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Guilt

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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 11, 2014
On the 40th anniversary of Richard Nixon's resignation as president, his admission of guilt has finally been made public in a 1983 videotaped interview with him by an old White House aide. Speaking of the "smoking gun" White House tape in which he talked about raising hush money for the arrested Watergate burglars, Nixon tells aide Frank Gannon: "This was the final blow, the nail in the coffin. Although you didn't need another nail if you were already in the coffin, which we were.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jessica Evans and For The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Grab your business suit and briefcase, because It's trial time in New Jersey. In this episode, Teresa G. deals with her trial on charges of mortgage fraud. Prior to the trial, we see her praying for God's protection. After the trial, her attorney makes a statement on behalf of her that she pleads guilty. There are more technical issues at hand with the trial, but it's too complicated. Dina  gathers the girls to help her plan an event for her charity, Project Ladybug, that raises money for children with cancer.
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NEWS
April 8, 2010
The invoices are trickling into City Hall for former Mayor Sheila Dixon. The latest is that the city was billed by her hair stylist. What's next? Starbucks bills? Athletic center invoices? As we attempt to distance ourselves from our former mayor, the reminders continue to prove that she obviously put herself into a position of self-serving greed while city children went without food and homeless citizens combed the street corners for handouts. Does Ms. Dixon feel any guilt?
NEWS
August 19, 2014
The Baltimore Sun's recent article on a man charged, arrested and detained pending trial for a robbery that occurred while he was in jail on a different charge (" Man charged with street robbery that happened while he was in jail Aug. 14) highlights a serious and pervasive problem with the way pretrial release determinations are made in Maryland - namely that judges erroneously believe they are required to accept the prosecution's allegations as true for the purpose of determining whether to detain or release a defendant.
NEWS
By LINDA L.S. SCHULTE | October 22, 1991
Laurel -- You know the commercials.A small child is sitting in a corner. His mother is packing up the household belongings. When the child asks why, the mother explains that the single reason for the family move is that people aren't buying daddy's products anymore.''Why?'' asks the child choking back the tears.''I don't know'' says Mommy, mystified.Perhaps it's because Daddy's products are as poorly made as the commercial. Daddy needs to get a life. The scary part is to think about where this kind of guilt-by-advertising could lead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2004
Baltimore-born Alger Hiss (1904-1996) was the central figure in one of the Cold War's most sensational espionage cases. Raised in Bolton Hill and educated at City College, Johns Hopkins University and Harvard Law School, Hiss was a New Dealer who served in the departments of Agriculture, Justice and State. After World War II, he helped draft the United Nations charter and was president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. In 1948, Whittaker Chambers, a self-professed one-time communist spy, testified before the House Un-American Activities Committee that Hiss had been a member of his espionage ring and had given him classified State Department documents.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott | September 27, 1992
Sorrow, anxiety, relief, resentment, guilt. These are some of the emotions you may be feeling if you've survived one or more recession-driven corporate cutbacks while others have not.It's survivor guilt, say the experts, the same guilt that people feel when they live through a natural disaster that others do not survive, or survive a plane crash, guerrilla attack, armed robbery, plague or other catastrophe while others do not.The survivor guilt that you...
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | March 17, 1992
I am woman, hear my guilt.There are many things we women feel guilty about, from being too tired to cook the family dinner and sort the laundry to leaving the new baby to return to a career.Now it's time to defy these old cliches, to disallow them and not keep trying to explain and explain.Of course, guilt was built into the way we were raised: to be feminine, complying, complacent, domestic and darling -- but never too daring.Among the guilt that makes us so easily vulnerable as mothers is leaving the baby with someone else.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | April 26, 2007
Someone recently said that mass shootings, such as those at Virginia Tech and Columbine High School, are largely a phenomenon of the 1960s and afterward. If so, these tragedies can be added to the long list of disastrous consequences of the heady notions and extravagant rhetoric of that decade. What was there in the 1960s vision of the world that could possibly lead anyone to consider it right to shoot at individuals who had done nothing to him? Collective guilt is one of the legacies of the 1960s that is still with us. We are still seeing a guilt trip for slavery being laid on people who never owned a slave in their lives, and who would be repelled by the very idea of owning a slave.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | February 3, 1998
CLARIFICATIONA column by Michael Olesker in Tuesday's editions of The Sun said that a study by the Regional Economic Studies Institute in Towson found that Maryland's economy was the fifth most prosperous in the country. In fact, the May 1997 study said that Maryland had the fifth highest per capita income in the country.The latest bit of bad news for Parris Glendening is Bill Clinton. This is what some Republicans are now claiming. They think the Democratic governor could suffer integrity fallout from the current troubles of the Democratic president.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 11, 2014
On the 40th anniversary of Richard Nixon's resignation as president, his admission of guilt has finally been made public in a 1983 videotaped interview with him by an old White House aide. Speaking of the "smoking gun" White House tape in which he talked about raising hush money for the arrested Watergate burglars, Nixon tells aide Frank Gannon: "This was the final blow, the nail in the coffin. Although you didn't need another nail if you were already in the coffin, which we were.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 11, 2013
Matthew Cordle does not want your admiration. He knows some people are finding inspiration in his courage. We are told this upsets him. He thinks they're missing the point. The point is, he killed someone. Vincent Canzani was a 61-year-old photographer, Navy veteran and father of two daughters. In the pre-dawn hours of June 22, he was traveling on I-670 in Columbus, Ohio, when his Jeep was struck head-on by a Toyota Tundra speeding east in the westbound lanes. Mr. Canzani died at the scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
With Mother's Day approaching, that suggested a motherly, guilt trip-y theme for Midweek Madness. Here's the great comic duo Elaine May and Mike Nichols, presenting a classic case of a mother whose son never calls.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Two city youths charged with fatally shooting a 13-year-old girl in the chest and then hiding her body under a pile of trash in an East Baltimore alley admitted to their respective roles in the killing Tuesday afternoon in juvenile court. A 13-year-old boy tendered an admission — the juvenile court equivalent of a guilty plea — to a charge of involuntary manslaughter for accidentally shooting Monae Turnage in March. A 12-year-old friend admitted to being an accessory to the crime for helping move her body.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 16, 2011
Call me old-fashioned, but I figure the process should be like this: guilt and punishment, followed by disgrace and shame, followed by a period of humility and self-examination, followed by insight and contrition, followed by a public appeal for forgiveness, followed by hard labor in good deeds, then redemption and grace, and maybe someday (if the statutes, stars and voters allow it) re-election. That's my idea of how a corrupt American politician who betrayed the trust of the people who elected her — say, Baltimore's former mayor, Sheila Dixon — might execute a successful political comeback.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2011
The trial of Cleaven L. Williams Jr., who is charged with murder in his wife's stabbing death, opened Tuesday with the defense and prosecution agreeing on one thing: He did it. Williams was shot twice by an officer Nov. 17, 2008, while sitting on top of the bloodied body of Veronica Williams, his wife of nearly 10 years and the pregnant mother of their three young children. The dispute is not about his guilt, but whether he planned the fatal attack or if it was a spontaneous, irrational act. "There are different degrees of homicide," his defense attorney, Melissa Phinn, told the jury.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | March 10, 1994
BERLIN -- Among the recent prime-time offerings on German television was American actress Valerie Perrine sprawled nude on a bed, lustily displaying herself for a salivating Dustin Hoffman.It was a scene from the 1970s film "Lenny," a biography of self-destructive comedian Lenny Bruce, and you didn't need cable to see it.Meanwhile, playing at the same moment in Germany on U.S. armed forces television was a memorable scene from the Mel Brooks comedy "Blazing Saddles." Dusty cowboys encircled a campfire, gobbling beans.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston | October 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Americans are an argument-prone lot, with an unquenchable passion for choosing up sides on big issues of the day. No doubt, they will debate the O. J. Simpson verdict loudly and, maybe, endlessly. But, chances are, many will be talking facts or suspicions, not guilt or innocence.Millions of Americans have served on juries, in big cases or small, and most of them come away with some sense of this vital difference: Factual guilt is not necessarily legal guilt; a person who may have committed a crime, in fact, is not necessarily guilty of the crime.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
A Northrop Grumman engineer gave an Anne Arundel County prosecutor a check Friday to pay for signs supporting a slots parlor at Arundel Mills mall that were stolen during last fall's campaign, a move that his lawyer said was not an admission of guilt. David Scott Corrigan, 50, of Glen Burnie was charged Oct. 23 with property destruction and theft of $1,000 to $10,000. Police said that when arrested, Corrigan had 70 of the signs in the bed of his pickup in addition to one they said they saw him remove by the headquarters of the pro-slots campaign in Severna Park.
NEWS
December 24, 2010
The first Christmas I spent away from my family was also the first I would spend with my future wife. I was a young reporter at the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, just six months out of college, and I didn't rate time off at the holidays. But she was still in school, so she was free, and she is Jewish, so she had no pressing engagements. Hanukkah and Christmas overlapped that year. It would also be the first Jewish holiday we spent together, and I was eager to demonstrate my willingness to get in the spirit.
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