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Guilty Plea

NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 16, 2002
A former Carroll County student teacher received probation yesterday after pleading guilty to a single charge of allowing an under-age high school student to drink alcohol at a party at her Westminster home last year. The sentencing ends a case that began with more serious felony charges alleging that Tracie L. Mokry, 22, of Westminster had sexual relations with two boys. Mokry will have no criminal record if she successfully completes one year of probation, pays a $100 fine and court costs and performs 50 hours of community service.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Nearly 20 years after a little girl's beaten body was found in a wooded area of Rosedale, and 19 years after an innocent man was sentenced to death for that killing, the Dawn Hamilton murder case ended yesterday when her true killer pleaded guilty in a Baltimore County courtroom. Kimberly Shay Ruffner, a former East Baltimore man with a history of sexual attacks, acknowledged that he alone had sexually assaulted and murdered the 9-year-old girl in 1984. He was sentenced to life in prison; he is already serving time for an unrelated assault.
NEWS
By WALTER F. ROCHE JR. AND CHUCK NEUBAUER and WALTER F. ROCHE JR. AND CHUCK NEUBAUER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 22, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Promising to cooperate fully in a burgeoning federal investigation that has engulfed Congress, a former partner of lobbyist Jack Abramoff entered a guilty plea yesterday to a charge that he and the lobbyist conspired to bribe public officials, including a senior Republican member of Congress, and defrauded Indian tribes of millions of dollars. "Guilty, your honor," Michael P.S. Scanlon told U.S. District Judge Ellen S. Huvelle, pleading to one criminal conspiracy count leveled against him. Scanlon faces up to five years in prison and agreed to make restitution of $19.6 million, half the amount that prosecutors say he and Abramoff split in profits from four Indian tribes.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | June 9, 1993
Baltimore County's long-running drunken-driving case against John Charles Glaser threatened to start anew yesterday when Glaser said he didn't like the three-year sentence he got for killing a Dundalk man in 1989.Glaser, who has been up and down through the appeals process over the last four years, said he might withdraw his guilty plea if it would mean more time in jail.That would mean another full trial for Glaser, who served 22 months in prison in connection with the case on a conviction that was ultimately overturned.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1996
The man accused of killing Pearl Elizabeth Moffett took back his guilty plea to her murder yesterday, telling a judge he had been engaged in "a tug of war" with his attorneys.Baltimore Circuit Judge Clifton J. Gordy Jr. granted Andre Edwin Allen's request. He could face life without parole if convicted at trial.Allen, 35, pleaded guilty March 25 to first-degree murder for shooting Moffett on June 9 as he attempted to rob her outside a Waverly bank. Allen also had pleaded guilty to one count of robbery with a deadly weapon in the kidnapping and robbery of a Baltimore family June 25 -- another plea he took back yesterday.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1990
In a plea bargain, a 21-year-old Reisterstown woman today pleaded guilty to automobile manslaughter for the death last summer of Ryan Garth Davis Shanahan, a 3-year-old who was run down by a car as he played in his back yard.Amy Bolte entered her guilty plea in Baltimore County Circuit Court before Judge Leonard S. Jacobson. In exchange for the plea, charges of driving while intoxicated, reckless driving and alteration of her license were dropped.John Cox, the assistant state's attorney handling the case, said the state had agreed not to recommend a specific sentence, but would argue for a "significant sentence."
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
A Randallstown businessman accused of illegally steering $10,000 in campaign donations to Rep. Elijah E. Cummings through phony donors pleaded guilty yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Walter Wallace E. Hill Jr. acknowledged that he asked employees at ECS Technologies - a computer hardware company with extensive government contracts - to write personal checks to Cummings' 1996 campaign, then reimbursed them with company money. Hill, 49, a vice president and part owner of ECS, faces up to a year in prison and a $100,000 fine for his role in the "straw donor" scheme.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | December 18, 1991
The case of a Stevensville man whose conviction for automobile manslaughter was reversed because he paid a $35 fine may be headed back to the appeals court, after his guilty plea yesterday in Baltimore County Circuit Court to driving while intoxicated.Judge John Grason Turnbull II sentenced John Charles Glaser, 37, to one year in prison. He was freed because he has served almost two years since being jailed in the June 30, 1989, traffic death of Everett Jones, 30, of North Point.Immediately after that accident, Mr. Glaser paid a $35 fine for driving the wrong way on the Beltway in the crash.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1998
Every day, defendants pleading guilty to crimes in Maryland courts are advised that they are giving up a variety of rights,including trial by a jury. That standard warning might soon include something new: notice that the guilty plea could affect immigration status.The proposal by the Standing Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure of Maryland's highest court is a sign of the state's growing foreign-born population, up 30 percent since 1990 to 406,000 last year, according to the Maryland Office of Planning.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | April 29, 1991
A federal judge has refused to let former Bethesda accountant Joel D. Davis withdraw his guilty plea to a charge of conspiring to murder an IRS agent on a claim that the plea was involuntary.Chief Judge Walter E. Black Jr. ruled Friday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that Davis' plea in the murder conspiracy case last summer "was in no way coerced or involuntary," the legal standards for withdrawing a plea.In a complicated legal argument, defense attorney Nathan Lewin claimed that Davis pleaded guilty to the murder conspiracy because he was not allowed to appeal alleged judicial errors in an earlier racketeering-mail fraud case until after he was sentenced in both cases.
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