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By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 1996
ABOARD THE ACADIANA -- The instant the captain cuts the engines, the crew of the research vessel Acadiana shifts into swift, synchronized action: scooping water samples from the ocean surface and the seabed; lowering an array of instruments overboard to gather data from the depths; whirling and zapping the water in the on-board laboratory until it yields its secrets.Then, almost before the winch can hoist the last instrument back on deck, the engines roar to life, and the ship heads for the next sampling station - an invisible point along an imaginary line flung out into the Gulf of Mexico.
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SPORTS
By From Sun news services | March 20, 2009
A Miami television station and newspaper reported that blood tests show Cleveland Browns wide receiver Donte' Stallworth was driving drunk when he fatally struck a pedestrian last weekend. WSVN-TV reported yesterday that unnamed sources with knowledge of the investigation said Stallworth's blood-alcohol level was between .08 and .16. The legal limit is .08. The Miami Herald also reported that an unnamed source said Stallworth's blood-alcohol level was above the legal limit. The Miami Beach Police Department wouldn't confirm the reports to the Associated Press.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 16, 1998
NEW YORK -- Kerr-McGee Corp. said yesterday that it agreed to buy Oryx Energy Co., an oil exploration company, for $3.14 billion in stock and assumed debt, expanding its reserves in the rich fields of the Gulf of Mexico and North Sea.The buyout values Oryx at $15.77 a share based on yesterday's closing stock prices, or $1.68 billion, and represents a 37 percent premium for Oryx shareholders over Wednesday's closing price of $11.50. Kerr-McGee, an oil and chemicals company, will assume $1.3 billion in debt.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | February 15, 2009
There are a few of us here in the newsroom who are still praying for a really big snowstorm - call us nutty, if you want - before the winter of 2009 recedes into memory. So, it's not uncommon for us to beat a path to our in-house weather oracle, Frank Roylance, who keeps his eyes on the skies and for developing lows over the Gulf of Mexico. Those southern-bred storms give us snow-lovers hope and have the potential of being big snow-makers as they roll up the Eastern Seaboard, sucking up all that wonderful Atlantic Ocean moisture that translates into snow, snow, snow and more snow!
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1997
LAFITTE, La. - Albert "Jacko" Darda, a prominent shrimper from the bayou country below New Orleans, explains what it means to trawl a net along the Gulf of Mexico's bottom and make a "Forrest Gump" drag."
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 1997
I will be going to Sarasota, Fla., for a few days in late December and want to catch a marlin. Where can I charter a boat? How much would it cost?You're fishing off the wrong pier. Charter-boat operators we contacted said that while a marlin might be found in the deeper parts of the Gulf of Mexico, the fish is more like the baseball team that has adopted its name: It lives closer to Miami, in the Atlantic.But that doesn't mean there aren't some challenging angling opportunities off Sarasota.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 17, 2004
GULF SHORES, Ala. - Sgt. Skip Callaway knew the streets would look like a green snowfall, and that roofs would come off and trees would blow down. He was even prepared to find death the morning after Hurricane Ivan hit his beachfront town. But standing as he was yesterday, at the intersection of Route 59 and Zoo Drive, Callaway still found it hard to contemplate just how much change a storm like Ivan brings. To his right was a crumpled restaurant, one of hundreds of damaged businesses in town.
NEWS
May 23, 2006
One hurricane hitting where you live is enough to make it a bad season." MAX MAYFIELD, director of the National Hurricane Center, on the severity of this year's hurricane season; the center predicts four to six major hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 25, 1996
The most powerful man in Russia today is Yeltsin's surgeon. Maryland's choice is simple: We get either our crabs from the Gulf of Mexico, or our crab pickers.Bill told the U.N. what he thinks of it, and when this election is over will go back and tell it what he really thinks.Archaeologists in Australia have discovered that the first painters 75,000 years ago were abstract expressionists.Pub Date: 9/25/96
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1998
Three of some of the world's rarest animals -- a trio of battered Kemp's ridley sea turtles that breed on beaches in the Gulf of Mexico -- arrived in critical condition at the National Aquarium in Baltimore last night to be nursed back to health.The turtles, which had beached themselves on Cape Cod after traveling into the frigid waters of the Northeast, were found in a comalike condition because of the weather. A dozen of the turtles were recovered by the New England Aquarium and three of them were transferred to Baltimore, arriving about 5 p.m. yesterday.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | July 16, 2008
Increasing corn production is expected to spawn an oxygen-starved "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico larger than anything seen in 23 years of recordkeeping - an 8,800-square-mile area, roughly the size of New Jersey - researchers said yesterday. "It's had a disastrous effect on the fisheries for sure," said R. Eugene Turner, a research scientist with Louisiana State University. An increase in corn production to manufacture ethanol-based fuels has jacked up the nutrients flowing down the Mississippi River to the gulf, where they deplete oxygen in the water, Turner said.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Richard Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 1, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration moved yesterday to open an area off the Virginia coast to oil and gas drilling, a step that environmentalists warned could lead to the weakening of the long-standing ban on new energy exploration off much of the U.S. coast. That ban was inspired by a devastating oil spill off Santa Barbara, Calif., in 1969. But with high gasoline prices and concern about U.S. dependence on foreign oil, pro-drilling forces are more hopeful of persuading Congress -- even with its Democratic majority -- to relax the drilling ban. Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne unveiled yesterday a five-year plan that calls for offering drilling leases in an area off Virginia that has been off limits since the 1980s, a move that is subject to presidential and congressional approval.
NEWS
By Richard Simon and Jim Puzzanghera and Richard Simon and Jim Puzzanghera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As the curtain prepared to fall on the Republican-controlled Congress, GOP leaders pushed for approval of what is likely to be the last major pro-drilling bill during the Bush presidency - a measure that would open a large swath of the Gulf of Mexico to energy exploration. The drilling provision was part of a $45 billion tax and trade bill that was pending before the House. If that chamber passed it before the night ended, it would likely go to the Senate today as the lame-duck Congress wrapped up its business.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Douglass and Elizabeth Douglass,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 6, 2006
Chevron Corp. and two partners said yesterday that they had tapped a potentially huge source of oil in the Gulf of Mexico's deep waters, raising hopes that further discoveries in the region could help ease the nation's oil supply woes. The successful test of the deepest well ever drilled in U.S. territory showed such promise that some think the undersea oil pool could be the largest domestic discovery of crude since Alaska's Prudhoe Bay field began flowing nearly 40 years ago. "An opportunity like this only comes once every few decades," said Daniel Yergin, chairman of Boston-based Cambridge Energy Research Associates.
NEWS
August 9, 2006
The Sun brings you a weekly report of key votes in the Congress.Here's how Maryland senators voted on major roll call votes last week.The House was in recess. The full Congress is in recess until Sept. 5. Issues before the Senate last week Gulf of Mexico Drilling: Senators passed, 71-25, a bill to open about 8.34 million acres in the eastern Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas extraction while setting a 125-mile buffer zone between Florida and the drilling area. A yes vote was to send the bill to a House-Senate conference.
NEWS
By RICHARD SIMON AND MAURA REYNOLDS | August 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- With political anxiety on Capitol Hill rising along with gasoline prices, the Senate voted yesterday to open a large section of the Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas drilling. The bill, approved 71-25, must be reconciled with a broader House measure that would relax the decades-long ban on drilling in most coastal waters, including along the Pacific coast. Senators from both parties, attuned to constituents' ire over high fuel costs, were eager to pass energy legislation before heading home for the summer recess.
NEWS
August 9, 2006
The Sun brings you a weekly report of key votes in the Congress.Here's how Maryland senators voted on major roll call votes last week.The House was in recess. The full Congress is in recess until Sept. 5. Issues before the Senate last week Gulf of Mexico Drilling: Senators passed, 71-25, a bill to open about 8.34 million acres in the eastern Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas extraction while setting a 125-mile buffer zone between Florida and the drilling area. A yes vote was to send the bill to a House-Senate conference.
NEWS
By RICHARD SIMON AND MAURA REYNOLDS | August 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- With political anxiety on Capitol Hill rising along with gasoline prices, the Senate voted yesterday to open a large section of the Gulf of Mexico to oil and gas drilling. The bill, approved 71-25, must be reconciled with a broader House measure that would relax the decades-long ban on drilling in most coastal waters, including along the Pacific coast. Senators from both parties, attuned to constituents' ire over high fuel costs, were eager to pass energy legislation before heading home for the summer recess.
NEWS
By MARNI GOLDBERG and MARNI GOLDBERG,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 1, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Senate moved closer yesterday to approving legislation that would make 8.3 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico available for oil and natural gas drilling and end a quarter-century ban against tapping the rich energy resources in coastal waters. Facing increasing prices for crude oil and natural gas, which have left Americans paying more for gasoline and for heating and cooling their homes, the bill's proponents say this represents an opportunity for America to increase domestic supplies of energy.
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