Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGuinier
IN THE NEWS

Guinier

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 14, 1993
INDIANAPOLIS -- An embittered Lani Guinier said yesterday that she had "lost respect for the political process" and that she had been "vilified as a mad woman with strange hair . . . a strange name and strange ideas."The black University of Pennsylvania law professor, who was dumped last month by President Clinton as his nominee to be the government's top civil rights official, received a heroine's welcome from the NAACP's 84th annual convention.Ms. Guinier attacked the Supreme Court's recent decision on congressional redistricting in North Carolina and said she was "alarmed" by Justice Clarence Thomas' vote with the 5-4 majority.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1998
Skirting questions about the scandal enveloping President Clinton, her former classmate, Harvard University law professor Lani Guinier said yesterday the country should focus more on the public actions of elected officials instead of scrutinizing their private lives.She added that she is "skeptical about the life of the independent counsel" position now occupied by Kenneth W. Starr.The statements came in an interview after Guinier spoke at a downtown Baltimore breakfast attended by nearly 800 and sponsored by the Community Relations Commission, a city agency that deals with civil rights and discrimination complaints.
Advertisement
NEWS
By TAUNYA LOVELL BANKS and ODEANA NEAL | June 4, 1993
The nomination of Lani Guinier to head the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department was undermined by a conscious campaign to mischaracterize her scholarly writings as radical.Seldom mentioned is that Ms. Guinier, a longtime champion of civil rights, has high-level practical experience. She served as special assistant to the head of the Civil Rights Division during the Carter administration. Subsequently, while heading the NAACP Legal Defense Fund's voting-rights litigation and legislative program, she argued the case that helped define the 1982 amendments to the Voting Rights Act.The controversy about her, however, centers not on her considerable abilities as a litigator, but on several scholarly articles she wrote since joining the University of Pennsylvannia law faculty.
FEATURES
By Jacqueline Thomas and Jacqueline Thomas,Sun staff | April 19, 1998
"Lift Every Voice: Turning A Civil Rights Setback Into A New Vision of Social Justice," by Lani Guinier. Simon & Schuster. $25. I don't know Lani Guinier, but I had recently arrived in the Washington bureau of a Detroit newspaper when her nomination as assistant attorney general for civil rights was announced. We have mutual friends and acquaintances, many from her days as a law clerk for a federal judge in Detroit, so her nomination was of more than passing - or strictly professional - interest.
NEWS
By William T. Coleman Jr | June 7, 1993
THE Lani Guinier affair gave those who know her a sense of Kafkaesque unreality.Her experience, character, respect for the law and balanced approach to the issues would have made her one of the finest assistant attorneys general ever to serve our country. She is superbly qualified, mainstream and pro-integrationist in the tradition of Thurgood Marshall.President Clinton's withdrawal of her name last Thursday not only was unfair; it was an example of political cowardice.Those intimately familiar with the history of racial discrimination in this country and with recent cases under the Voting Rights Act understand all too well the problems that Ms. Guinier addresses in her scholarly writings, which explore possible court remedies for the worst instances of racial discrimination in the political process.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau Staff writer Karen Hosler contributed to this article from Baton Rouge, La | June 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Four and a half months into President Clinton's term of office, the White House had a feel of almost starting over yesterday.An uncertain president huddled with advisers in the Oval Office to go over appointments. In a West Wing conference room, the newest senior official, David R. Gergen, introduced himself to the communications staff he will oversee. Meanwhile, Chief of Staff Thomas F. "Mack" McLarty continued with an internal staff review to see what fresh political talent needs to be brought in.Hiring Mr. Gergen last weekend was supposed to be a move in this direction.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | June 5, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Spurned Justice Department nominee Lani Guinier chose yesterday not to depart quietly and instead gave President Clinton a pointed lecture for what he had done and about what he must now do.Seldom has a scuttled nominee spoken up so vividly before leaving town. Ms. Guinier, her chances to be the government's ** top civil rights enforcer ended by the president the night before, politely but clearly retorted yesterday.She accused the president of removing her on the basis of a misreading of her views on race and politics -- essentially the same accusation that Mr. Clinton had leveled angrily at her strongest critics.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1998
Skirting questions about the scandal enveloping President Clinton, her former classmate, Harvard University law professor Lani Guinier said yesterday the country should focus more on the public actions of elected officials instead of scrutinizing their private lives.She added that she is "skeptical about the life of the independent counsel" position now occupied by Kenneth W. Starr.The statements came in an interview after Guinier spoke at a downtown Baltimore breakfast attended by nearly 800 and sponsored by the Community Relations Commission, a city agency that deals with civil rights and discrimination complaints.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 3, 1993
If all the trial balloons in the Clinton health plan were placed end to end, it would make one heck of a hot air balloon race.Everybody in Serbia is extremist except the people.New city employees must live here. Exceptions will be made for heads of department required by the City Charter to do so. They don't.David Gergen and Lani Guinier make a lovely couple.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 7, 1993
At least we don't have to learn how to spell Guinier. Or pronounce it.Bill has decided that discretion is the better part of valor. Unfortunately, he has no discretion.The new rule of politics: Appoint no one unless you can defend everything he has written, which is solved by appointing someone who has written nothing.Why don't all the local big shots who say they want to buy the Orioles join sides and outbid the other guys?
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | November 18, 1997
BOSTON -- At least no one called him a ''Quota King.'' At this point, Bill Lann Lee must be grateful for any small restraints.On Thursday, Mr. Lee was slated to became the latest casualty of the partisans who have turned the Senate chamber intoSnipers Alley. This lawyer and son of a Chinese immigrant who ran a laundry in Harlem was officially dubbed unfit for the job as the nation's chief civil rights enforcer because he believes in affirmative action.Moments before the Judiciary Committee was ready to vote him down the vote was blocked.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Advancing his criticism of California's Proposition 209 in the wake of his call for a national dialogue on race, President Clinton warned yesterday that the repeal of affirmative action could have a "devastating" impact on educational opportunities for members of minority groups.In an interview broadcast on CNN's "Late Edition," Clinton predicted that recent declines in minority admissions at public law schools in California and Texas -- which has had its own affirmative action program scaled back by a court decision -- will prompt Americans to "begin to take a different look" at efforts to eliminate racial preferences in hiring or admissions.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1995
Lani Guinier just wants to talk about it.Yes, the woman most famous for the job she didn't get unwittingly keeps paraphrasing the advertising slogan made famous by local attorney Stephen L. Miles as she moves through her appearances yesterday at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.In fact, she is so eager for dialogue that she misreads the sign instructing her to speak directly into the microphone for a question-and-answer session with honors students."It says, 'Please talk into mike,' " she notes.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Just 16 years ago, at precisely this point in his first term, President Jimmy Carter's advisers began to demonstrate their uneasiness about his political vulnerability. New professionals were added to the White House staff, and Carter began a calculated campaign to convince columnists and television anchors that the concerns about him inside the Beltway were exaggerated.The fear among advisers to that Democratic president was that the perception within the political community of Carter as ineffectual would begin to -- as poll-taker Patrick Caddell phrased it at the time -- "ripple out to the rest of the country."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston | April 17, 1994
When historians of the future tote up the many acts of prodigious ineptitude in the first year of Bill Clinton's presidency, they are likely to put at or near the top of their list his sacking of Lani Guinier -- the spurned first choice to be the government's top civil rights official.Ms. Guinier's book, put forth as an answer to all of her critics, is a good measure of what Mr. Clinton's surrender cost him, his administration and, perhaps, the nation.The book could rank as one of the most important political documents in the modern struggle for political freedom and equality for America's blacks.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Lyle Denniston and Karen Hosler and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 11, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Congressional Black Caucus, the group that vetoed one of President Clinton's earlier choices for the government's top civil rights post, unanimously endorsed yesterday the current choice: Boston lawyer Deval Patrick."
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,Los Angeles Times | May 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- C. Lani Guinier, President Clinton's choice to head the Justice Department's civil rights division, is quickly becoming the Robert H. Bork of the left.A voting-rights attorney who once battled to give blacks a chance to win elections in the South, she has spent the past four years as a University of Pennsylvania law professor writing about new strategies for ensuring political fairness and "empowerment" for minorities.But like Judge Bork, her many writings on touchy subjects have given her critics the words with which to brand her an extremist outside the mainstream.
NEWS
May 23, 1993
The Clinton administration may be on the verge of undermining federal enforcement of civil rights after 12 years of Reagan-Bush neglect and regression. Instead of restoring the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division to its proper role as vigorous guardian of minority rights, it is about to embroil that beleaguered office in a troubling quarrel. President Clinton has nominated a brilliant but provocative law professor, Lani Guinier, to become assistant attorney general in charge of civil rights.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 4, 1994
Washington. -- How surprised I was to hear that the same hive of conservative legal thinkers who brought down the nomination of Lani Guinier to be President Clinton's civil-rights enforcement chief was gathering its swarm to sting her long-awaited successor, Deval L. Patrick.Barring any embarrassing skeletons, Mr. Patrick would seem to be the perfect nominee, personally, professionally and politically.Personally, he has an inspiring poverty-to-prominence success story. A 37-year-old product of one of Chicago's poorest South Side neighborhoods, he earned a scholarship to exclusive Milton Academy through ''A Better Chance,'' a program that sends bright, promising ghetto kids to exclusive Eastern prep schools.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- John Payton, a lawyer who argued one of the most significant civil rights cases of the last decade before the Supreme Court, has emerged as a leading candidate to head the civil rights division in the Justice Department, according to Clinton administration officials.Mr. Payton, who is currently the corporation counsel for the District of Columbia, represented the city of Richmond in its unsuccessful effort to defend a program that set aside 30 percent of its business for minority contractors.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.