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By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
Gulf oil coated state politics last week as Democrats in Maryland's two highest-profile contests tried to tar their likely Republican opponents with the BP spill. Maryland Republicans responded with indignation: Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. accused Gov. Martin O'Malley of "seeking to take advantage of the tragedy." The Maryland Republican Party, sticking up for congressional hopeful Andy Harris, scolded Rep. Frank Kratovil for trying to "capitalize" on the "worst environmental disaster in US history."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2011
Ralph H. Hemphill Jr., a former Crown Central Petroleum Corp. executive who later worked for the state Department of Agriculture, died Oct. 7 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at a San Diego assisted-living facility. The longtime Towson resident was 89. The son of a contractor and a homemaker, Ralph Hayes Hemphill Jr. was born in Philadelphia and raised in Upper Darby, Pa. After graduating from Upper Darby High School, Mr. Hemphill worked before World War II at the old Baldwin Locomotive Works in Eddystone, Pa., and the Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. in Chester, Pa. With the outbreak of World War II, he enlisted in the Navy, where he was trained as a carrier pilot and flew Douglas Dauntless dive bombers and F4U Corsair fighter planes.
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NEWS
August 11, 2005
Irene May Keesler, a retired Johns Hopkins University executive assistant, died of heart failure Aug. 4 at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 78. Born Irene Zoeller in Dumont, N.J., she attended the Scudder secretarial school in New York City and worked there for Gulf Oil Corp. She met and married Carl Von Elm, a Gulf Oil drilling engineer. They later divorced. In 1962, she married Don Keesler, a salesman for the old Manhattan Shirt Co., and moved to Baltimore, where she became executive assistant to George Owen, Hopkins' dean of arts and sciences at the Homewood campus.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
The oil rig blowout in the Gulf of Mexico may have pinched the supply of big Louisiana blue crabs that some Maryland restaurants rely upon, but there's apparently been no shortage of crustaceans to steam, crack and pick this summer, as the Chesapeake Bay has produced its best harvest in years. "We didn't need Louisiana crabs this year," said Larry W. Simns, president of the Maryland Watermen's Association. "We've got so many crabs now we can't sell them. " That's in part because "demand has been iffy" at times, said Jack Brooks, co-owner of the J.M. Clayton Co., a long-time seafood business in Cambridge that packs and ships 30,000 pounds of crabs and crabmeat daily from spring into fall.
NEWS
October 19, 2008
GEORGE KELLER, 84 Former Chevron chairman George Keller, who oversaw the formation of Chevron Corp. in what was then the largest corporate takeover, died Friday in Palo Alto, Calif. The former chairman and chief executive died of complications from orthopedic surgery. As chairman of the Standard Oil Co. of California, Mr. Keller executed the company's $13.3 billion takeover of Gulf Oil to form Chevron in 1984. The deal was considered risky at the time.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2011
Ralph H. Hemphill Jr., a former Crown Central Petroleum Corp. executive who later worked for the state Department of Agriculture, died Oct. 7 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at a San Diego assisted-living facility. The longtime Towson resident was 89. The son of a contractor and a homemaker, Ralph Hayes Hemphill Jr. was born in Philadelphia and raised in Upper Darby, Pa. After graduating from Upper Darby High School, Mr. Hemphill worked before World War II at the old Baldwin Locomotive Works in Eddystone, Pa., and the Sun Shipbuilding & Drydock Co. in Chester, Pa. With the outbreak of World War II, he enlisted in the Navy, where he was trained as a carrier pilot and flew Douglas Dauntless dive bombers and F4U Corsair fighter planes.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Kathy Lally and Will Englund and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 24, 1998
MOSCOW -- For most of the 1990s, Russia felt itself to be the Willy Loman of nations -- "I used to be somebody" -- but yesterday it was back in the thick of things, a player. It felt good.Russian diplomats were going to unusual lengths to try to appear modest, but they took a large part of the credit nonetheless for the agreement between Saddam Hussein and the United Nations that appears to have averted the threat of U.S. military strikes against Iraq.With a bow to Kofi Annan, the United Nations secretary-general, the Russian Foreign Ministry declared yesterday that the "decisive factor in ensuring the success" of his mission was the diplomatic contact between President Boris N. Yeltsin and Hussein"It's a success for Russian policy, and a personal success for Yevgeny M. Primakov," said Alexei Malashenko, a program associate with the Carnegie Moscow Center, referring to the Russian foreign minister.
NEWS
November 27, 1990
A 'holy war' can't be won with tanksWith the Cold War ended and the Soviet threat gone, our people and our Congress have been pressing for a "peace dividend," a reduction in our military budget by as much as 50 percent.And now comes the takeover, with President Bush declaring that not only must we defend Saudi Arabia from an invasion but we must free Kuwait and stop Saddam Hussein and other future Hitlers. How can we think of cutting defense? It worked: There is no peace dividend; we saved just $3 billion from a $278 billion defense budget.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 5, 1990
Letters, calls and the roar of the crowd:*R. Austin Tydings, Baltimore: I was the city treasurer foBaltimore City when Victor Frenkil asked for the loan for the Belvedere Hotel. And I wouldn't give it to him! That's when he turned to Mayor Schaefer and the trustees.I read in the paper recently how Frenkil claimed to have lost millions of his own money on the Belvedere and I had to laugh. Do I believe him? Well, let's just say I am not sorry I turned him down. Hell, no.COMMENT: Public servants who say hell no to politically connected businessmen are extremely rare.
NEWS
By Paul West and Charles W. Corddry and Paul West and Charles W. Corddry,Washington Bureau of The Sun Karen Hosler and Peter Honey of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | January 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Triggering perhaps the largest oil spill in history, Iraq has deliberately released a possible 200 million gallons or more of crude into the Persian Gulf in an apparent effort to foil an allied amphibious invasion, officials said yesterday.The floating mass of thick, unrefined oil is pouring from a Kuwaiti offshore oil terminal and five Iraqi tankers in a nearby port. The slick was spreading south and had fouled the Saudi coastline at least 50 miles away, according to the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
John Joseph Shaffrey, a retired Gulf Oil Corp. senior lubrication engineer and a volunteer, died July 21 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 87. Mr. Shaffrey, the son of a paper mill manager and a homemaker, was born in Ogdensburg, N.Y., and raised in Cornerbrook, Newfoundland, where his family had moved in 1929 to find work. He was a 1938 graduate of St. Henry's High School. His college studies at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, were interrupted when he enlisted in 1939 in the Canadian navy.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2010
Scientists from the National Aquarium and the Johns Hopkins University are gearing up to study the ecosystem of Sarasota Bay before crude oil from the BP Deepwater blowout reaches southwest Florida waters. Working in cooperation with the Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, the Maryland researchers will collect samples of sediments, water and marine organisms as a baseline for comparison later, if the oil reaches the area. "We want to make sure we have that 'pre' information, otherwise it will be almost impossible to obtain meaningful values for the damage that will have occurred to the natural resources," said Erik Rifkin, interim executive director of the National Aquarium Conservation Center.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
When President Bush pushed the Class Action Fairness Act (CAFA) through Congress in 2005, environmentalists lamented the demise of the one of the last robust incentives for energy companies to develop meaningful safeguards against environmental disasters. At the time the bill was passed, one headline presciently read, "Erin Brockovich, drop dead." BP executives should be relieved to find that her legacy is still buried six feet deep in oil sludge. In recent weeks, Congress and the president have been roundly criticized for their slow response to the Deepwater Horizon rig explosion in the Gulf that triggered one of the worst environmental disasters in U.S. history.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
The Deepwater Horizon disaster has probably damaged the Gulf of Mexico beyond recovery in our lifetimes. However, one great blessing remains. Now is the time to act so that it, too, isn't lost forever. Our Chesapeake Bay, spoken of by H.L. Mencken as the "great protein factory," has, despite our best efforts, been sick for decades. But we still have the power to bring it back to health. The obstacles are political rather than technological. This year's election provides an ideal context within which to spread this message.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2010
Gulf oil coated state politics last week as Democrats in Maryland's two highest-profile contests tried to tar their likely Republican opponents with the BP spill. Maryland Republicans responded with indignation: Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. accused Gov. Martin O'Malley of "seeking to take advantage of the tragedy." The Maryland Republican Party, sticking up for congressional hopeful Andy Harris, scolded Rep. Frank Kratovil for trying to "capitalize" on the "worst environmental disaster in US history."
NEWS
By Rena Steinzor | June 17, 2010
President Barack Obama's speech Tuesday night was an indication that BP and its corporate partners are starting to be called to account for the damage done by the massive oil spill devastating the Gulf of Mexico and the region. But an equally important set of questions needs to be answered about how the federal regulatory system allowed BP and other oil companies to drill in waters so deep without effective fail-safes. In truth, this is just the last in a string of profit-driven tragedies that have horrified us recently.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
The oil that began washing ashore Friday in Louisiana could devastate one of the richest coastal ecosystems in the country and cripple a major source of the nation's seafood, a top Maryland scientist warns. But Donald F. Boesch, president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, said a rush to clean up oil smothering sensitive wetlands could risk further damage if not done right. Fish and shellfish, shorebirds and waterfowl, sea turtles and a host of other wildlife are at risk from the more than 200,000 gallons of oil pumping daily out of the ruptured well in the Gulf of Mexico 50 miles off the Louisiana coast.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2010
Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin said after touring the oil-smeared Louisiana coast Friday that federal officials appear to be making progress in curtailing the huge leak from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico. But the Maryland Democrat urged Obama administration officials to challenge BP more, and he vowed to push legislation in the Senate to hold the energy company liable for all damages caused to coastal communities as well as the cleanup costs "It is just beyond description," Cardin said by telephone of the devastation he and other senators saw in a helicopter flyover as well as a boat tour of the waters near Queen Bess Island and Grand Isle.
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