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NEWS
September 4, 2006
There is a small but memorable scene in Russian novelist and dissident Alexander Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago in which he sits upon the banks of the Belomor Canal, observing two nearly identical barges equally loaded with pine logs moving past each other in opposite directions. "And canceling the one load against the other," the author wrote, "we get zero." In seemingly endless lines moving in opposite directions, Maryland drivers spend more time behind the wheel going to and from work and school than ever.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Since the earliest days of our foundation, our forefathers and their forefathers have celebrated something resembling National Duck Out of Work for a Drink Day. It's always day of camarederie, merriment, and spending 15 minutes away from what, even Benjamin Franklin, called that cramped gulag that passes for a cubicle. Since last year, when The Awl's Alex Balk, declared it so, August 25 has held the official honor. So, cubicle dwellers of Baltimore, where are you going to go tomorrow when you duck out of work for a drink?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Sun Staff | April 20, 2003
Gulag: A History, by Anne Applebaum. Doubleday. 592 pages. $35. Once the Russian czar owned everything in the empire, even the people, who could, at his pleasure, be sent off to exile in Siberia or pressed into forced labor to build the city of St. Petersburg. The Soviets replaced the czar with the state, which owned everything, even the people. Stalin, in manic pursuit of ostensible progress and industrialization, offered up millions of his citizens to that end. His slave labor system was regulated by the GULAG, an acronym that stands for Main Camp Administration, which oversaw the imprisonment of millions of people, for crimes mostly imagined.
NEWS
December 16, 2009
President Barack Obama partially fulfilled a campaign promise Tuesday when he announced plans to transfer up to 100 terror suspects currently held at the military detention facility at Guantanamo Bay to a federal maximum-security prison in Illinois. Moving the inmates to the American mainland brings his administration a step closer to begin putting them on trial in civilian courts here and shutting down the Guantanamo facility, which Mr. Obama said has become a global symbol and recruiting tool for al-Qaeda.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | August 9, 2008
For reasons I can't precisely remember, I began reading Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn's monumentalaccount of the Soviet penal labor camps, The Gulag Archipelago, in the late 1980s. I was working for a company that published long histories of wars and other pivotal events; my job was to churn out, in a breezy but authoritative style, captions for the book's photographs. Perhaps I thought that reading Mr. Solzhenitsyn, whose novels mingled lyrical descriptions of the suffering human soul with a profound sense of moral outrage, would help me find my own voice as a writer.
NEWS
By Bert Breuer | January 29, 1991
I'M AN escapee from a nursing home.After more than a decade of bouncing from one of these old-age prisons to the next, I finally decided I'd had enough. I figured I'd paid my nursing home dues as a wheelchair-confined paraplegic in his late 60s. I wanted a better life for myself.Quite frankly, I'd seen all I wanted of the "senior citizens' gulag." After living in half-a-dozen of these warehouses for the elderly, I had gradually realized that all of them were the same: They were run for the convenience of the staff.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 9, 2003
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - Tamara Petkevich and the others in her troupe were like actors anywhere, using every trick they knew to make an audience laugh, shudder or cry. There was, however, one crucial difference. Petkevich and her colleagues were all prisoners of the gulag, the vast Soviet-era system of prison camps. The actors knew that their lives might depend on how well they played their roles. And they realized that by evoking long-forgotten emotions, they could encourage their audiences to go on living, too. "The fact is that camp art was completely different from art on the outside, because the ultimate purpose of an artist in the camp was to survive, by all means necessary," says Petkevich, who, at 82, retains the elegance and authority that made her a star of the gulag's stages.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 1999
RUDNIK MATROSOVA, Russia -- Throughout a factory filled with the din of machines grinding rocks, female guards tote rifles and shotguns, like a small militia of Annie Oakleys.Surveying the vast room, one might conclude that this factory, which lies in the subarctic taiga 250 miles north of the Pacific port city of Magadan, exists only to create mud. Tons of rocks are pulverized every day and flushed through a series of ridged basins, where the heavier sediment sinks.But in that sediment swirl glints of something more valuable: gold.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | June 19, 2006
MOSCOW -- A new album here paints a scene on its cover reminiscent of a 1960s Beach Boys' record: a brilliant red-and-gold sunset behind a man wearing a lei. But the sun is setting over a prison wall, the man is Josef Stalin and the lei is made of skulls. Gulag Tunes, the brainchild of a part-time musician who works at a hospital morgue in Moscow, does what perhaps no other album has done before: mixes the melodies of traditional Russian prison songs with the distinctive sound of the "surf" genre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Since the earliest days of our foundation, our forefathers and their forefathers have celebrated something resembling National Duck Out of Work for a Drink Day. It's always day of camarederie, merriment, and spending 15 minutes away from what, even Benjamin Franklin, called that cramped gulag that passes for a cubicle. Since last year, when The Awl's Alex Balk, declared it so, August 25 has held the official honor. So, cubicle dwellers of Baltimore, where are you going to go tomorrow when you duck out of work for a drink?
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | August 9, 2008
For reasons I can't precisely remember, I began reading Alexander I. Solzhenitsyn's monumentalaccount of the Soviet penal labor camps, The Gulag Archipelago, in the late 1980s. I was working for a company that published long histories of wars and other pivotal events; my job was to churn out, in a breezy but authoritative style, captions for the book's photographs. Perhaps I thought that reading Mr. Solzhenitsyn, whose novels mingled lyrical descriptions of the suffering human soul with a profound sense of moral outrage, would help me find my own voice as a writer.
NEWS
July 27, 2007
Here is Alexander Solzhenitsyn, the author of The Gulag Archipelago, the man who more than any other made the world understand the cruelty and senselessness of the Soviet prison camp system and, by extension, of the Soviet Union itself. Here is Mr. Solzhenitsyn, a former prisoner of the gulag, an exile in Vermont for many years, more recently a refusenik by choice when offered prizes by Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Boris N. Yeltsin - here he is accepting an award in June from President Vladimir V. Putin, whose career began in the organization that imprisoned the truth-seeking writer.
NEWS
September 4, 2006
There is a small but memorable scene in Russian novelist and dissident Alexander Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago in which he sits upon the banks of the Belomor Canal, observing two nearly identical barges equally loaded with pine logs moving past each other in opposite directions. "And canceling the one load against the other," the author wrote, "we get zero." In seemingly endless lines moving in opposite directions, Maryland drivers spend more time behind the wheel going to and from work and school than ever.
NEWS
By ERIKA NIEDOWSKI and ERIKA NIEDOWSKI,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | June 19, 2006
MOSCOW -- A new album here paints a scene on its cover reminiscent of a 1960s Beach Boys' record: a brilliant red-and-gold sunset behind a man wearing a lei. But the sun is setting over a prison wall, the man is Josef Stalin and the lei is made of skulls. Gulag Tunes, the brainchild of a part-time musician who works at a hospital morgue in Moscow, does what perhaps no other album has done before: mixes the melodies of traditional Russian prison songs with the distinctive sound of the "surf" genre.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | October 13, 2005
I THINK WE CAN ALL AGREE that this is a tough time to be a sports fan in this town, and that thumbing through the sports section is like driving a nail into your forehead on most days. Let's look at recent events around here, shall we? The Ravens are 1-3 and coming off a startling breakdown in civilized behavior that looks like something out of Lord of the Flies. The Orioles just finished their eighth straight losing season and are now officially so dysfunctional the state should step in and take the players away from Peter Angelos and put them in a good orphanage, where they can start putting some of the horrible memories behind them and begin to thrive as baseball players again.
NEWS
By Stephen J. Hedges and Stephen J. Hedges,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 15, 2005
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld offered a lengthy rebuttal yesterday to recent calls to close the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, arguing that intelligence gleaned from suspected terrorists held there has stopped attacks and led to arrests. "The real problem is not Guantanamo Bay," Rumsfeld said. "The problem is that, to a large extent, we are in unexplored territory with this unconventional and complex struggle against extremism. Traditional doctrines covering criminals and military prisoners do not apply well enough."
NEWS
July 27, 2007
Here is Alexander Solzhenitsyn, the author of The Gulag Archipelago, the man who more than any other made the world understand the cruelty and senselessness of the Soviet prison camp system and, by extension, of the Soviet Union itself. Here is Mr. Solzhenitsyn, a former prisoner of the gulag, an exile in Vermont for many years, more recently a refusenik by choice when offered prizes by Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Boris N. Yeltsin - here he is accepting an award in June from President Vladimir V. Putin, whose career began in the organization that imprisoned the truth-seeking writer.
NEWS
By A. M. Rosenthal | March 9, 1994
Jerusalem -- IN A Jerusalem apartment earlier this winter, two men sat watching their children light Hanukkah candles. Then they talked of another winter night when they themselves had lighted Hanukkah candles.They remembered how hard it had been to keep the flame burning in Chistopol prison, in one of the cold cells set aside for men like them who had challenged the Soviet Union with their minds.The candles were small pieces of wax paper that they had squirreled away for months. The hope of the two cellmates was that the paper would burn long enough for them to say their prayers.
NEWS
By John Riley and John Riley,NEWSDAY | May 26, 2005
Amnesty International called the U.S. military's prison at Guantanamo Bay the "gulag of our times" yesterday and warned that American leaders might face international prosecution for mistreating prisoners. "When the most powerful country in the world thumbs its nose at the rule of law and human rights, it grants a license to others to commit abuse with impunity and audacity," Amnesty Secretary-General Irene Khan said at a London news conference releasing the group's annual report on global human rights, a blistering, 308-page survey.
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