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By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 14, 2012
A new Guinness Book of World Records was released this week, filled with the world's longest, fastest, biggest, smallest, most prolific and most substantial. Included among this compelling compendium of the world's greatest are a handful of Marylanders -- although (sadly) Ocean City is not included; Last month, it fell a few hundred two-pieces short in its attempt to establish a world record for most participants in a bikini parade. Ridgely's Chad Elchin, for instance, has reigned for 11 years as the record holder for most consecutive loops with a hang glider.
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HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
As a high school senior at Baltimore City College in 1989, Bala Ambati had some rather lofty goals, telling the yearbook he aspired "to become a doctor, win the Nobel Prize and help humanity. " By then Ambati already stood apart from his 12th grade-classmates: He was 11 years old. After graduating from City, Ambati's exceptional arc continued. It took him only two years to polish off a biology degree at New York University. At 13, he slowed down, taking the usual four years to earn a medical degree from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York.
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NEWS
By FRED RASMUSSEN and FRED RASMUSSEN,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1996
For Jared R. Beads, the Westport marathon runner known as the "human running machine," taking a daily 26-mile run was as much a part of his normal routine as eating breakfast, going to work and spending time with his family.Mr. Beads, in "The Guinness Book of Records" for five years for having the longest nonstop run, died Saturday at Frederick Villas Nursing Center in Catonsville of complications from a stroke suffered several years ago. He was 68.The familiar runner, who seemed to be all over the city at once in his running prime, was known not only for his unconventional approach to the sport but for his persistence as well.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
March 1, 2002: The Ravens release Elvis Grbac, the expensive but mistake-prone quarterback they wooed last year instead of re-signing Trent Dilfer, who'd helped them win the Super Bowl . Grbac committed 26 turnovers in a 10-6 season as the Ravens lost in the division playoffs. Feb. 26, 1996: Team officials begin efforts to name Baltimore's new NFL franchise. "We're using some old suggestions," says David Modell, son of team owner Art Modell . "I'm sure people can extrapolate that names like Ravens, Bombers, Bulldogs and Marauders are on the list.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2004
Chauncey Whitehead wanted quiet at the start. So the people who gathered at the Druid Hill Family YMCA for his world-record attempt didn't know what to think or say. Some read books and wrapped Christmas presents in the third-floor aerobic room as he sought to surpass the mark of 8,555 sit-ups in one hour. But when Whitehead, 42, began to cramp up 29 minutes into his quest - part of a fund-raising and holiday-toy-drive effort by the YMCA - he knew he could count on his onlookers for their support, for their voices.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
Emiliano Mercado del Toro died Wednesday at his home on the northern coast of Puerto Rico, a month after becoming the world's oldest person, his grandniece told the Associated Press. Mr. Mercado del Toro was born when Puerto Rico was still a Spanish colony and trained as a soldier the year World War I ended. He never married and had no children. In the seaside town of Isabela, he became a local celebrity after he was recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records for his longevity.
NEWS
July 4, 1998
Haji Mohammad Alam Channa, once named the world's tallest living man in the Guinness Book of World Records, died from kidney disease Thursday in Westchester County, N.Y. He was 42.Mr. Channa, a farmer from the Pakistani village of Shawan, had been sick for two years and was hospitalized last month.At 7 feet 7.25 inches, Mr. Channa was listed as the world's tallest living man in the 1997 Guinness book, slightly taller than Washington Wizards basketball player Gheorghe Muresan.David Duval Thomas,85, a principal architect of the country's air traffic control and safety system, died June 17 in northern Virginia.
NEWS
June 16, 2005
David Diamond, 89, a distinguished American composer who wrote 11 symphonies and 10 string quartets, as well as ballets and film scores, died Monday of congestive heart failure in Rochester, N.Y. Considered a traditionalist, Mr. Diamond was part of what some call a forgotten generation of great American symphonists who had a resurgence in popularity in the 1980s and 1990s. In 1995, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Clinton. Percy Arrowsmith,105, who with his wife set the record two weeks ago for the world's longest marriage, died yesterday at his home in Hereford, northwest of London, his bishop said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2001
Norris McWhirter's Book of Historical Records, by Norris McWhirter (Sterling Publishing Company, 288 pages, 24.95). From the originator and author of The Guinness Book of World Records comes this lavishly illustrated and designed addition to any coffee table or to the smallest room in the house. Beginning 680,000 years ago ("Homo erectus migrates to Europe."), it is divided by general subjects -- "Everyday Life," "The Arts," "Sports." Neither scholarly nor daunting, it is full of provocations and entertainments.
FEATURES
By Christian Hettinger and Christian Hettinger,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2003
Nothing says promotional gimmickry quite like radio morning shows and minor-league baseball. Morning shows on commercial radio are notorious for their relentless pursuit of the comically idiotic, while minor-league baseball teams like the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers have been known for such things as shooting bratwurst at fans during home games. Combine these worlds, and nothing says Fourth of July like flags, fireworks and record-breaking flatulence - at least according to the latest promotional stunt by the Bowie Baysox, sponsored by WQSR Radio and B&M Baked Beans.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 14, 2012
A new Guinness Book of World Records was released this week, filled with the world's longest, fastest, biggest, smallest, most prolific and most substantial. Included among this compelling compendium of the world's greatest are a handful of Marylanders -- although (sadly) Ocean City is not included; Last month, it fell a few hundred two-pieces short in its attempt to establish a world record for most participants in a bikini parade. Ridgely's Chad Elchin, for instance, has reigned for 11 years as the record holder for most consecutive loops with a hang glider.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2012
Shelonda Stokes has a vision for this year's African American Festival — and it's a whopper. In her second year producing the festival, she's already excited about one of its new features: a fitness-craving flashmob, with enough people to earn a place in the Guinness Book of World Records, bopping and gyrating to the tune of Beyonce singing "Move Your Body. " That part's all planned and ready to go. Now here's the dream part: One of those dancers leading the way is first lady Michelle Obama.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2012
Abbey Victor Kovens, a Baltimore travel agent who during the 1970s circled the world in record time, earning him a mention in the Guinness Book of World Records, died Wednesday of complications from heart disease at his Owings Mills home. He was 67. The son of a vending machine manufacturing executive and a homemaker, he was a cousin of the late Baltimore political kingmaker Irv Kovens. Mr. Kovens, who never used his first name, was born in Baltimore and raised near Mondawmin and later in the Strathmore Park neighborhood in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2011
The giant 1976 Bicentennial Birthday Cake that would land the city in "The Guinness Book of Records" was like a lot of ideas hatched by city government in Baltimore. While it gave the weary city beside the Patapsco a shot of well-needed national publicity, in the end it became a 35-ton embarrassment. It ended with rats, rain and a public feud that pitted then-City Council President Walter S. Orlinsky and Comptroller Hyman Pressman against one another, with the taxpayers eventually picking up the tab. Time will tell whether Labor Day weekend's Baltimore Grand Prix is a successful idea or another civic idea gone expensively bad, leaving its backers with, as Ricky Ricardo used to say to Lucy, "some splainin' to do. " The checkered flag has yet to drop on next month's Grand Prix, and already the lawyers are taking the first lap around the course in the wake of a $750,000 lawsuit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court by race founder Steven S. Wehner, who claims he has yet to be paid $575,000 by race organizers.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | July 12, 2009
For some, it was a chance to fullfill a dream of being part of the Guinness Book of World Records. For others, it was a chance to try something new and a little ... different. But for many people, it seemed like just another good reason to disrobe. The Maryland Area Naturist Society sponsored a skinny-dip Saturday in Baltimore, one of dozens of locations across North America where nudists and naturists were trying to set the first record for the Guinness Book of World Records in skinny-dipping.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
Emiliano Mercado del Toro died Wednesday at his home on the northern coast of Puerto Rico, a month after becoming the world's oldest person, his grandniece told the Associated Press. Mr. Mercado del Toro was born when Puerto Rico was still a Spanish colony and trained as a soldier the year World War I ended. He never married and had no children. In the seaside town of Isabela, he became a local celebrity after he was recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records for his longevity.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | May 31, 1992
They finished six hours ahead of schedule, but nearly came up three miles short.Eight medics at Fort Meade, out to set a world distance record for carrying a stretcher with a 140-pound dummy on board, started their endurance test believing they had to go 150 miles to top the mark set a decade ago.But as they passed the halfway point of their non-stop, two-day journey, the volunteer litter-bearers of the 85th Medical Battalion learned the ante had been upped....
NEWS
By LIZZIE SKURNICK and LIZZIE SKURNICK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 9, 2006
Carry Me Down M.J. Hyland Canongate Books / 192 pages / $23 If we got rid of the child narrator, would anybody miss him? Surely his characteristics have gone from enduring to inuring. First and most foremost, there's his fractured family, usually in the form of a drunken father and an ineffectual mother - one overly close to her charge, mourning a great and fragile beauty. His parents have often produced an alternately raging and principled older brother, already dead or soon to die, and a preternaturally innocent young sister, who utters gnomic statements and, if the older brother lives, is not long for this world herself.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 10, 2006
No one in movie history has managed to segue from lightweight TV-series star to deep-dish actor more convincingly than Johnny Depp. In the 17 years since he made his leap from Fox-TV's 21 Jump Street, he's managed the transition in a manner worthy of the Guinness Book of World Records - or the Alec Guinness School of Screen Chameleons. In his major roles he's been a shape-changer, going from the conscience-ravaged FBI agent of Donnie Brasco to the conscience-free Hunter S. Thompson surrogate ("Raoul Duke")
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