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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 1, 1992
The Baltimore Film Forum couldn't have chosen a better movie to open its 23rd annual International Film Festival than Julie Dash's brilliant and shimmering "Daughters of the Dust." The film will be shown tonight at 8:30 at the Senator Theatre -- just the screen on which to enjoy such a visual feast."Daughters of the Dust" is a re-creation of a lost culture and a lost time, yet done with such love and passion that what has vanished forever now seems timeless. It's a story of the Gullah people of the Sea Islands off the coast of Georgia and South Carolina.
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By Mike Giuliano | February 22, 2012
If most plays about race tackle that touchy topic in literally black-and-white terms, Dael Orlandersmith's 2002 play "Yellowman" favors shades of black. Brace yourself as the playwright's skin-deep insights soon go deeper in a fine Rep Stage production. For all its thematic integrity, there are times when Orlandersmith's socially pointed, two-character drama seems on the verge of becoming overly didactic and static. Bear with her play's message-on-the-sleeve passages, however, because its dramatic substance comes across in the most crucial scenes.
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By Harry Shattuck and Harry Shattuck,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | April 22, 2001
It was home to the first school for black freedmen in the aftermath of the Civil War. A century later, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and other visionaries gathered here frequently to forge paths of understanding and togetherness. Today, the Penn Center on St. Helena Island, S.C., remains an inspiration -- a standing symbol of hope, perseverance and pride -- as well as a place for African-Americans to celebrate their culture and its roots. For travelers, the center's York W. Bailey Museum represents the perfect introduction to Gullah, as people on this small island, almost all of African descent, know their language and culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
There's a new low-country cuisine joint in Baltimore. It's called Low Country Kitchen, but just try to find it. Unless you had a good reason to be walking past Hannah Williams' new take-out joint, you might never see it. It's in Old Town, more specifically the Old Town Mall, which has seen much better days. But the opening of Low Country Kitchen might be the spark the once thriving commercial center has been watiing for. Williams thinks so. There's almost no competition around for blocks, and although there are fewer than a handful of remaining businesses on Old Town Hall, foot traffic is heavy in the morning, especially with students and workers rushing to their morning buses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
There's a new low-country cuisine joint in Baltimore. It's called Low Country Kitchen, but just try to find it. Unless you had a good reason to be walking past Hannah Williams' new take-out joint, you might never see it. It's in Old Town, more specifically the Old Town Mall, which has seen much better days. But the opening of Low Country Kitchen might be the spark the once thriving commercial center has been watiing for. Williams thinks so. There's almost no competition around for blocks, and although there are fewer than a handful of remaining businesses on Old Town Hall, foot traffic is heavy in the morning, especially with students and workers rushing to their morning buses.
TRAVEL
By Ethan Goldberg | May 31, 2009
Charleston's rich history and culture challenge many stereotypes of the South. Founded in 1670, the "The Holy City" is known for its charm, religious tolerance and superb manners. Last year, Travel + Leisure magazine named Charleston one of the top 10 cities in the U.S. Here are five things to see and do: 1 Spy on Spoleto. Celebrate the Piccolo Spoleto Festival USA. Modeled after Italy's Festival of the Two Worlds, this annual 17-day arts and entertainment explosion seizes Charleston until June 7, hosting more than 700 music, dance, theatre, visual arts, and family events from around the world, including the opera Louise, the U.S. premiere of the play Don John, jazz singer Ren?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 1, 1992
The Baltimore Film Forum couldn't have chosen a better movie to open its 23d annual International Film Festival than Julie Dash's brilliant and shimmering "Daughters of the Dust." The film will be shown tonight at 8:30 at the Senator Theatre -- just the screen on which to enjoy such a visual feast."Daughters of the Dust" is a re-creation of a lost culture and a lost time, yet done with such love and passion that what has vanished forever now seems timeless. It's a story of the Gullah people of the Sea Islands off the coast of Georgia and South Carolina.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | February 22, 2012
If most plays about race tackle that touchy topic in literally black-and-white terms, Dael Orlandersmith's 2002 play "Yellowman" favors shades of black. Brace yourself as the playwright's skin-deep insights soon go deeper in a fine Rep Stage production. For all its thematic integrity, there are times when Orlandersmith's socially pointed, two-character drama seems on the verge of becoming overly didactic and static. Bear with her play's message-on-the-sleeve passages, however, because its dramatic substance comes across in the most crucial scenes.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | August 18, 1993
Washington -- What is another term for twilight besides ''dusk''? In parts of Virginia and Georgia, that's the time between late afternoon and early evening when the light is so dim that ''you can't tell a hawk from a buzzard.''That delightful tidbit comes to you courtesy of the Dictionary of American Regional English. It is the most remarkable work of lexicography since Samuel Johnson in 1755 produced his monumental Dictionary of the English Language.Today's Dr. Johnson is Frederic G. Cassidy, 86, emeritus professor of English at the University of Wisconsin.
NEWS
By CINDY STACY and CINDY STACY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2006
THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE THE South Carolina Lowcountry -- particularly St. Helena Island -- if you want to be immersed in communities of Gullah culture. Here is where generations of former slaves from West African coastal countries live, keeping their unique Gullah culture intact. IF YOU GO PENN CENTER INC.: 843-838-2432, penncenter.com, St. Helena Island, S.C. DIRECTIONS: Take Interstate 95 south to Exit 33 onto U.S. 17 north to U.S. 21 south. Go south through Beaufort to St. Helena Island.
TRAVEL
By Ethan Goldberg | May 31, 2009
Charleston's rich history and culture challenge many stereotypes of the South. Founded in 1670, the "The Holy City" is known for its charm, religious tolerance and superb manners. Last year, Travel + Leisure magazine named Charleston one of the top 10 cities in the U.S. Here are five things to see and do: 1 Spy on Spoleto. Celebrate the Piccolo Spoleto Festival USA. Modeled after Italy's Festival of the Two Worlds, this annual 17-day arts and entertainment explosion seizes Charleston until June 7, hosting more than 700 music, dance, theatre, visual arts, and family events from around the world, including the opera Louise, the U.S. premiere of the play Don John, jazz singer Ren?
NEWS
By CINDY STACY and CINDY STACY,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2006
THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE THE South Carolina Lowcountry -- particularly St. Helena Island -- if you want to be immersed in communities of Gullah culture. Here is where generations of former slaves from West African coastal countries live, keeping their unique Gullah culture intact. IF YOU GO PENN CENTER INC.: 843-838-2432, penncenter.com, St. Helena Island, S.C. DIRECTIONS: Take Interstate 95 south to Exit 33 onto U.S. 17 north to U.S. 21 south. Go south through Beaufort to St. Helena Island.
TRAVEL
By Harry Shattuck and Harry Shattuck,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | April 22, 2001
It was home to the first school for black freedmen in the aftermath of the Civil War. A century later, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and other visionaries gathered here frequently to forge paths of understanding and togetherness. Today, the Penn Center on St. Helena Island, S.C., remains an inspiration -- a standing symbol of hope, perseverance and pride -- as well as a place for African-Americans to celebrate their culture and its roots. For travelers, the center's York W. Bailey Museum represents the perfect introduction to Gullah, as people on this small island, almost all of African descent, know their language and culture.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | August 18, 1993
Washington -- What is another term for twilight besides ''dusk''? In parts of Virginia and Georgia, that's the time between late afternoon and early evening when the light is so dim that ''you can't tell a hawk from a buzzard.''That delightful tidbit comes to you courtesy of the Dictionary of American Regional English. It is the most remarkable work of lexicography since Samuel Johnson in 1755 produced his monumental Dictionary of the English Language.Today's Dr. Johnson is Frederic G. Cassidy, 86, emeritus professor of English at the University of Wisconsin.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 1, 1992
The Baltimore Film Forum couldn't have chosen a better movie to open its 23d annual International Film Festival than Julie Dash's brilliant and shimmering "Daughters of the Dust." The film will be shown tonight at 8:30 at the Senator Theatre -- just the screen on which to enjoy such a visual feast."Daughters of the Dust" is a re-creation of a lost culture and a lost time, yet done with such love and passion that what has vanished forever now seems timeless. It's a story of the Gullah people of the Sea Islands off the coast of Georgia and South Carolina.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 1, 1992
The Baltimore Film Forum couldn't have chosen a better movie to open its 23rd annual International Film Festival than Julie Dash's brilliant and shimmering "Daughters of the Dust." The film will be shown tonight at 8:30 at the Senator Theatre -- just the screen on which to enjoy such a visual feast."Daughters of the Dust" is a re-creation of a lost culture and a lost time, yet done with such love and passion that what has vanished forever now seems timeless. It's a story of the Gullah people of the Sea Islands off the coast of Georgia and South Carolina.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | November 28, 1999
Have you ever seen a children's show on commercial television that told kids not to buy the stuff they see advertised on TV? I never had -- until I screened the pilot for "Little Bill," a new prime-time animated series created by Bill Cosby that premieres tonight at 8 on the Nickelodeon cable channel."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 12, 1994
Los Angeles -- Look out, Barney and Big Bird. The Frog Scouts, the "We-Did-It-Ourselves" Piggies and "Gullah Gullah Island" are on the way.That's the message Nickelodeon, the cable network for kids, delivered here yesterday as it unveiled details of a $30 million campaign to win the hearts and minds of pre-school viewers now mainly devoted to PBS.Nickelodeon's game plan, which begins this fall, looks a lot like the one that works so well for Public Television...
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