners and enthusiasts.
NEWS
December 22, 2012
Guns are instruments of death. Their purpose is to kill, to bring an end to life. Yet we have romanticized these killing machines with shoot 'em up westerns, Sopranos entertainment, and clubs to kill animals. But let's face it, make no mistake about it, guns are anti-life. That is the brutal fact of the matter. The gun debate still ignores this simple fact, giving a nod to gun owners in a touchy-feely way because they want to kill animals for fun. Nobody wants to say what a friend of mine recently posted on his Facebook page: "Get another hobby.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Four weeks after Gov. Martin O'Malley's gun-control bill passed the Senate, a key House committee has yet to schedule a vote and continues to debate whether to scale it back. Among the possible changes still on the table: whether to take the AR-15 and a few other assault-style rifles off the list of guns whose sale would be banned. "We're still ruminating," said Del. Kathleen Dumais, vice chair of the House Judiciary Committee and a Democrat from Montgomery County. About a half-dozen lawmakers have been meeting once or twice a week behind closed doors to determine what changes -- if any -- they want to adopt to on a bill that would give Maryland some of the nation's strictest gun laws.
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