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NEWS
By Cheryl Hystad and Susan Peschin | October 24, 2002
THE SNIPER attacks in the Washington area and Virginia have all of us on edge and many wondering if there is anything we can do as individuals in response to this ongoing tragedy. The feeling of helplessness is nearly worse than the fear generated by the attacks. Is there something we can do besides canceling our children's soccer games and field trips? There is no question that the one or more individuals who have committed these random killings should be held responsible and brought to justice.
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NEWS
March 6, 2013
The state of California treats all businesses as necessary evils and treat those of us in the gun business as simply evil. It makes it very clear that it doesn't want us there. Beretta is now considering moving 400 jobs out of Maryland for the same reason ("Gun control draws more than 2,000 to Annapolis," March 2). Recall that the company already moved a warehouse to Virginia in 1990 when Maryland tightened gun laws. Why would the General Assembly knowingly force out legitimate businesses and jobs from Maryland?
BUSINESS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Maryland's largest gun manufacturer has decided not to leave the state just yet. Beretta USA threatened to abandon its home on the Potomac if Maryland passed a strict new gun-control law, but after the law was signed the company announced that its operations would remain in Prince George's County for now. However, Beretta added, it would look elsewhere for future expansions. Beretta and another Maryland gun maker have taken a wait-and-see approach to leaving the state, balancing the risk of a customer backlash against the cost and difficulty of a possible move, while keeping up with unprecedented demand for guns of all kinds.
NEWS
January 29, 2014
Dan Rodricks ' column on the Columbia Mall shooting was a refreshing bit of honesty with all of the bark on ( "Expecting the horrible is the American way," Jan. 25). I am personally tired of the candles-and-teddy bear rituals featuring politicians talking about communities "coming together. " A deeply pathological love for guns has infected the United States. If we are ever going to stop this senseless killing, it will require that Americans realize just how sick we are to allow, much less glorify, a surfeit of killing power in our homes, on our streets and where we work, shop, worship and send our children to school.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | May 29, 1991
HERE'S a film of five low-lifers beating and robbing a man in the street. One of the five filmed it himself with a video camera. It shows how far people will go nowadays to get on television.The film was shown in a Washington courtroom where the cinematographer and his cast are on trial for assault and robbery. Fragments of it shown on TV stations there featured a punch to the jaw that left one pedestrian unconscious and a brief sequence in which one assailant urinated on the fallen man's face.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 27, 2005
WASHINGTON - In a sign of the changing political calculus of gun control, the Senate appears poised to pass a top priority of the National Rifle Association this week, legislation that would shield the gun industry from lawsuits arising from the misuse of their weapons. Gun manufacturers have pressed for years for such a law, arguing that it is needed to protect them from lawsuits filed by municipalities or individuals that the industry says could bankrupt it. Dozens of such lawsuits are pending.
NEWS
June 1, 1999
Governor was right to veto state's Y2K legislationThe Sun's editorial condemning Gov.nor Parris N. Glendening's veto of the private sector Year 2000 computer problem (Y2K) legislation ignores both the law and logic ("Dangerous Y2K veto," May 22).The editorial argues that this veto leaves conscientious businesses with no protection from lawsuits. Current law, however, provides protection for any business that has acted reasonably to address its Y2K issues.The law always judges actions in the context of reasonableness.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1998
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday he is exploring a lawsuit against America's firearms manufacturers, a move that would add Baltimore to a platoon of cities targeting gun-makers for the police, emergency and court costs resulting from gun violence.Yesterday, lawyers for the city of Chicago filed a $433 million lawsuit against gun companies, alleging they are intentionally saturating the city with more handguns than they can reasonably expect to sell to law-abiding citizens.Two weeks ago, New Orleans filed the nation's first lawsuit by a government against the industry, accusing gun manufacturers of failing to include adequate safety features.
TOPIC
By Martin P. Welch | March 19, 2000
Last year's rampage at Columbine High School, the nation's worst schoolhouse shooting spree, left America numb and hoping such senseless killings would end. They haven't. Recently, a 6-year-old Michigan boy took a handgun to school and killed a classmate; a 7-year-old Alabama boy fatally shot a 5-year-old neighbor with an air gun loaded with pellets or BB shot; a man shot and killed three victims near Pittsburgh in an apparent hate crime; a Memphis gunman reportedly killed four people at a fire scene; and recently in Baltimore County, a mentally disturbed man allegedly shot and killed four people.
NEWS
July 20, 1999
Domestic abuse takes toll, suggests further violence likelyThe Sun's editorial "Hate holds a gun to the nation" (July 7) neglected to mention one other indicator of Benjamin Smith's (the racist killer who went on a shooting spree in the Midwest) violent nature: His record of domestic or dating violence.He was the respondent in a court order of protection for a former girlfriend. The evidence against him must have been convincing because the judge granted his estranged girlfriend two years of protection in April 1998.
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