Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGulfport
IN THE NEWS

Gulfport

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Robert Little | September 4, 2005
The residents of Gulfport, Miss., picked through the wreckage of their city in silence. They climbed over stacks of splintered lumber and shattered furniture, scraped soggy paper and housing insulation off their shoes, and wandered across a sunlit waterfront none of them recognized. The scene was as solemn as a funeral service until from a far corner of the city's shipping terminal, a cry for help rang out Tuesday. About a dozen people ran toward the wailing, seeking its source. Then they found it: an adult sea lion, escaped from the city's ruined aquarium, nestled against an overturned tractor near a bubbling sewer drain.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,sun reporter | August 27, 2006
GULFPORT, Miss. -- She lived in this house for 35 years before Hurricane Katrina banished Mary Spinks Thigpen to a government-issued trailer in the front yard and left the salvaged pieces of her old life - the wedding photos, the holiday cards, the church song books - crammed in plastic bins stacked along the porch, threatened again each time it rains. Across the street, Charles and Virginia James are living in the driveway of the home they moved to in 1969. Through the windows of their trailer, another on loan from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the couple watch the slow restoration of the house where they raised five children and used to linger on the back porch after she finished her morning route as a school bus driver.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Karl Merton Ferron | September 4, 2005
The woman, in her 60s, approached after seeing the Texas license plates on my rental car. Her son lived there, and she was worried. Her town, Gulfport, had been slammed by the hurricane. Texas wasn't touched. But she was worried that her son was probably worried about her, and she hadn't been able to get in touch with him. Wearing blue jean shorts, flip-flops and a gray T-shirt, she broke into tears -- the first time, she said, since the hurricane struck. Her son, a military man, was stationed in Texas.
NEWS
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 8, 2005
GULFPORT, Miss. - At the Sun Suites Hotel yesterday, manager Mike Williams was grateful for small favors. None of the 128 rooms had electricity. A foul smell wafted from a mound of trash six feet tall in the parking lot. The roof was damaged and the elevator shaft had been ripped out in Hurricane Katrina. But yesterday morning, the hotel got water. It wasn't fit to drink - authorities advised boiling it for an hour - but at least when Williams turned on the taps, water flowed. "The water pressure's real good - on the first floor," he said.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker | September 4, 2005
Close to midnight on Wednesday, my first day in Gulfport, I was hopelessly lost, low on gas, without cell phone reception or a place to stay and closer to hysteria than I'd like to admit. I pulled my rental car over at what looked like a police outpost and asked the first officer I saw if I could sleep in the parking lot. He gave me a long, molasses-slow look. "What have you eaten today?" he asked. Crackers and Tootsie Rolls, I answered. "Come with me," he said. We went to his patrol car, and he opened the trunk where his personal supply of Army-issue meals ready to eat was stored.
NEWS
February 23, 2005
ALLEN "BIG AL" CONRAD, 53, of Long Beach, MS., died Friday, February 18, 2005 in Long Beach, MS. Big Al was born in Baltimore, Maryland and had been a resident of the coast for 30 years. He was retired from the US Navy and was a Vietnam Veteran. He was a member of the VNV/MC. He was preceded in death by his father, Ernest Conrad. He is survived by his Ol' Lady, Gayl "Angel" Tracy of Long Beach; his mother and stepfather, Frances and Joseph Houston of Joppa, Maryland; his son, Richard Le Normand of Gulfport; his daughter, Michelle Conrad of Gulfport; his brother, Michael Conrad of Baltimore, Maryland; and three grandchildren.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 9, 2000
GULFPORT, Miss. - Whether it's out of necessity or a desire for new wallpaper, women are heading to home improvement stores in growing numbers. "We probably get as many women as men customers," said Donna Guthrie, an employee of the Home Depot in Gulfport, Miss. "Basically, women are doing their own painting, tiling floors, doing minor plumbing repairs and hanging their own ceiling fans." A new survey by Home Depot and Yankelovich Partners found that more women (37 percent) would rather spend their weekend leisure time gardening or painting than shopping or strolling through a mall (28 percent)
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2005
GULFPORT, Miss. - Breena Estorffe sat on her front porch near the beach, happy to escape the hot sun, and pondered which of her neighbors on 36th Avenue might be dead. The elderly woman down the block was seen stumbling around in the rubble that Hurricane Katrina left behind, and so were the people in the yellow house across the street. But other houses were reduced to splinters, and the pink apartment complex near the beach had vanished completely. The only movement there was of animals and rescue workers searching for survivors - or bodies.
NEWS
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 8, 2005
GULFPORT, Miss. - At the Sun Suites Hotel yesterday, manager Mike Williams was grateful for small favors. None of the 128 rooms had electricity. A foul smell wafted from a mound of trash six feet tall in the parking lot. The roof was damaged and the elevator shaft had been ripped out in Hurricane Katrina. But yesterday morning, the hotel got water. It wasn't fit to drink - authorities advised boiling it for an hour - but at least when Williams turned on the taps, water flowed. "The water pressure's real good - on the first floor," he said.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | August 14, 1991
BILOXI, Miss. -- Donald Leroy Evans has told investigators that he killed more than 60 people in a 10-year rampage in 17 states, his attorney says.Fred Lusk, Evans' court-appointed attorney, said yesterday the count could go higher, but investigators "have what we believe is all he can recall in detail at the present time."Evans, 34, of Galveston, Texas, has claimed that he killed victims in Florida, Texas, Alabama, Arizona, California, Washington, Idaho, Colorado, Wyoming, Michigan, South Dakota, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, North and South Carolina, Illinois and maybe Georgia.
NEWS
By Karl Merton Ferron | September 4, 2005
The woman, in her 60s, approached after seeing the Texas license plates on my rental car. Her son lived there, and she was worried. Her town, Gulfport, had been slammed by the hurricane. Texas wasn't touched. But she was worried that her son was probably worried about her, and she hadn't been able to get in touch with him. Wearing blue jean shorts, flip-flops and a gray T-shirt, she broke into tears -- the first time, she said, since the hurricane struck. Her son, a military man, was stationed in Texas.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker | September 4, 2005
Close to midnight on Wednesday, my first day in Gulfport, I was hopelessly lost, low on gas, without cell phone reception or a place to stay and closer to hysteria than I'd like to admit. I pulled my rental car over at what looked like a police outpost and asked the first officer I saw if I could sleep in the parking lot. He gave me a long, molasses-slow look. "What have you eaten today?" he asked. Crackers and Tootsie Rolls, I answered. "Come with me," he said. We went to his patrol car, and he opened the trunk where his personal supply of Army-issue meals ready to eat was stored.
NEWS
By Robert Little | September 4, 2005
The residents of Gulfport, Miss., picked through the wreckage of their city in silence. They climbed over stacks of splintered lumber and shattered furniture, scraped soggy paper and housing insulation off their shoes, and wandered across a sunlit waterfront none of them recognized. The scene was as solemn as a funeral service until from a far corner of the city's shipping terminal, a cry for help rang out Tuesday. About a dozen people ran toward the wailing, seeking its source. Then they found it: an adult sea lion, escaped from the city's ruined aquarium, nestled against an overturned tractor near a bubbling sewer drain.
NEWS
By Christopher T. Assaf | September 4, 2005
A few memories from my childhood are now just that. But the house I remember is still there. It was my grandparents' house, on Camp Avenue, where my mother lived from age 14. Last week, it was flooded, but it still stood, withstanding the wind and waves just as it did when Hurricane Camille came through in 1969. Camp Avenue, its residents say, is the best street in Gulfport. Just ask Eo Gatewood, 89. He remembers my grandfather, James Oliver Bilbo, and the incredible clutter in and around his house - the musical instruments, the numerous Volkswagen Beetles.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2005
GULFPORT, Miss. - Breena Estorffe sat on her front porch near the beach, happy to escape the hot sun, and pondered which of her neighbors on 36th Avenue might be dead. The elderly woman down the block was seen stumbling around in the rubble that Hurricane Katrina left behind, and so were the people in the yellow house across the street. But other houses were reduced to splinters, and the pink apartment complex near the beach had vanished completely. The only movement there was of animals and rescue workers searching for survivors - or bodies.
NEWS
February 23, 2005
ALLEN "BIG AL" CONRAD, 53, of Long Beach, MS., died Friday, February 18, 2005 in Long Beach, MS. Big Al was born in Baltimore, Maryland and had been a resident of the coast for 30 years. He was retired from the US Navy and was a Vietnam Veteran. He was a member of the VNV/MC. He was preceded in death by his father, Ernest Conrad. He is survived by his Ol' Lady, Gayl "Angel" Tracy of Long Beach; his mother and stepfather, Frances and Joseph Houston of Joppa, Maryland; his son, Richard Le Normand of Gulfport; his daughter, Michelle Conrad of Gulfport; his brother, Michael Conrad of Baltimore, Maryland; and three grandchildren.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,sun reporter | August 27, 2006
GULFPORT, Miss. -- She lived in this house for 35 years before Hurricane Katrina banished Mary Spinks Thigpen to a government-issued trailer in the front yard and left the salvaged pieces of her old life - the wedding photos, the holiday cards, the church song books - crammed in plastic bins stacked along the porch, threatened again each time it rains. Across the street, Charles and Virginia James are living in the driveway of the home they moved to in 1969. Through the windows of their trailer, another on loan from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the couple watch the slow restoration of the house where they raised five children and used to linger on the back porch after she finished her morning route as a school bus driver.
NEWS
By Christopher T. Assaf | September 4, 2005
A few memories from my childhood are now just that. But the house I remember is still there. It was my grandparents' house, on Camp Avenue, where my mother lived from age 14. Last week, it was flooded, but it still stood, withstanding the wind and waves just as it did when Hurricane Camille came through in 1969. Camp Avenue, its residents say, is the best street in Gulfport. Just ask Eo Gatewood, 89. He remembers my grandfather, James Oliver Bilbo, and the incredible clutter in and around his house - the musical instruments, the numerous Volkswagen Beetles.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 9, 2000
GULFPORT, Miss. - Whether it's out of necessity or a desire for new wallpaper, women are heading to home improvement stores in growing numbers. "We probably get as many women as men customers," said Donna Guthrie, an employee of the Home Depot in Gulfport, Miss. "Basically, women are doing their own painting, tiling floors, doing minor plumbing repairs and hanging their own ceiling fans." A new survey by Home Depot and Yankelovich Partners found that more women (37 percent) would rather spend their weekend leisure time gardening or painting than shopping or strolling through a mall (28 percent)
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | August 14, 1991
BILOXI, Miss. -- Donald Leroy Evans has told investigators that he killed more than 60 people in a 10-year rampage in 17 states, his attorney says.Fred Lusk, Evans' court-appointed attorney, said yesterday the count could go higher, but investigators "have what we believe is all he can recall in detail at the present time."Evans, 34, of Galveston, Texas, has claimed that he killed victims in Florida, Texas, Alabama, Arizona, California, Washington, Idaho, Colorado, Wyoming, Michigan, South Dakota, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, North and South Carolina, Illinois and maybe Georgia.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.