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NEWS
October 29, 2003
Charles Thomas Hird, a retired ironworker and guitar player, died of heart and kidney failure Saturday at Howard County General Hospital. The longtime Randallstown resident was 82. Mr. Hird was born in Cheyenne Wells, Colo., and raised in Kearney, Neb. He was a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps at the time of his 1942 enlistment in the Army Air Forces. He served as a B-17 crew chief stateside and attained the rank of staff sergeant. He worked as an ironworker in upstate New York before moving to Baltimore in the early 1950s.
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NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2004
MUSICIANS WITH fiddles, guitars and a banjo ukulele belt out toe-tapping, old-time mountain music in Thunder Hill most Saturday evenings as part of Howard County Appalachian and Old Time Music. The group, run by Thunder Hill residents Howard Zane and his wife, Sandy Hofferth, jams in the couple's home or on their back deck, as visitors and the couple's 11 cats and 13-year-old dog listen. "The music really pulls you back into history," said Lisa Roberts, a fiddler and banjo player from Baltimore who has attended the sessions for 20 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 7, 1995
Given Tad Doyle's not inconsiderable bulk, it's hard to suppress visions of diet cola and Stairmasters when he says that Tad has "slimmed down."What he means, though, is that his band -- that Tad -- is smaller than it used to be. "We lost a member and became more focused and undiluted," he says, over the phone from a diner in Ft. Wayne, N.J. "I have what [Dinosaur Jr. guitarist] J. Mascis calls the biological advantage. I was playing left- and right-stereo guitar; I was playing both by myself, rather than with another guitar player."
NEWS
October 29, 2003
Charles Thomas Hird, a retired ironworker and guitar player, died of heart and kidney failure Saturday at Howard County General Hospital. The longtime Randallstown resident was 82. Mr. Hird was born in Cheyenne Wells, Colo., and raised in Kearney, Neb. He was a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps at the time of his 1942 enlistment in the Army Air Forces. He served as a B-17 crew chief stateside and attained the rank of staff sergeant. He worked as an ironworker in upstate New York before moving to Baltimore in the early 1950s.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2002
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre has extended its season through Sunday, ending the way it began in May, by rocking the dock with high-voltage talent. "Rock Around the Dock - Take II" is a bolder, brassier show with a dazzling set constructed of yards-high wedges of vibrant color that makes a great backdrop for a dynamic ensemble of singers and dancers. Directors Jeff Hitaffer and Kevin Wheatley, who conceived the idea of opening the company's current season with a rock show, are back directing this latest incarnation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considin and J. D. Considin,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 8, 1994
When John Michael Montgomery was a kid, he never figured he'd end up as a big-time country music singer. In fact, he never thought he'd be a singer at all."I was a guitar player," he says. "When I got in a band, my objective was to be a good guitar player. I actually focused on that before I even focused on being a lead singer -- or being asinger, period."I'm probably more accomplished on guitar," he adds, over the phone from a tour stop in Champaign, Ill. "I used to spend three to five hours a day, every day, just playing guitar and learning.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 26, 1998
I GOT A CALL from a guy I know named Carl. It was a cry for help. Carl is a successful man in his 40s, but sometimes even successful people, when they are in need, have to reach out to their friends, and I am proud to consider Carl a friend, even though for my 50th birthday he gave me some kind of reptile egg, which thank God never hatched.It took some effort for Carl to overcome his masculine pride and tell me what was on his mind. It was something that I believe is on the mind of a lot of guys, although they cannot always admit it."
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | September 19, 1994
NEW YORK -- Vitas Gerulaitis, who rose from the public courts of Brooklyn and Queens to become the No. 3 men's tennis player in the world, was found dead yesterday at a friend's home in Southampton. He was 40.The Southampton village police said that Gerulaitis' body was found shortly after 3 p.m. A preliminary medical examination indicated that he suffered a heart attack while sleeping, said his sister, Ruta. An autopsy was scheduled for today by the Suffolk County Medical Examiner's office.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 5, 1992
Her first name means "fire," and anyone who has ever heard Chaka Khan lift her voice in song knows how apt that is. On stage, hers is an astonishing instrument, full of brilliant colors and vibrant intensity, taking command of the music with the sort of unquestioned authority few singers ever manage.Her flame isn't always on full, however. Speaking with her over the phone early one July afternoon, it seems at times as if she barely has the pilot light going, so soft is her whisper. Granted, some of that is the connection, which makes her Long Island hotel room seem farther away than it is, and some to the fact that she only just woke up.Mostly, though, it's simply a reflection of the fact that Chaka Khan was born to sing.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 2, 1995
Now that Natalie Merchant is touring in support of her first solo album, "Tigerlily," things feel a little different in performance.Granted, some of that is to be expected. After spending more than a dozen years as the singer for 10,000 Maniacs, seeing a different set of musicians onstage every night is obviously something of an adjustment. Not that Merchant objects to the change."I like looking around the stage and seeing all new faces," she says, over the phone from New Orleans. "It's inspiring, actually."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2002
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre has extended its season through Sunday, ending the way it began in May, by rocking the dock with high-voltage talent. "Rock Around the Dock - Take II" is a bolder, brassier show with a dazzling set constructed of yards-high wedges of vibrant color that makes a great backdrop for a dynamic ensemble of singers and dancers. Directors Jeff Hitaffer and Kevin Wheatley, who conceived the idea of opening the company's current season with a rock show, are back directing this latest incarnation.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 26, 1998
I GOT A CALL from a guy I know named Carl. It was a cry for help. Carl is a successful man in his 40s, but sometimes even successful people, when they are in need, have to reach out to their friends, and I am proud to consider Carl a friend, even though for my 50th birthday he gave me some kind of reptile egg, which thank God never hatched.It took some effort for Carl to overcome his masculine pride and tell me what was on his mind. It was something that I believe is on the mind of a lot of guys, although they cannot always admit it."
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Les Paul's innovations changed our sonic universe, but at this moment in Baird Auditorium he wants to talk about the time this kid walked up to the stage in Tulsa, Okla., and asked to play his guitar."I handed him the guitar and he played it and he was just great," says Paul, pausing before dropping his bomb. "It was Charlie Christian."Charlie Christian! The story is perfect. Les Paul, who practically invented the solid body electric guitar, meets Charlie Christian, who is just a kid then but will grow up to be the electric guitar's first hero.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 2, 1995
Now that Natalie Merchant is touring in support of her first solo album, "Tigerlily," things feel a little different in performance.Granted, some of that is to be expected. After spending more than a dozen years as the singer for 10,000 Maniacs, seeing a different set of musicians onstage every night is obviously something of an adjustment. Not that Merchant objects to the change."I like looking around the stage and seeing all new faces," she says, over the phone from New Orleans. "It's inspiring, actually."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 7, 1995
Given Tad Doyle's not inconsiderable bulk, it's hard to suppress visions of diet cola and Stairmasters when he says that Tad has "slimmed down."What he means, though, is that his band -- that Tad -- is smaller than it used to be. "We lost a member and became more focused and undiluted," he says, over the phone from a diner in Ft. Wayne, N.J. "I have what [Dinosaur Jr. guitarist] J. Mascis calls the biological advantage. I was playing left- and right-stereo guitar; I was playing both by myself, rather than with another guitar player."
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | September 19, 1994
NEW YORK -- Vitas Gerulaitis, who rose from the public courts of Brooklyn and Queens to become the No. 3 men's tennis player in the world, was found dead yesterday at a friend's home in Southampton. He was 40.The Southampton village police said that Gerulaitis' body was found shortly after 3 p.m. A preliminary medical examination indicated that he suffered a heart attack while sleeping, said his sister, Ruta. An autopsy was scheduled for today by the Suffolk County Medical Examiner's office.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2004
MUSICIANS WITH fiddles, guitars and a banjo ukulele belt out toe-tapping, old-time mountain music in Thunder Hill most Saturday evenings as part of Howard County Appalachian and Old Time Music. The group, run by Thunder Hill residents Howard Zane and his wife, Sandy Hofferth, jams in the couple's home or on their back deck, as visitors and the couple's 11 cats and 13-year-old dog listen. "The music really pulls you back into history," said Lisa Roberts, a fiddler and banjo player from Baltimore who has attended the sessions for 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 10, 1993
EL MARIACHI(Columbia TriStar, rated R) 1993"El Mariachi" drew some attention at film festivals perhaps as much for its having been produced for a mere $7,000 by a film-school student as for its actual caliber or quality.The film smacks of a film-school production, complete with jerky editing for effect rather than fluidity, attempts at laughs by speeding up the film, and slow-motion dream sequences that were probably needed to pad the running time (which is still only 81 minutes). Also, all the sound was dubbed later, making it sound like a foreign film that has been dubbed in English, except here the actors still speak in Spanish (there are English subtitles)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considin and J. D. Considin,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 8, 1994
When John Michael Montgomery was a kid, he never figured he'd end up as a big-time country music singer. In fact, he never thought he'd be a singer at all."I was a guitar player," he says. "When I got in a band, my objective was to be a good guitar player. I actually focused on that before I even focused on being a lead singer -- or being asinger, period."I'm probably more accomplished on guitar," he adds, over the phone from a tour stop in Champaign, Ill. "I used to spend three to five hours a day, every day, just playing guitar and learning.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 10, 1993
EL MARIACHI(Columbia TriStar, rated R) 1993"El Mariachi" drew some attention at film festivals perhaps as much for its having been produced for a mere $7,000 by a film-school student as for its actual caliber or quality.The film smacks of a film-school production, complete with jerky editing for effect rather than fluidity, attempts at laughs by speeding up the film, and slow-motion dream sequences that were probably needed to pad the running time (which is still only 81 minutes). Also, all the sound was dubbed later, making it sound like a foreign film that has been dubbed in English, except here the actors still speak in Spanish (there are English subtitles)
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