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Gulf War Syndrome

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NEWS
By Michael Fumento | October 27, 1996
GULF WAR Gassed 15,000?" ran a banner headline atop the Rocky Mountain News in Denver. Ah, the old newspaper trick of using a question mark to get away with anything. How about: "Ross Perot: Space Alien?"Actually, that last one may be true. But we can say without a doubt that absolutely no allied troops were "gassed" in the gulf. Furthermore, reports that as many as 100,000 of our soldiers were "exposed" to Iraqi nerve gas are simply meaningless.Yet many consider this the smoking gun proving that the huge panoply of symptoms known as Gulf War Syndrome, of which I've counted over 80, is real.
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NEWS
By Faheem Younus | November 10, 2010
On this Veterans Day, I fondly think about my time serving as a physician-in-training at a New York Veterans Administration hospital. The year was 2000. The Gulf War was over. Our national debt was $5.7 trillion. Jobs were abundant. And "Gulf War Syndrome" was the biggest health concern for our veterans. The VA's motto always resonated with me: "To care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow, and his orphan. " And I tried my best to care for my patients with Gulf War Syndrome, despite the unexplainable complexity of their symptoms — ranging from depression and anxiety to irritable bowels and limb weakness.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A panel affiliated with the National Academy of Sciences said yesterday that the government's research on the health problems of Persian Gulf War veterans has been badly organized and has failed to determine whether the so-called Gulf War Syndrome really exists.The panel recommended that Vice President Al Gore's office coordinate a better-organized study of complaints by thousands of veterans that they contracted illnesses in the gulf.The report was released by a committee of the Institute of Medicine (IOM)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
Besides ranking as one of nature's cruelest afflictions, Lou Gehrig's disease is also one of the most mysterious. Pesticides, nerve gas, electric shocks, head trauma, even the ingestion of exotic nuts have been investigated as possible causes. Still, nobody knows the answer. And so, a preliminary government report this week that veterans of the Persian Gulf war are twice as likely as other soldiers to develop the fatal affliction has more than validated ailing veterans who have been arguing the case for years.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A medical panel reported to the Pentagon yesterday that it could find no single explanation for Persian Gulf war syndrome, the mystery illness that has struck thousands of veterans from the 1991 conflict with Iraq."
NEWS
October 10, 1996
THE NUMBER OF people willing to accept as truth a disputed allegation that the CIA helped sponsor the drug dealers who introduced crack cocaine into America's ghettoes shouldn't be surprising. The CIA has been caught so many times either covering up or skirting the truth that many citizens are convinced government agencies are capable of anything.This environment of mistrust is reinforced by the Defense Department's acknowledged mishandling of a years-long investigation of what caused thousands of GIs to come home from the Persian Gulf war with ailments ranging from hair loss to abdominal pains.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A panel affiliated with the National Academy of Sciences said yesterday that the government's research on the health problems of Persian Gulf war veterans has been badly organized and has failed to determine whether the so-called gulf war syndrome really exists.The panel recommended that Vice President Al Gore's office coordinate a better-organized study of complaints by thousands of veterans that they contracted illnesses in the gulf.The report was released by a committee of the Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 9, 1997
IRVINE, Calif. -- A number of medical professionals, who say they have become ill while treating Persian Gulf war veterans, claim the mysterious disease afflicting tens of thousands of soldiers is contagious and could pose a public health threat.Doctors, nurses and laboratory researchers, as well as others who come in casual contact with gulf war veterans, say they have contracted the same symptoms -- fatigue, fever, aches, rashes and respiratory problems -- that are generally associated with "gulf war syndrome."
NEWS
By A.J. BACEVICH | February 22, 1998
Disagreement is a rare achievement," John Courtney Murray observed. "Most of what we call disagreement is simply confusion."As the United States girds itself yet again to punish Iraq, political talk shows, op-ed pages and - as evidenced by Wednesday's raucous town hall meeting in Columbus, Ohio - even the American heartland resounds with controversy over the threatened attack. But this "disagreement," however clamorous, provides evidence not of genuine debate but of growing confusion over the proper role of force in international affairs.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A scientific survey underwritten by the Pentagon has concluded that an experimental drug given to American troops during the Persian Gulf war to protect against a nerve gas may have been responsible for the chronic illnesses afflicting tens of thousands of veterans.The report, to be released at a news conference today, is the first commissioned by the Pentagon to identify a possible cause for the illnesses, which have collectively come to be known as gulf war syndrome. It sharply contradicts two earlier government studies -- by a presidential commission and by the Institute of Medicine -- that ruled out the drug as a cause.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A scientific survey underwritten by the Pentagon has concluded that an experimental drug given to American troops during the Persian Gulf war to protect against a nerve gas may have been responsible for the chronic illnesses afflicting tens of thousands of veterans.The report, to be released at a news conference today, is the first commissioned by the Pentagon to identify a possible cause for the illnesses, which have collectively come to be known as gulf war syndrome. It sharply contradicts two earlier government studies -- by a presidential commission and by the Institute of Medicine -- that ruled out the drug as a cause.
NEWS
By A.J. BACEVICH | February 22, 1998
Disagreement is a rare achievement," John Courtney Murray observed. "Most of what we call disagreement is simply confusion."As the United States girds itself yet again to punish Iraq, political talk shows, op-ed pages and - as evidenced by Wednesday's raucous town hall meeting in Columbus, Ohio - even the American heartland resounds with controversy over the threatened attack. But this "disagreement," however clamorous, provides evidence not of genuine debate but of growing confusion over the proper role of force in international affairs.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
WASHINGTON - Elaine Showalter is pursued by tired people.She began to suspect she had a serious problem after an appearance on a Washington television station. A doctor she had debated on an interview show caught her on the way out, told her she hoped her life would be ruined, her career wrecked, then added: "We're going to rip you to shreds."The physician had come on the show to argue the medical validity of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome -- which is to say, that it has a biological cause. One of the points of Showalter's new book, "Hystories," is that it doesn't, that it is a form of hysteria.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 9, 1997
IRVINE, Calif. -- A number of medical professionals, who say they have become ill while treating Persian Gulf war veterans, claim the mysterious disease afflicting tens of thousands of soldiers is contagious and could pose a public health threat.Doctors, nurses and laboratory researchers, as well as others who come in casual contact with gulf war veterans, say they have contracted the same symptoms -- fatigue, fever, aches, rashes and respiratory problems -- that are generally associated with "gulf war syndrome."
NEWS
By Michael Fumento | October 27, 1996
GULF WAR Gassed 15,000?" ran a banner headline atop the Rocky Mountain News in Denver. Ah, the old newspaper trick of using a question mark to get away with anything. How about: "Ross Perot: Space Alien?"Actually, that last one may be true. But we can say without a doubt that absolutely no allied troops were "gassed" in the gulf. Furthermore, reports that as many as 100,000 of our soldiers were "exposed" to Iraqi nerve gas are simply meaningless.Yet many consider this the smoking gun proving that the huge panoply of symptoms known as Gulf War Syndrome, of which I've counted over 80, is real.
NEWS
October 10, 1996
THE NUMBER OF people willing to accept as truth a disputed allegation that the CIA helped sponsor the drug dealers who introduced crack cocaine into America's ghettoes shouldn't be surprising. The CIA has been caught so many times either covering up or skirting the truth that many citizens are convinced government agencies are capable of anything.This environment of mistrust is reinforced by the Defense Department's acknowledged mishandling of a years-long investigation of what caused thousands of GIs to come home from the Persian Gulf war with ailments ranging from hair loss to abdominal pains.
NEWS
By Faheem Younus | November 10, 2010
On this Veterans Day, I fondly think about my time serving as a physician-in-training at a New York Veterans Administration hospital. The year was 2000. The Gulf War was over. Our national debt was $5.7 trillion. Jobs were abundant. And "Gulf War Syndrome" was the biggest health concern for our veterans. The VA's motto always resonated with me: "To care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow, and his orphan. " And I tried my best to care for my patients with Gulf War Syndrome, despite the unexplainable complexity of their symptoms — ranging from depression and anxiety to irritable bowels and limb weakness.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
Besides ranking as one of nature's cruelest afflictions, Lou Gehrig's disease is also one of the most mysterious. Pesticides, nerve gas, electric shocks, head trauma, even the ingestion of exotic nuts have been investigated as possible causes. Still, nobody knows the answer. And so, a preliminary government report this week that veterans of the Persian Gulf war are twice as likely as other soldiers to develop the fatal affliction has more than validated ailing veterans who have been arguing the case for years.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A panel affiliated with the National Academy of Sciences said yesterday that the government's research on the health problems of Persian Gulf war veterans has been badly organized and has failed to determine whether the so-called gulf war syndrome really exists.The panel recommended that Vice President Al Gore's office coordinate a better-organized study of complaints by thousands of veterans that they contracted illnesses in the gulf.The report was released by a committee of the Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A panel affiliated with the National Academy of Sciences said yesterday that the government's research on the health problems of Persian Gulf War veterans has been badly organized and has failed to determine whether the so-called Gulf War Syndrome really exists.The panel recommended that Vice President Al Gore's office coordinate a better-organized study of complaints by thousands of veterans that they contracted illnesses in the gulf.The report was released by a committee of the Institute of Medicine (IOM)
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