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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 14, 1999
As cities prepare to sue the gun industry for not taking steps to keep their products out of criminals' hands, critics of the industry are building an argument that gun makers began making more powerful handguns to make up for stagnant sales and that these guns quickly became popular among criminals.While the marketing innovation increased the gun makers' profits, critics contend, it also helped account for the rise in homicides in the 1980s and the greater seriousness of gunshot wounds in recent years.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
A federal jury in New York City made history last night, finding some of America's largest firearms manufacturers responsible for three shooting crimes in a landmark verdict that might lead to greater controls on the flow of guns into cities such as Baltimore.Despite hundreds of civil claims filed against gun makers over the past two decades, no gun maker has been found liable for damages in a lawsuit deriving from the criminal use of firearms -- until yesterday. In fact, the case, brought by the families of seven New York shooting victims against 15 gun companies, was one of the few to survive dismissal motions and reach a jury.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- Kicking off the biggest legal test yet for the gun industry, a lawyer for seven New York families shattered by violence delivered her opening statement here yesterday in a closely watched civil lawsuit against 30 of America's firearms manufacturers.Elisa Barnes, who operates from a cluttered Greenwich Village office, told a jury of 10 women and two men that gun makers have created a public nuisance nationwide by saturating some areas with more handguns than they can reasonably expect to sell to law-abiding purchasers.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1998
The mayor of Boston said yesterday that the city's police department will attach child-proof combination locks to the service weapons of all 2,247 police officers, making Boston the first big city in the nation to require locks and training in their use.Mayor Thomas M. Menino and his police commissioner, Paul Evans, said in a morning news conference that by mandating locks on police guns they hope to protect the officers and their families from being shot...
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1998
Taking aim at the nation's mayors, a prominent gun owners organization issued a threat yesterday to Baltimore and the dozens of other cities considering suits against America's firearms manufacturers: If you sue gun makers, we'll sue you.Officials with the Second Amendment Foundation, a Bellevue, Wash., group that claims 600,000 gun owners as members, say they have begun drawing up lawsuits against New Orleans and Chicago. This fall, those two cities became the first to pursue the gun makers in court, where they seek damages for the police, emergency and medical costs associated with gun violence.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1998
CHICAGO -- Firing back at the urban plague of gun violence, lawyers and mayors from 13 U.S. cities held a first-of-its kind summit here yesterday to plot strategy for what promises to be a joint legal assault against America's firearms manufacturers.The afternoon meeting, over plates of chicken and rice at a 911 communications center on Chicago's West Side, came at the urging of the mayors of New Orleans and Chicago, which last month became the first two cities to file lawsuits against gun makers.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1998
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday he is exploring a lawsuit against America's firearms manufacturers, a move that would add Baltimore to a platoon of cities targeting gun-makers for the police, emergency and court costs resulting from gun violence.Yesterday, lawyers for the city of Chicago filed a $433 million lawsuit against gun companies, alleging they are intentionally saturating the city with more handguns than they can reasonably expect to sell to law-abiding citizens.Two weeks ago, New Orleans filed the nation's first lawsuit by a government against the industry, accusing gun manufacturers of failing to include adequate safety features.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 7, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With gun control a dead letter in Congress, anti-gun activists have increasingly turned to the courts to foil firearms manufacturers and sellers and have made halting strides toward holding the industry liable for its sometimes-deadly product.But a liability bill before the Senate this week could slam that door shut, gun control advocates fear. Republicans and Democrats have struck a compromise on legislation designed to protect businesses -- especially small businesses -- from liability lawsuits that cost companies billions of dollars a year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- After quietly negotiating with the Clinton administration, the manufacturers of most handguns in the United States plan to gather today at the White House to announce that they will provide child-safety locks with their firearms by the end of next year, a senior White House official and a representative of the gun-makers said yesterday.The announcement, which will ensure that about 80 percent of handguns made in the United States are sold with locks, is expected to produce the unlikely spectacle of President Clinton, who has sought throughout his presidency to restrict access to firearms, standing in the Rose Garden beside executives from more than a half-dozen gun-makers.
NEWS
By San Francisco Chronicle | April 12, 1995
SAN FRANCISCO -- A San Francisco judge's decision to allow wrongful-death suits against manufacturers of assault weapons could turn into a legal nightmare, gun manufacturers warned yesterday.Lawyers for victims and firearms groups agreed that the unprecedented ruling on Monday is likely to lead to a surge of lawsuits against gun producers.Ernest Getto, the Los Angeles attorney for the gun maker who was sued, said the judge's decision could be used against the manufacturer of "any product that could be used lethally."
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