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NEWS
August 7, 2013
I shouldn't be surprised with your one-sided editorial ( "Maryland's reckless gun dealers," Aug. 5). Did Dan Rodricks write this screed? It sounds like his one-sided tripe. For what it's worth, our elected officials are responsible for all these problems, especially Gov. Martin O'Malley. If they had kept their opinions to themselves instead of making more laws that won't do anything, we would never be in this predicament. The backlog of people wanting to buy handguns and assault-type rifles started back when President Barack Obama won his first election.
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NEWS
January 17, 2014
I'm sorry, but what caused firearms to fall into the wrong hands was certainly not "gun lobby hysteria," as your editorial recently claimed ( "Panicking over Md.'s gun law," Jan. 13). Instead, it was a result of Maryland's oppressive new "sweeping reform" of gun laws and of gun dealers abiding by the law that states a firearm can be released to the buyer once the background check is completed within the legally required seven days. It was the government that was unable to comply with the law. The firearms fell into the wrong hands because the state was overreaching and the infrastructure was not prepared.
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NEWS
August 2, 2013
Here's the scary thing about the news that the Maryland State Police has found 30 cases in which gun dealers decided not to wait for the state to complete a background check and handed firearms to people whose criminal histories made them ineligible to own them: It's almost certainly just the tip of the iceberg. For the sake of public safety and any pretense they have to moral authority, gun dealers must immediately stop releasing guns before background checks are complete. The number of applications for firearms purchases has risen to unprecedented levels since the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., in December and the ensuing push for tighter gun laws in Maryland and elsewhere.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
Your editorial blaming Maryland gun dealers for the state's delay in conducting background checks on prospective buyers was absolutely absurd ( "Panicking over Md.'s gun law," Jan. 13). The state wrote the requirements, waiting periods and time frame that allowed gun dealers to release legally purchased guns to buyers. It wasn't the dealers who created whose unenforceable procedures. It was wholly a state responsibility. The blame lies totally with the regulating body, not the dealers or buyers.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
Over the last few weeks we have witnessed the rallying cry from our elected leaders, both locally and nationally, for the need for more restrictive gun control (smaller magazine clips, banning certain "assault" weapons, etc.). The liberal left seems to hold the patent on exploiting current events to further their political agenda, and they're following the playbook step by step to further erode our right to bear arms, guaranteed to us in the Second Amendment. Some of the pro-gun control letters published in The Sun question why any hunter would need a so called "assault weapon" to go hunting, or they claim that our forefathers only intended the amendment to be about muskets and single shot rifles, because that's what was around back then.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
When Scott Schulte stopped at Pasadena Pawn and Gun last week to pick up his fifth firearm of the year, the Maryland State Police still hadn't finished his background check. The store let him take the pistol anyway. "I figure I can use my discretion," owner Frank Loane Sr. told Schulte. "I know you. " An unprecedented surge of applications to purchase guns has overwhelmed Maryland's system for checking out the buyers. Dealers are required to wait seven days before releasing a firearm — which in the past has been enough time for the state police to complete the background check.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In a major step to curb the virtually unchecked growth of firearms dealers in the United States, the Clinton administration has begun requiring new applicants and those renewing their licenses to submit photographs and fingerprints and is asking them whether they are complying with local and state laws.Currently, only machine gun dealers -- a tiny fraction of the 266,000 licensed firearms dealers -- are required to produce photo IDs and fingerprints.The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, which regulates the gun industry, began mailing out the new four-page application form and a three-page questionnaire last week to new applicants and those wanting to renew their licenses.
NEWS
By STEVE HIGGINS AND REX DAVIS | June 2, 2005
WASHINGTON -Bull's Eye Shooter Supply - the Tacoma, Wash., gun store that armed the Washington, D.C.-area snipers - is the kind of bad-apple gun dealer that should be sanctioned, not protected, by the law. When John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo - both prohibited gun buyers under federal law - needed a sniper rifle to carry out their deadly rampage, they found the perfect store in Bull's Eye, a dealer unable to account for hundreds of missing guns...
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Jay Apperson contributed to this article | October 16, 1998
A fund-raising letter from the leader of a gun dealers group on behalf of Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey suggests that if elected governor, she would undo state gun-control regulations -- an appeal that has angered gun-control advocates and others.The August letter to gun dealers from Sanford Abrams, vice president of the Maryland Licensed Firearms Dealers Association Inc., calls Sauerbrey "the savior of our industry."Ellen Sauerbrey will not only veto any anti-gun legislation, but through regulations and executive orders can actually start to reverse the damage caused" during Gov. Parris N. Glendening's four-year term, Abrams wrote.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1996
The nationwide anxiety that spawned the 1994 federal crime bill wasn't aimed at Neil S. Kravitz's rural home business -- making special bullets for target shooters -- but it hit his bull's eye anyway.A minor provision requiring local police to ensure that people with federal gun dealers' licenses abide by all local laws, including zoning laws, is threatening to put Kravitz out of business.And he's upset."I just don't understand it," says Kravitz, who lives near Glyndon in Baltimore County.
NEWS
September 10, 2013
Gun advocates have been crying for close to two years about how long it takes the Maryland State Police to conduct background checks for prospective gun buyers. The delays have lengthened with the passage earlier this year of Gov. Martin O'Malley's gun control law that will impose a fingerprint and handgun qualification license requirement beginning Oct. 1. So naturally one would think that anything the MSP could do to reduce that waiting period - which is now in the neighborhood of four months - would be welcomed by gun owners and those who advocate for them.
NEWS
August 7, 2013
I shouldn't be surprised with your one-sided editorial ( "Maryland's reckless gun dealers," Aug. 5). Did Dan Rodricks write this screed? It sounds like his one-sided tripe. For what it's worth, our elected officials are responsible for all these problems, especially Gov. Martin O'Malley. If they had kept their opinions to themselves instead of making more laws that won't do anything, we would never be in this predicament. The backlog of people wanting to buy handguns and assault-type rifles started back when President Barack Obama won his first election.
NEWS
August 6, 2013
I commend Dan Rodricks ' "Gun-buying frenzy in a summer of violence" (Aug. 4) for pointing out irresponsible gun dealers betraying public safety and the irony of the mad gun rush versus Baltimore's struggles with gun violence. But it doesn't end there. The demand for guns has increased, but to a paranoid pitch. People who have never owned a gun or had training are racing for an AR-15 like their favorite brand of candy is being discontinued. After working on this issue through the legislative session, I do not blame the administration or Maryland State Police for the backlog, I blame Marylanders.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 2, 2013
When it comes to guns, there's Baltimore and there's the rest of Maryland. The city has a horrible problem with guns; the rest of the state can't seem to get enough of them. In Baltimore, people are marching against gun violence; in the rest of the state, they're lining up to buy guns by the thousands. Some gun dealers have been so eager to move inventory this year that they've sold weapons to people with criminal records. Indeed, with our largest city suffering through a summer of almost daily gun violence, Marylanders are in the midst of a gun-buying frenzy.
NEWS
August 2, 2013
Here's the scary thing about the news that the Maryland State Police has found 30 cases in which gun dealers decided not to wait for the state to complete a background check and handed firearms to people whose criminal histories made them ineligible to own them: It's almost certainly just the tip of the iceberg. For the sake of public safety and any pretense they have to moral authority, gun dealers must immediately stop releasing guns before background checks are complete. The number of applications for firearms purchases has risen to unprecedented levels since the school shooting in Newtown, Conn., in December and the ensuing push for tighter gun laws in Maryland and elsewhere.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
I just finished your article about how Maryland ranks third nationally in number of guns lost or stolen by gun dealers, and it just doesn't make any sense ("Report: Md. has 3 r d -most guns lost, stolen," June 19). How exactly does a business owner go about "losing" his inventory without being a complete moron, not just as a business owner but as a human being? I've run my own business for 25 years and I have never managed to lose a single item on my inventory - and I run a race team that regularly packs all of our stuff into a trailer that I drag all over the country.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1998
The new national system of instant background checks for potential firearms purchasers is living up to its name after all.After an ignominious start marred by long delays and a midday shutdown when the system was introduced Nov. 30, Maryland gun dealers say most reviews by the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (or NICS) are being completed in a couple of minutes.While some dealers describe the system as intrusive and unnecessary, they have largely muted the anger and frustration they expressed on the first day, when they were unable to make sales of shotguns and rifles because they could not complete the calls needed to make the checks.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 23, 1999
Exploding a long-held myth about stolen guns and the violent street culture they spawn, a new federal study reveals that a large number of guns seized in Baltimore and other cities are bought legally and quickly handed over to criminals.The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms said its findings show that criminals do not have to forage for stolen, older-model guns. Rather, with the acquiescence of corrupt gun dealers, middlemen help criminals obtain new firearms without having to pay higher street-level prices.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
Maryland ranks near the top of the nation in the number of firearms its federally licensed gun dealers report as lost or stolen, according to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, a distinction far out of proportion to the state's size or rate of firearm ownership. The question is how many were actually lost and how many were "lost" by dishonest gun dealers looking to sell off the books to people who couldn't qualify to buy a weapon. We do not mean to impugn gun dealers generally.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Nearly 1,000 guns were reported lost or stolen from federally licensed gun dealers in Maryland last year, the third-highest number of any state in the country, according to a federal report released this week. Gun dealers in the state reported 886 lost guns and 98 stolen guns in 2012, according to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. Pennsylvania had the most guns reported stolen or lost from dealers, about 1,500, while Texas had more than 1,200 such thefts or losses.
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