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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
There's a new exhibit waiting to greet summer visitors at Delaware's Cape Henlopen State Park. And it's big. It's a 16-inch gun barrel that once roared from the deck of the battleship Missouri during World War II, and it now rests — 120 tons, 68 feet long — at the Battery 519 Museum at Fort Miles, which is part of Cape Henlopen State Park. The gun — officially known as Barrel 371 — arrived at Fort Miles last month. It is similar to the two 16-inch Army guns that defended the coast and the Delaware Bay from German U-boats.
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EXPLORE
Letter to The Record | March 7, 2013
The following letter was sent to Maryland State Senator Barry Glassman. A copy was provided for publication. I write regarding the Second Amendment debate in Annapolis. I applaud your stand in defending the Constitution. Perhaps my experiences may help you frame some response to folks who have never carried a gun or faced one, in why merely the presence of a gun can save lives. I am 62, a small farm-owner in Forest Hill, retired from the gas station business, where carrying a revolver saved my life several times, though I never fired a shot in 20 years.
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SPORTS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
A Dominican prosecutor handling the case of Orioles reliever Alfredo Simon said Wednesday the "trigger-happy" pitcher might have changed the barrel of a gun he turned over to authorities as a way of disguising his involvement in a fatal New Year's Day shooting. Victor Mueses, the chief prosecutor in Puerto Plata, where Simon remained in custody after surrendering to authorities Monday, said the serial number on the weapon's barrel does not match numbers on the rest of the gun and suggested that the 29-year-old reliever might have swapped the original barrel for another at some point between the shooting and his surrender two days later.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
There's a new exhibit waiting to greet summer visitors at Delaware's Cape Henlopen State Park. And it's big. It's a 16-inch gun barrel that once roared from the deck of the battleship Missouri during World War II, and it now rests — 120 tons, 68 feet long — at the Battery 519 Museum at Fort Miles, which is part of Cape Henlopen State Park. The gun — officially known as Barrel 371 — arrived at Fort Miles last month. It is similar to the two 16-inch Army guns that defended the coast and the Delaware Bay from German U-boats.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 1, 2005
These eyes ain't what they used to be, especially in the minutes before the sun pops up and again just after it slides beneath the horizon. Short of getting Superman's X-ray vision for Christmas, I need a little illumination when baiting a hook, checking a birding guide or loading up a canoe. That used to mean tucking a flashlight under one arm or gripping a little penlight between my teeth. Now, I clip a little Bil-Lite sport utility light to my cap and away I go (I even use it when attempting to thread a needle or fire up the grill)
EXPLORE
Letter to The Record | March 7, 2013
The following letter was sent to Maryland State Senator Barry Glassman. A copy was provided for publication. I write regarding the Second Amendment debate in Annapolis. I applaud your stand in defending the Constitution. Perhaps my experiences may help you frame some response to folks who have never carried a gun or faced one, in why merely the presence of a gun can save lives. I am 62, a small farm-owner in Forest Hill, retired from the gas station business, where carrying a revolver saved my life several times, though I never fired a shot in 20 years.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 10, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- He had survived the Iraqis only to have his fellow Kuwaitis shoot up his car, try to kill him and hold him to the ground with a gun barrel in his ear, the outraged young man said."
NEWS
By Dan Stober and Dan Stober,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 25, 1992
LIVERMORE, Calif. -- In the dusty hills east of Livermore, physicist John Hunter is working toward a $3 billion supergun two miles long that will hurl payloads to the moon.His first scaled-down, $4 million test version of the gun is nearly done. Its barrel, half a football field long, is the longest of any known gun in the world. Its first firing in September will be somewhat more modest than a space launch, flinging an 11-pound piece of plastic at 9,000 mph into a pile of sandbags.But to Mr. Hunter, it's a big step.
NEWS
By Brendan Walsh | September 2, 2008
He pointed the gun in my face a few minutes before 5 a.m. . The gun was similar to the ones carried by the police. He was maybe 15 or 16 years old, and he mumbled, "This is for real," or something similar. I had just started my daily two-mile exercise walk around Union Square Park on a recent Tuesday. When you walk at 5 a.m., you escape the heat and the dangerous rays of the sun. When the young man stopped me, I was directly across the street from the front door of Steuart Hill Academic Academy, the school where Mayor Sheila Dixon once taught.
FEATURES
By ROGER SIMON and ROGER SIMON,Roger Simon is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Sun. This excerpt is from his new book, "Road Show," published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Copyright 1990 by Roger Simon. Reprinted with permission | November 11, 1990
"By the time we're finished, they're going to wonder whether Willie Horton is Dukakis' running mate."--Lee AtwaterHe was big. He was black. He was every guy you ever crossed street to avoid, every pair of smoldering eyes you ever looked away from on the bus or subway. He was every person you moved out of the city to escape, every sound in the night that made you get up and check the locks on the windows and grab the door handles and give them an extra tug.Whether you were white or black or red or yellow, Willie Horton was your worst nightmare.
SPORTS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
A Dominican prosecutor handling the case of Orioles reliever Alfredo Simon said Wednesday the "trigger-happy" pitcher might have changed the barrel of a gun he turned over to authorities as a way of disguising his involvement in a fatal New Year's Day shooting. Victor Mueses, the chief prosecutor in Puerto Plata, where Simon remained in custody after surrendering to authorities Monday, said the serial number on the weapon's barrel does not match numbers on the rest of the gun and suggested that the 29-year-old reliever might have swapped the original barrel for another at some point between the shooting and his surrender two days later.
NEWS
By Brendan Walsh | September 2, 2008
He pointed the gun in my face a few minutes before 5 a.m. . The gun was similar to the ones carried by the police. He was maybe 15 or 16 years old, and he mumbled, "This is for real," or something similar. I had just started my daily two-mile exercise walk around Union Square Park on a recent Tuesday. When you walk at 5 a.m., you escape the heat and the dangerous rays of the sun. When the young man stopped me, I was directly across the street from the front door of Steuart Hill Academic Academy, the school where Mayor Sheila Dixon once taught.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 1, 2005
These eyes ain't what they used to be, especially in the minutes before the sun pops up and again just after it slides beneath the horizon. Short of getting Superman's X-ray vision for Christmas, I need a little illumination when baiting a hook, checking a birding guide or loading up a canoe. That used to mean tucking a flashlight under one arm or gripping a little penlight between my teeth. Now, I clip a little Bil-Lite sport utility light to my cap and away I go (I even use it when attempting to thread a needle or fire up the grill)
NEWS
By Dan Stober and Dan Stober,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 25, 1992
LIVERMORE, Calif. -- In the dusty hills east of Livermore, physicist John Hunter is working toward a $3 billion supergun two miles long that will hurl payloads to the moon.His first scaled-down, $4 million test version of the gun is nearly done. Its barrel, half a football field long, is the longest of any known gun in the world. Its first firing in September will be somewhat more modest than a space launch, flinging an 11-pound piece of plastic at 9,000 mph into a pile of sandbags.But to Mr. Hunter, it's a big step.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 10, 1991
KUWAIT CITY -- He had survived the Iraqis only to have his fellow Kuwaitis shoot up his car, try to kill him and hold him to the ground with a gun barrel in his ear, the outraged young man said."
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Dennis O'Brien and Gail Gibson and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
The frustrating search for a serial sniper in the Washington region has renewed calls for a national ballistic fingerprint system that supporters say could quickly link bullets found at shooting scenes to a suspect. Such a system would appear to offer a quick fix in cases such as the mysterious shooter who in the past two weeks has killed eight people and wounded two, apparently leaving behind little evidence except for scattered bullet fragments. But some weapons experts say a program to "fingerprint" guns before they are sold - which is likely to be expensive and politically charged - also would be far from foolproof.
EXPLORE
January 11, 2012
Maryland State Police arrested a Sykesville man and a juvenile for pointing what they described as "a very realistic, but toy gun" at a motorist while driving on Route 97 in Westminster on Wednesday, Jan. 11. Shortly after 2 p.m., a driver contacted state police at the Westminster Barrack to report that she was behind an older model blue Buick on Route 97 near Westminster High School when a passenger in the vehicle rolled the window down, leaned...
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