Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGuinea Pig
IN THE NEWS

Guinea Pig

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | October 2, 1993
Andy has a bad attitude. He's a plotter and a prankster, the kind of a dog that, had he been a person, would be a con man. smart, that dog, smart enough to figure out the angles and bide his time until a situation is more to his taste.And when it comes to taste, that of the little guinea pig, Jeepers, has been on his mind for months.I've told Andy to quit thinking about it many times, catching his eye, pointing to the cage and issuing a stern order, "Leave it."Andy takes this as he takes all other commands -- with an outward show of agreement and the look of the devil in his eyes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 11, 2014
In regard proposals to increase the speed limit on some Maryland roads ("Sixty-five (still) saves lives," March 3), I have driven a moving truck, with attached flatbed trailer, carrying my car, two cats, one dog, my son and a guinea pig, across country. Any Maryland legislator who thinks that making that trek at 70 mph would be a good idea is welcome to try. It was bad enough at 55 mph. R. Beitler, Owings Mills - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JOEL I. CEHN | March 2, 1994
Oakland, California.--In 1968, I was an undergraduate student at a college in New England. From friends, I heard of an easy way to make $500. Just become a medical research subject.Several of us volunteered. One day I was told that I would be spending a few hours in the lab. I would be hooked up to tubes and various gadgets, then injected with a radioactive tracer. Being a physics major, I had done some work with radiation, and I went through with the test.At the time, this test did not seem that extraordinary.
NEWS
December 4, 2013
Pigs will soon fly in Hampden. Guinea pigs, that is. Bazaar, purveyors of "oddities and curiosities" on Chestnut Avenue, will be offering a six-hour class in "fantasy creatures taxidermy" on Jan. 19. During the class — taught by renowned taxidermist Katie Innamorato — students will fashion winged guinea pigs. Before you get your fur ruffled over the thought of taxidermy-ing the poor little creatures, the store's co-owner, Greg Hatem, said the guinea pigs are "ethically sourced.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
It was the size of a buffalo and weighed three-quarters of a ton. Eight million years ago, it roamed the swamps of coastal Venezuela, using huge incisors to munch on grass and aquatic plants. What was this daunting prehistoric creature? A guinea pig - a very, very large guinea pig. A group of international researchers announced yesterday that they had for the first time reconstructed the prehistoric creature's appearance. Known as Phoberomys pattersoni, the newly described animal is the largest rodent that ever lived - about 10 times bigger than the largest living rodent, the capybara, a South American herbivore the size of a large dog. "This is a great find.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | March 7, 1992
To most dogs, there's little difference between a feral rat, a squirrel and a guinea pig.A rat is Prey, pure and simple. A squirrel is Prey With Fuzzy Tail. A guinea pig is Prey, No Tail, Extra Plump (mmmmm!).It doesn't matter much that we think of the same animals a little differently -- as Disgusting Vermin, Cute Little Wild Creature and Fuzzy Pet With Shoebutton Eyes and Twitching Nose. Every fiber of a dog's being tells him that these are all pretty much the same thing -- lunch.Knowing this, I wasn't really surprised at my younger dog Andy's reaction to the temporary addition of Geepers, a black-and-white guinea pig, to the household menagerie.
NEWS
May 5, 1993
Several weeks ago, the Baltimore Teachers Union sent a "Dear Colleague" letter to its members announcing that it has started a "Take Back Our Schools" campaign designed to persuade Superintendent Walter Amprey and the school board to end all "experimental programs.""What's really wrong here?" the letter asked. "The truth is that the experimental programs haven't made one iota of difference in the classroom. . . . It's time to quit making guinea pigs out of our students, teachers and school employees."
NEWS
March 11, 2014
In regard proposals to increase the speed limit on some Maryland roads ("Sixty-five (still) saves lives," March 3), I have driven a moving truck, with attached flatbed trailer, carrying my car, two cats, one dog, my son and a guinea pig, across country. Any Maryland legislator who thinks that making that trek at 70 mph would be a good idea is welcome to try. It was bad enough at 55 mph. R. Beitler, Owings Mills - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2001
At the popular petting barn at the Carroll County 4-H & FFA Fair, children can get into a hay-covered pen with a sleepy calf, a docile kid goat and a timid lamb. They can cuddle a guinea pig, stroke a downy duckling, make faces at a llama and watch a month-old colt prance around its mother. "Even at this young age, children should learn about farms and what farmers do and see the things farmers use," said Ronna Estrella of Taylorsville, who toured the Westminster fairgrounds yesterday with her daughter Madelyn, 2. While many other county fairs fill their midways with high-flying rides and glitzy exhibits, the 104-year-old Carroll fair stays with down-home basics: farm animals, agricultural technology and culinary and craft displays.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 8, 1995
Every time I struggle with the kid's bedroom door, I tell myself that some day soon I should fix that thing.Now the only way I can close the door is if I first flip up the corner of the rug on the bedroom floor. If the rug is moved, the door glides above the section of bare wood floor and closes easily. But if the rug remains in the door's path, then the door's bottom grabs the rug and refuses to move.Keeping this door closed is important. It is a major barrier between me and the gerbils.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
Pigs will soon fly in Hampden. Guinea pigs, that is. Bazaar , purveyors of "oddities and curiosities" on Chestnut Avenue, will be offering a six-hour class in taxidermy on Jan. 19. During the class -- which is taught by renowned taxidermist Katie Innamorato -- students will fashion winged guinea pigs. Before you get your fur ruffled over the thought of taxidermy-ing the poor little creatures, the store's co-owner, Greg Hatem, said the guinea pigs are "ethically sourced.
NEWS
By Allen M. Hornblum and Jeffrey Ian Ross | February 3, 2009
We keep hearing that President Barack Obama is intent on correcting the excesses of the previous administration, whether it's waterboarding or dirty air or international relations. But how about this: There exists the possibility that prisoners in American jails could be used for "voluntary" experiments - clinical trials for drugs, new surgical procedures and the like. It's a troubling piece of Bush-era business that the president could correct with the stroke of a pen. For more than two years, we, as members of a liaison panel advising the Institute of Medicine, have been waiting for an answer from the secretary of health and human services concerning the troubling potential for inmates in American prisons to be used for experiments.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | July 18, 2006
According to his attorney, Darius Spence was the perfect mark: a heroin addict so desperate for a fix that he would "test" the product for his longtime friend before the drug dealer would buy the goods in New York City. His unusual role as a human "guinea pig" for a major drug organization led to his appearance in federal court yesterday. Spence, 35, of Baltimore was sentenced to more than 11 1/2 years in prison for heroin possession. Chief' U.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg said that the length of the sentence could be attributed in large part to Spence's designation as a career offender.
FEATURES
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2005
The plight of the piggly-wigglies -- that is to say, guinea pigs -- had gnawed at Sue Wilmot for nearly a decade. Nothing saddened her like the spectacle of the average animal shelter, where unwanted guineas inhabit cracked aquariums, in many cases denied their favorite snacks of fresh parsley and watermelon and the ping-pong balls they like to play with. During visiting hours, children descend on them, hands grasping like talons. At night, the guineas cower beneath the slit-eyed surveillance of rows and rows of cats.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 14, 2005
Michigan researchers have restored hearing in deaf mammals for the first time, a feat that represents a major step toward the treatment of the 27 million Americans with acquired hearing loss. By inserting a corrective gene with a virus, the team induced the formation of new cochlear hair cells - key intermediates in converting sound waves into electrical impulses - in the ears of artificially deafened adult guinea pigs. They later demonstrated that the animals responded to sounds, according to the study published today in the journal Nature Medicine.
NEWS
May 23, 2004
THE FEDERAL government is trying to prove that if it acts as broker, then smart shoppers with lots of time, patience, determination and, ideally, computer access and savvy can save money on medicine through the forces of competition. The experiment might prove successful, but it's hard to imagine a more unsuitable test market than low-income elderly people. Medicare has assembled a dizzying array of offers from companies selling drug discount cards to retirees who lack insurance coverage; in some cases, the mere posting of comparative prices on Medicare's Web site has already driven them down.
NEWS
August 27, 1993
Bells no longer toll in the school yard to herald a new year. Those are relics of a simpler time. Now there are electronic buzzers, and the business of educating has grown increasingly complex.Despite the many changes, Howard County schools, which open Monday, have maintained a sterling reputation that should make nearly every parent proud and reassured. Besides consistently scoring above U.S. and state averages on the national achievement tests, Howard has scored No. 1 in the Maryland School Performance Report Card for three years running.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | May 1, 1993
When it comes to animals, I simply couldn't make up anything better than the stories I run across.The day before Easter, for example, I'd written against impulsively buying a baby bunny as a holiday gift. The morning that column appeared, I moved the guinea pig, Jeepers, into a larger cage, setting the old cage -- battered and smelly -- out front next to the garbage can. I meant to scrub it out later and store it in the garage.That night, I was walking to a neighbor's house when a car slid to a stop next to me. I fought back that little twinge of panic we all feel these days and was relieved to hear a slightly agitated female voice and the sound of a crying child drift out of the car when the window came down.
NEWS
By Esther Schrader and Esther Schrader,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon suspended compulsory vaccination of U.S. troops against anthrax yesterday after a federal judge ordered the military to stop treating its personnel like "guinea pigs." U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan ruled that the mandatory inoculations, administered to hundreds of thousands of troops annually since 1998, were in violation of a law passed that same year prohibiting the use of certain experimental drugs on troops. A spokesman for the Justice Department, which represented the military in the case, said the Pentagon "will have to follow the judge's order" and instruct medical personnel at U.S. military facilities around the world to temporarily halt the vaccinations while it reviews the ruling.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
It was the size of a buffalo and weighed three-quarters of a ton. Eight million years ago, it roamed the swamps of coastal Venezuela, using huge incisors to munch on grass and aquatic plants. What was this daunting prehistoric creature? A guinea pig - a very, very large guinea pig. A group of international researchers announced yesterday that they had for the first time reconstructed the prehistoric creature's appearance. Known as Phoberomys pattersoni, the newly described animal is the largest rodent that ever lived - about 10 times bigger than the largest living rodent, the capybara, a South American herbivore the size of a large dog. "This is a great find.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.