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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
A 62-year-old blind man has filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice claiming Baltimore paramedics refused to allow his service dog to accompany him in an ambulance after he was struck by a car. Curtis Graham Jr., a Marine who served in Vietnam, was on his way to the city's Veterans Day parade on Nov. 11 when he was hit by a car near his West Baltimore home. Paramedics would not allow Indo, his 2-year-old golden Labrador retriever, into the ambulance, Graham said. "They refused to take a service animal who I need very much," said Graham, who suffered minor injuries.
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By David Tayman, D.V.M | February 7, 2012
Q: Is it possible to teach dogs to communicate in sign language -- not just understanding signals we give but using signs themselves to communicate with us? A: This interesting question was prompted by an entry posted several months ago on the Columbia Dog Talk blog (www.columbiadogtalk.blogspot.com) about a 2009 book called “Dogs Can Sign, Too: A Breakthrough Method for Teaching Your Dog to Communicate.” Author Sean Senechal has created a system she says can be used to teach domestic animals to not only respond to sign language but to be able to express themselves using gestures, too. Most dog owners can point to actions their pets do, seemingly intentionally, in order to elicit a desired response from their humans -- ringing a bell at the door to go out, scratching at the pantry where their treats and food are kept, even bringing a leash to their owners as an invitation to go for a walk.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Evening Sun Staff | August 7, 1991
THE SOUND of a fan, the branches of a pine tree and a beautiful German shepherd named Keenen help Joseph Huffman see."When we're taking a walk on the boardwalk in Ocean City, and we go from one end to the other, I know we've reached our street, Eighth Street, when I hear the fan running in the restaurant there. It has a special sound, and just one time on that walk and my dog also knows we are at our destination," says Huffman, 64, a retired Baltimore City policeman who was blinded by a stray bullet more than 20 years ago."
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
A 62-year-old blind man has filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice claiming Baltimore paramedics refused to allow his service dog to accompany him in an ambulance after he was struck by a car. Curtis Graham Jr., a Marine who served in Vietnam, was on his way to the city's Veterans Day parade on Nov. 11 when he was hit by a car near his West Baltimore home. Paramedics would not allow Indo, his 2-year-old golden Labrador retriever, into the ambulance, Graham said. "They refused to take a service animal who I need very much," said Graham, who suffered minor injuries.
NEWS
By Newsday | December 29, 1992
NEW YORK -- On July 2, Namon Dansby was arrested on New York street corner and charged with selling crack.The arrest would have gone unnoticed except Mr. Dansby was 67, and he told police he had turned to selling drugs to buy a guide dog and false teeth.Mr. Dansby, who says he also has a bad heart, was locked up for two days until he was released on his own recognizance after his arraignment July 4. On Nov. 18, he was given a conditional discharge after pleading guilty to possession of a controlled substance, a misdemeanor.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2002
Graduating with an education degree in the spring of 1998, in the midst of widespread teacher shortages, Janet C. Mushington hardly had trouble finding a job. Turning down one offer in Atlanta, she took another in her hometown, at Baltimore's Westside Elementary. Weeks before the school year started, though, city school officials changed their minds, court records show. The school principal said Mushington, who is blind, could have the job - but only if she left her guide dog, Parke, at home.
NEWS
By Jennifer Vick and Jennifer Vick,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 10, 1997
Levi has become one of the family since arriving at the Royers' home in Westminster 13 months ago.The Labrador retriever has learned how to behave in grocery stores and restaurants, and how not to snore in church. He even checks on the Royer children while they're sleeping.Despite such good behavior, Levi won't stay with the Royers long. He has been temporarily adopted by Kurt and Debbie Royer, who raise puppies for Guiding Eyes for the Blind Inc., a nonprofit group that oversees the breeding and raising of guide dogs.
NEWS
By Jennifer Vick and Jennifer Vick,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 10, 1997
Levi has become one of the family since arriving at the Royers' home in Westminster 13 months ago.The Labrador retriever has learned how to behave in grocery stores and restaurants, and how not to snore in church. He even checks on the Royer children while they're sleeping.Despite such good behavior, Levi won't stay with the Royers long. He has been temporarily adopted by Kurt and Debbie Royer, who raise puppies for Guiding Eyes for the Blind Inc., a nonprofit group that oversees the breeding and raising of guide dogs.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | April 13, 2008
ROCKVILLE -- Calling 911 for help can get complicated when the person in need is blind and has a guide dog. Police might be reluctant to come into a house until the dog is put away. On the other hand, when the knock comes at the door, the blind person's ability to verify the officer's identity is limited, said many of those attending a conference yesterday sponsored by Maryland Area Guide Dog Users. Informing the 911 dispatcher of the guide dog's presence can help, as can calling the dispatcher back to confirm the name of the officer, some offered.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and By Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2000
Gary LeGates remembers the first day of school last year as the worst day of his life. The Westminster High School language teacher walked into his first-period Latin class and could not hear with his left ear. LeGates, who is blind, was losing another sense - the one that had become most important to him since he lost his sight during infancy. "I didn't know what to do," he recalled. "I didn't know if I could get through that class, let alone keep teaching." More than a year later, after a complicated operation in which doctors scraped a tumor from his auditory nerve, LeGates still can't hear out of the ear. But not only is LeGates, 49, teaching, he also is walking down Westminster's Main Street, strolling the grounds of his high school and enjoying the newfound freedom that has come with trading in his walking cane for a 3-year-old guide dog named Trinket.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | April 13, 2008
ROCKVILLE -- Calling 911 for help can get complicated when the person in need is blind and has a guide dog. Police might be reluctant to come into a house until the dog is put away. On the other hand, when the knock comes at the door, the blind person's ability to verify the officer's identity is limited, said many of those attending a conference yesterday sponsored by Maryland Area Guide Dog Users. Informing the 911 dispatcher of the guide dog's presence can help, as can calling the dispatcher back to confirm the name of the officer, some offered.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2002
Graduating with an education degree in the spring of 1998, in the midst of widespread teacher shortages, Janet C. Mushington hardly had trouble finding a job. Turning down one offer in Atlanta, she took another in her hometown, at Baltimore's Westside Elementary. Weeks before the school year started, though, city school officials changed their minds, court records show. The school principal said Mushington, who is blind, could have the job - but only if she left her guide dog, Parke, at home.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and By Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2000
Gary LeGates remembers the first day of school last year as the worst day of his life. The Westminster High School language teacher walked into his first-period Latin class and could not hear with his left ear. LeGates, who is blind, was losing another sense - the one that had become most important to him since he lost his sight during infancy. "I didn't know what to do," he recalled. "I didn't know if I could get through that class, let alone keep teaching." More than a year later, after a complicated operation in which doctors scraped a tumor from his auditory nerve, LeGates still can't hear out of the ear. But not only is LeGates, 49, teaching, he also is walking down Westminster's Main Street, strolling the grounds of his high school and enjoying the newfound freedom that has come with trading in his walking cane for a 3-year-old guide dog named Trinket.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
The new inhabitants at the state women's prison in Jessup frolic with each other, bathe outdoors and sometimes bark at night.Alexis, Bailey, Camry, Dottie and Hunny are Labrador retriever puppies. They're being raised by inmates at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women with the hope that the dogs will become guides for the blind.The four 12-week-old goldens and one 16-week-old chocolate spend their time eating, sleeping, working, and playing with their inmate handlers, who teach them basic commands and get them used to being with people in different settings.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
The new inhabitants at the state women's prison in Jessup frolic with each other, bathe outdoors and sometimes bark at night.Alexis, Bailey, Camry, Dottie and Hunny are Labrador retriever puppies. They're being raised by inmates at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women with the hope that the dogs will become guides for the blind.The four 12-week-old goldens and one 16-week-old chocolate spend their time eating, sleeping, working and playing with their inmate handlers, who teach them basic commands and get them used to being with people in different settings.
NEWS
By Jennifer Vick and Jennifer Vick,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 10, 1997
Levi has become one of the family since arriving at the Royers' home in Westminster 13 months ago.The Labrador retriever has learned how to behave in grocery stores and restaurants, and how not to snore in church. He even checks on the Royer children while they're sleeping.Despite such good behavior, Levi won't stay with the Royers long. He has been temporarily adopted by Kurt and Debbie Royer, who raise puppies for Guiding Eyes for the Blind Inc., a nonprofit group that oversees the breeding and raising of guide dogs.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | April 3, 1991
She can't see him with her eyes, but Ruth Peeples knows her guide dog, Smokey, is beautiful."He's so pretty. You can just touch him and know he's so sweet," said Peeples, 39, of Parkville, Baltimore County.But this black Labrador retriever survives on more than looks. He's smart, loyal, watchful and he gets Peeples safely to where she wants to go, whether it's to the dentist, the bank or a friend's house."I can say 'Find Peggy's house,' and he'll find it," said Peeples,who's been blind for about 10 years.
EXPLORE
By David Tayman, D.V.M | February 7, 2012
Q: Is it possible to teach dogs to communicate in sign language -- not just understanding signals we give but using signs themselves to communicate with us? A: This interesting question was prompted by an entry posted several months ago on the Columbia Dog Talk blog (www.columbiadogtalk.blogspot.com) about a 2009 book called “Dogs Can Sign, Too: A Breakthrough Method for Teaching Your Dog to Communicate.” Author Sean Senechal has created a system she says can be used to teach domestic animals to not only respond to sign language but to be able to express themselves using gestures, too. Most dog owners can point to actions their pets do, seemingly intentionally, in order to elicit a desired response from their humans -- ringing a bell at the door to go out, scratching at the pantry where their treats and food are kept, even bringing a leash to their owners as an invitation to go for a walk.
NEWS
By Jennifer Vick and Jennifer Vick,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 10, 1997
Levi has become one of the family since arriving at the Royers' home in Westminster 13 months ago.The Labrador retriever has learned how to behave in grocery stores and restaurants, and how not to snore in church. He even checks on the Royer children while they're sleeping.Despite such good behavior, Levi won't stay with the Royers long. He has been temporarily adopted by Kurt and Debbie Royer, who raise puppies for Guiding Eyes for the Blind Inc., a nonprofit group that oversees the breeding and raising of guide dogs.
NEWS
By Newsday | December 29, 1992
NEW YORK -- On July 2, Namon Dansby was arrested on New York street corner and charged with selling crack.The arrest would have gone unnoticed except Mr. Dansby was 67, and he told police he had turned to selling drugs to buy a guide dog and false teeth.Mr. Dansby, who says he also has a bad heart, was locked up for two days until he was released on his own recognizance after his arraignment July 4. On Nov. 18, he was given a conditional discharge after pleading guilty to possession of a controlled substance, a misdemeanor.
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