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SPORTS
By Rich Conforti and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2010
James Ellis insisted he wasn't fazed by pitching at a major league ballpark. The Poly senior's confidence was backed up by his performance Friday in guiding the Engineers to a 5-3 win over Digital Harbor at Camden Yards. "We were motivated enough because we were playing Digital," Ellis said. "It is always a big game against them." Ellis worked quickly and efficiently for the Engineers, giving up all three of his runs in the third inning while shutting down the Rams the rest of the afternoon in a rain-shortened game that was called after the fifth inning.
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FEATURES
By Sloane Brown, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The fall fundraising party season revs into high gear next weekend with a plethora of big shindigs that can cost big bucks to attend - all for a worthy cause, of course. From the Night of 100 Elvises to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Gala, tickets can go from $26 to $5,000 each. With such a broad range, you might wonder what goes into setting the price. Why does one hoopla cost so little, and another so much? Certainly, there are expenses to cover. A fancy gala that offers hors d'oeuvres, open bar, a gourmet sit-down dinner and live dance music is going to cost the organizers a lot more than a party that might have local restaurants and liquor distributors donating their wares at food stations, with a cash bar. But, there are a few more factors that go into the mix. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Maryland Chapter is one of the busiest nonprofits, with seven major parties a year, says Ann Krulevitz, the chapter's associate executive director.
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SPORTS
By Ruth Sadler and Ruth Sadler,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1995
Joe Cronin may have just about every guide book connected with professional baseball, football, basketball and hockey. But he considers himself a historian, not a collector.The retired meteorologist, who lives near Sacramento, Calif., is a member of the Football Researchers Association and is the Sacramento Kings' team historian.His collection began in the mid-1960s with a Detroit Lions guide he got at a Ford dealership. He also picked up a Green Bay Packers guide, then started writing away for others.
NEWS
By Julekha Dash | September 3, 2014
B rewer Justin Bonner admits he was once more of a wine geek. But he stopped short of buying a vineyard on the Eastern Shore when he realized just how tough it would be to grow quality grapes in Maryland. Nonetheless, the former defense contractor wanted to produce an affordable drink that that he could share with the public. He noticed more Marylanders were drinking craft beers but suspected that the supply wasn't meeting demand. So he and his partner, Kasey Turner, spent $2 million to open Jailbreak Brewing Co., Howard County's first brewery, in March.
NEWS
April 16, 2002
Downtown Partnership public safety guides are available upon request as escorts for employees leaving businesses in the 106-block Downtown Management District. Escorts are available daily from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. to walk people to a car or a transit stop. To request an escort, call 401-244-8778.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 19, 1992
Say you're a homeowner who's sick and tired of your ugly, old first-floor bathroom. You'd love to have it remodeled, but how much will it cost? How will you pay for it? And will you get your money's worth?New York attorney Stephen Pollan realized that millions of Americans ask such questions every year. With the aid of freelance writer Mark Levine, Mr. Pollan authored "The Big Fix-Up," a remodeling guide for the perplexed homeowner.Early on, Mr. Pollan offers sobering advice to do-it-yourselfers -- don't.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2002
When Junius B. Gary is on the beat as a downtown public safety guide, he takes the bitterness with the gratitude. Here's Yvonne Knight, after Gary gives the lost Landover woman directions: "Oh, God, I'm going to have a wonderful day. Thanks!" Here's a man mad at Gary for thwarting his panhandling: "Hey, take my word for it, you can train a monkey to do what he's doing!" The first reaction makes Gary beam. To the second, he smiles wanly and says, "Another satisfied customer." Gary, a 44-year-old Baltimore native, is a foot soldier in a police-trained, business-funded army of men and woman paid to keep tabs on downtown's streets seven days a week.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1996
Mike and Amy Sircy were married in Chicago on April 6. But, by their own admission, it hasn't been the most important event of this month.The couple -- he from his computer in Florida, she at her keyboard in Chicago -- first exchanged greetings in cyberspace about two years ago in romance "chat rooms" organized by America Online, a commercial on-line service provider.Encouraged by their conversations, Mike drove for a face-to-face meeting in Chicago in September. So it made sense that Amy, a homemaker, and Mike, now a computer programmer for the Air Force stationed in Germany, would spend their honeymoon in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
When people are long dead, they need a good storyteller to bring them back to life. On Friday and Saturday nights in this ghostly season, seven guides roam the streets of historic Ellicott City, sharing tales of unexplained noises, unnatural visitors and unusual visions along with a healthy dose of history from the area once called Ellicott Mills. "Every story has a source," said guide Marty Schoppert, as he set out Saturday night with a group of visitors on the "Ghosts of Ellicott Mills" tour, sponsored by the Ellicott City Tourism Council.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | September 27, 1992
Q: A group of us are going to Paris to visit the major museums -- the Louvre, d'Orsay, Pompidou, Picasso and Orangerie. Are there English-speaking guides who could go with us to visit them?A: Here are some English-speaking guides who can lead groups through the museums of Paris, or organizations that can provide them. The Pompidou museum does not accept private guides. The museum, telephone 44.78.12.33, will provide an English-speaking guide for a tour of 60 to 90 minutes for $100. To visit with a group you should make arrangements with the museum at least two weeks in advance.
NEWS
August 11, 2014
Erica Green 's recent article concerning the progressive pedagogy on tap at the Arts & Ideas Sudbury School details deeply troubling trends in education today ( "Mount Washington school redefines education," Aug. 7). Instead of insisting on the educator's authority in the classroom, school leaders misguidedly attempt to "democratize" the learning process. Their radical reforms (student proposed curricula, hiring decisions decided on by a student vote, etc.) do anything but. The tyranny of the child majority, comprised of young children still in the process of becoming, is far more oppressive than the command of any adult presence.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
There's not much better than downing an ice-cold beer on a hot summer day. But how about downing a really inexpensive ice-cold beer on a hot summer day? Yeah, that may be better. For our third annual survey, we again divided the city into four quadrants, called hundreds of Baltimore's biggest, posh-est, smallest and divey-est bars and asked for their best prices on bottles/cans, microbrews and happy hours. We're not against drafts, but we've eliminated that category this year because there wasn't much variation in price across the city.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
For longer than the U.S. has been a nation, Marylanders have been horse people. George Washington raced thoroughbred horses in Annapolis in the 1750s, 100 years after the animals were first introduced to the area. A statue of Casimir Pulaski, a Polish soldier who assisted in the founding of the American cavalry during the Revolutionary War, stands in Patterson Park. The Preakness Stakes has been run since 1875. In the 1900s, lifeguards patrolled the shores of Ocean City on horseback, looking for shipwrecks and lost swimmers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun staff | July 10, 2014
With the return of fall will come an upswing in Baltimore's arts activity, and The Sun's arts staff is keen to help our readers find local arts and entertainment events.   The Sun is collecting events information for its Fall Arts Guide, due out in September.   Baltimore arts venues and organizations are invited to submit events from September through December in the categories of classical music, dance, pop music, film, theater, visual arts and eclectic (comedy shows, festivals, lectures, unusual arts events, etc.)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2014
The Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance on Friday introduced CultureFly.org, a new site to promote Baltimore-area arts organizations. The site features event, attraction and dining listings, recommendations and discounts. It's scalable to various user devices and uses geolocation and intuitive search functions. "Baltimore has an exciting and growing number of cultural events for residents and visitors alike," executive director Jeannie Howe said in a news release. "As the region's unified voice for the arts and creative community, we wanted to help people navigate through the evolving Baltimore arts scene and discover new cultural experiences.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Capt. H. Russell "Russ" Miller III, a retired Chesapeake Bay pilot who spent more than four decades guiding ships through the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal and from Baltimore to Cape Henry, Va., died Wednesday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The longtime North Baltimore resident was 73. The son of H. Russell Miller Jr., a bay pilot, and Mary Jane Sweitzer Miller, a homemaker, Harry Russell Miller III was born in Baltimore and raised in Govans. He was a 1959 graduate of Loyola High School, where he was an outstanding basketball player.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Since her first foray into painting using a kid's watercolor set, Alice Webb has come a long way. Growing up in Annapolis in the 1950s and 1960s, she did needlework and crafted get-well cards for hospital patients at her mother's bidding. But she was never exposed to the fine arts, which weren't a focus of the nuns at St. Mary's Parish, where she attended Catholic school. It wasn't until she had two sons of her own that the Ellicott City resident of 37 years stumbled upon a life-changing aptitude for art when a teacher asked whether she could draw well enough to create a poster for a school fundraiser.
FEATURES
By Jerry Morris and Jerry Morris,BOSTON GLOBE | June 22, 1997
One of the best ways to discover America is on four wheels -- by car, truck, sport utility, minivan.And, making it easier to do the discovering are the many travel guides and computer map programs available.Recently released is " '97 Great Vacation Drives" from U.S. News & World Report. This annual magazine-style publication provides not only information on great drives but also tips on making them more enjoyable, with topics ranging from learning the rules of renting a car to keeping peace with the kids in the back seat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Second of two parts; read first article here . Brian McComas can't quite remember the first oyster he ever ate, but he guesses that before swallowing the slippery seafood, he was "a bit apprehensive. " McComas, who with wife Jennifer owns the Ryleigh's Oyster restaurants in Federal Hill and Timonium, grew up in Baltimore County but spent many hours with his grandparents, who lived on the Eastern Shore. He probably tried that first oyster around age 4, he thinks, at the behest of his Grandfather Wallace.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
Nolan H. Rogers, a former Duke University lacrosse star who later became a Maryland assistant attorney general and the official tour guide and historian for Oriole Park at Camden Yards , died May 2 of complications from cancer at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Mount Washington resident was 82. "Obviously, Nolan was present at the creation of the Camden Yards project, for which he did all of the land acquisition. He played a very important role in the development of the project," said Michael J. Frenz executive director of the Maryland Stadium Authority.
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