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By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
A federal judge rejected requests Tuesday to block Maryland's new ban on the sale of assault rifles and to prevent enforcement of a new handgun licensing program. In denying a temporary restraining order, U.S. District Judge Catherine Blake said the plaintiffs undercut their argument for an emergency suspension of the gun control law by waiting to challenge it until a few days before it took effect. "This suit could have been brought months ago, but it was not," Blake said. The constitutional challenge to the ban — and whether the Second Amendment guarantees the right to buy an assault-style rifle to protect one's home — will be the subject of a future hearing and remains to be decided.
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By Chris Mondics | November 5, 2000
WASHINGTON -- When hundreds of thousands of women rallied in May in Washington demanding tougher gun laws as part of the Million Mom March, many Democrats took it as an article of faith that growing national concern over gun violence would boost Al Gore in the race for the White House. After all, Gore had made tough new gun laws, including licensing new handgun owners, a central theme of his winning primary campaign against Bill Bradley, while George W. Bush had worked to relax gun laws in Texas.
NEWS
By Lori K. Brown | September 19, 2012
If you have been reading the Sun lately, you might think that September is National School Safety Month. "Reviewing safety plans in schools" was a recent front page headline, and a half-dozen similarly titled articles have filled the paper recently. Has there been an outbreak of running with scissors? Have students been forgetting safety goggles in wood shop? Is there an outbreak of bad crosswalk etiquette? Sadly, these stories aren't really about school safety, but instead address the troublingly difficult effort to keep guns out of the area's public schools in the aftermath of the two most recent school gun incidents.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 6, 1991
WASHINGTON -- About a year ago, the House handily rejected a bill to impose a seven-day waiting period on handgun purchases, instructing the Justice Department to study the issue instead.This Wednesday, lawmakers are supposed to vote on the very same issue. By all accounts, it's going to be a squeaker."The squeaker of squeakers," said the bill's author, Representative Edward F. Feighan, D-Ohio. "But I think the momentum's on our side."The politics of gun control appear to have been transformed from what they were just a year ago, and partisans on both sides say this week's vote could signify a new turn in the struggle to define an American's right to "keep and bear arms."
NEWS
By Laura Lippman Joe Nawrozki contributed to this story | February 7, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Sally Welch, whose 15-year-old son was shot and killed in a relative's home, wants Maryland legislators to know exactly what has changed since they killed a gun-safety bill last year.The bill has changed, as proponents respond to some of the criticisms that helped defeat it last year. The politics have changed, and a Senate committee that killed it a year ago may treat it more favorably.L But most important to Ms. Welch, nine more Maryland familieshave faced the same tragedy she experienced in 1988, with three children dying and six others suffering injuries in household gun accidents.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 24, 1991
A Mr. Larry Pratt writes to the editor of this newspaper with a gun at my head.Figuratively speaking, of course.Mr. Pratt asserts that he and I disagree over the killing of Charles "Eddie" Scheuerman, the Belair Road gun shop owner who was shot to death while surrounded by weapons of his own which he could not reach.Mr. Pratt declares himself sensitive and saddened by the shooting. For public consumption, he declares me full of delight over it.On this, he is revoltingly wrong and knows it.Mr.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | February 10, 1994
The television commercial depicts a plainclothes investigator with the Motor Vehicle Administration -- a secret agent, if you will -- sneaking up to a parked car in order to remove its tags. "Don't let this happen to you!" intones an announcer in a doomsday voice. The commercial is for an area automobile insurance company, warning us of what can happen to motorists who drive uninsured."You guys don't really do stuff like that, do you?" I ask a spokesman for the state Motor Vehicle Administration.
NEWS
By Brian E. Frosh | September 30, 2013
When the Maryland Firearm Safety Act goes into effect tomorrow, it will close a gaping hole in our gun violence prevention efforts by requiring firearm purchasers to provide their fingerprints to law enforcement. In the five other states where this policy is already in place, rates of gun-related deaths are among the nation's lowest. We need to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous criminals. Background checks have done this so effectively that few criminals nowadays just walk into a store to purchase a gun. Instead, they ask a friend, a relative or even a fellow gang member with no prior record to buy the weapon for them.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2003
Making her second impassioned plea for tougher gun control laws, the mother of one of last fall's sniper victims appeared before a Senate committee yesterday and described the pain of losing her son to gun violence. Sonia Wills, the mother of slain Montgomery County bus driver Conrad Johnson, urged the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee to support three measures that would require reporting of lost or stolen handguns, expand ballistic fingerprinting to include all firearms and ban all assault-style weapons such as the one allegedly used by the snipers to kill her son. "I am in Annapolis again today because I am still outraged," Wills said.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | August 12, 2008
Gun owners in Baltimore whose firearms are stolen would be required to report the theft to police under legislation approved by the City Council yesterday - despite questions about whether the proposal is legal. Supporters, including Mayor Sheila Dixon, say the bill will help police track stolen weapons used in crimes, but the city's law department has questioned whether Baltimore can legislate gun control, typically a state issue. In a June memo on the bill, the law department recommended the City Council hold off on advancing the measure until the Maryland attorney general issues an opinion on the bill - but that opinion is not finished.
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