Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGuessing Game
IN THE NEWS

Guessing Game

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
Despite a five-game winning streak that has helped build his young team's confidence and the addition of two important players that have given the Terps depth and flexibility, coach Mark Turgeon is still not sure who he will start from game to game. The first-year coach has played five different starting lineups in 11 games, and he could add a sixth when Maryland (8-3) hosts Samford (3-8) Saturday at 2 p.m. "Every day is different with this team," Turgeon said Friday. "I use the word immaturity, inexperience, however you want to say it, we have a ways to go to be more consistent.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2012
Rain tires are meant for wet racetracks. Slick tires drive best on a dry course. It doesn't take a Firestone engineer to figure that out. What had Ryan Hunter-Reay muttering a prayer to Mother Nature early in Sunday's IndyCar Series Grand Prix of Baltimore, though, was the fact that only one tire type is equipped to safely handle both surfaces. And they weren't the ones zipping his Andretti Autosport car around a wet Baltimore course at nearly 90 mph. "These cars are very stiffly sprung and they're 700 horsepower, and to put that down on a city street when it's wet is one of the tougher things in racing, I think," Hunter-Reay said minutes after a controversial first-place finish.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2005
Esquire had it wrong; Atlantic Monthly had it right. Leonard Garment's book missed the mark; Ronald Kessler's was on the money. William Gaines' college journalism class flunked the test; Chase Culeman-Beckman's high school paper, though he didn't get an "A" when he turned it in in the late 1990s, should have put him at the head of the class. A three-decade national guessing game is over: W. Mark Felt, former associate director of the FBI, has revealed to Vanity Fair magazine that he was "Deep Throat," the anonymous source who leaked information to The Washington Post that helped expose the Watergate scandal.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2011
Despite a five-game winning streak that has helped build his young team's confidence and the addition of two important players that have given the Terps depth and flexibility, coach Mark Turgeon is still not sure who he will start from game to game. The first-year coach has played five different starting lineups in 11 games, and he could add a sixth when Maryland (8-3) hosts Samford (3-8) Saturday at 2 p.m. "Every day is different with this team," Turgeon said Friday. "I use the word immaturity, inexperience, however you want to say it, we have a ways to go to be more consistent.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | February 27, 2007
Kenneth K. Lam [Sun photographer]College Park -- Barring something crazy and unforeseen happening on Selection Sunday, it should no longer be a question of which tournament the Maryland men's basketball team will wind up in this season. After a complete turnaround in a matter of a month, the guessing game has been elevated to what seed the Terps will receive in the NCAA tournament, and just how far this team can go. One day after Maryland defeated No. 5 North Carolina at Comcast Center, ESPN's Joe Lunardi had the Terps listed as a No. 6 seed, but independent analyst Jerry Palm said the Terps might go even higher.
NEWS
By Photos by Monica Lopossay and Photos by Monica Lopossay,Sun photographer | November 27, 2006
Popcorn will tell on itself. "That's how you know it's done. If you just listen, it just tells right on itself," says Edward Morning, a worker at the Jeppi Nut Co., which has been in business for more than 100 years. Dozens of times a day, for 13 years, Morning has prepared popcorn and an assortment of nuts. But unlike popcorn, nuts are a guessing game. "Nuts are funny; how long you cook them depends on what country they are from and the type of nut," he says.
SPORTS
April 1, 1994
SAN DIEGO -- The guessing game over President Clinton and the Final Four is over.He's going.Clinton had been saying all week he'd like to go to the Arkansas-Arizona semifinal in Charlotte, N.C., but there were lingering doubts about whether he would attend.Those doubts ended yesterday when aides said he would fly straight from his vacation in Southern California to North Carolina tomorrow. Clinton, a diehard Razorbacks fan, was diplomatic when a Wildcats fan shouted "University of Arizona" at him during his morning jog."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chip Carter and Jonathan Carter and Chip Carter and Jonathan Carter,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 18, 2004
Back in the day, we (well, at least one of us) used to haunt the arcades in and around Atlanta, banging the heck out of those old-timey baseball games you used to see everywhere. A steel ball would shoot out from beneath the pitcher's mound, and you'd try to swat it by pressing a lever that swung a bat. The ball would rocket around the inside of the machine, falling in a hole for an out or tagging a panel for a base hit. A really sweet swing would launch the ball over the outfield wall, sending a little metal runner scurrying around the bases.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | August 13, 1991
Hey! How's about some good news for a change?OK.* At Hilton Elementary School, Hiram F. Ammons wears a mischievous smile.We are in the school's library. Excited youngsters, seated Indian-style on the floor, giggle and squirm and bounce up and down."OK," says Ammons, "this is the guessing game. This is the guessing game." He makes mysterious squiggles on his sketch pad. Then another. Then he presses it close to his chest, all the time grinning with mischievous joy. "Who can guess which animal I'm drawing.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | July 27, 1994
For the Orioles and Cleveland Indians, the 1994 season has evolved into a case of simple mathematics. It's just a little simpler for the Indians than the Orioles.After yesterday's doubleheader split, the Indians were one game behind the Central Division-leading Chicago White Sox. The Orioles are also in second place, but trail the AL East-leading Yankees by five games.The intrigue revolves around baseball's new format, which allows the non-division winner with the best record to join the postseason party.
BUSINESS
By Stephen L. Rosenstein | August 24, 2008
Setting the proper prices for your small-business products and services can be tricky. Some business owners think they have it down. But after reviewing costs, expected profit, what competitors charge and what they think customers will pay, it becomes more complex. Pricing too low can cut into your profits while overpricing can also hurt. Finding just the right balance is more art than science. A common misstep - especially, in the early stages of business - is pricing too low in order to attract customers.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | February 27, 2007
Kenneth K. Lam [Sun photographer]College Park -- Barring something crazy and unforeseen happening on Selection Sunday, it should no longer be a question of which tournament the Maryland men's basketball team will wind up in this season. After a complete turnaround in a matter of a month, the guessing game has been elevated to what seed the Terps will receive in the NCAA tournament, and just how far this team can go. One day after Maryland defeated No. 5 North Carolina at Comcast Center, ESPN's Joe Lunardi had the Terps listed as a No. 6 seed, but independent analyst Jerry Palm said the Terps might go even higher.
NEWS
By Photos by Monica Lopossay and Photos by Monica Lopossay,Sun photographer | November 27, 2006
Popcorn will tell on itself. "That's how you know it's done. If you just listen, it just tells right on itself," says Edward Morning, a worker at the Jeppi Nut Co., which has been in business for more than 100 years. Dozens of times a day, for 13 years, Morning has prepared popcorn and an assortment of nuts. But unlike popcorn, nuts are a guessing game. "Nuts are funny; how long you cook them depends on what country they are from and the type of nut," he says.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | September 17, 2006
It's not easy to count fish. You can't ask a school to hold still for a minute while you squint into the water or do a fly-by survey like bush pilots do with waterfowl. So, guesstimates are all we have in developing "the best science available," as politicians like to say. Sometimes, though, the best science turns out to be not that good at all. And outdated or shoddy science leads to suspicions and hard feelings. These days, that's the case with flounder and menhaden. We've had some good and some bad years fishing for flounder.
SPORTS
By THE ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION | October 31, 2005
ATLANTA -- Roger Hipsher of Knoxville, Tenn., is a regular at Atlanta Motor Speedway during Nextel Cup race weekends, but he can't decide whether NASCAR's Hall of Fame should be placed in Atlanta or Charlotte, N.C. NASCAR is expected to announce in December whether the Hall will be awarded to Atlanta, Charlotte, Daytona Beach, Fla., Kansas City, Kan., or Richmond, Va. If the decision was left to Hip- sher, he'd likely flip a coin. "I'm kind of divided," he said. "Charlotte is the birthplace of NASCAR, but Atlanta has a lot of history.
NEWS
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2005
Esquire had it wrong; Atlantic Monthly had it right. Leonard Garment's book missed the mark; Ronald Kessler's was on the money. William Gaines' college journalism class flunked the test; Chase Culeman-Beckman's high school paper, though he didn't get an "A" when he turned it in in the late 1990s, should have put him at the head of the class. A three-decade national guessing game is over: W. Mark Felt, former associate director of the FBI, has revealed to Vanity Fair magazine that he was "Deep Throat," the anonymous source who leaked information to The Washington Post that helped expose the Watergate scandal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 26, 1993
Hugo: "You always talked too much, Carlotta." Carlotta: "Ah, yes. It's a compulsive disease. Useful at dinner parties, but fatal in the home."This vintage Noel Coward exchange comes from his last major play, "A Song at Twilight." Coward's scripts overflow with witty, bubbling banter, and keeping it fizzing requires a style that is all too evanescent these days when "grunge" is the watchword of fashion.The Vagabonds' current production, directed by Patrick Martyn, has far more fizz than grunge, though Coward's verbiage occasionally trips up -- instead of falling trippingly off the tongues of -- some of the cast.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
The Spirit's Tim Wittman believes in the law of averages. Sooner or later, he reasoned, the ball has to go in the goal.For 30 frustrating minutes yesterday, the ball didn't go in for the Spirit. The Dayton Dynamo had a tenuous 2-0 lead at halftime, although it had been outshot by Baltimore 15-6."One had to go in," Wittman said. "We had a lot of shots. When the first one does go in, things start to come along. You can't panic and say, 'This isn't our night.' You keep going."The Spirit awoke for four unanswered third-quarter goals and went on to defeat Dayton, 8-4, before 5,518 at the Baltimore Arena.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chip Carter and Jonathan Carter and Chip Carter and Jonathan Carter,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 18, 2004
Back in the day, we (well, at least one of us) used to haunt the arcades in and around Atlanta, banging the heck out of those old-timey baseball games you used to see everywhere. A steel ball would shoot out from beneath the pitcher's mound, and you'd try to swat it by pressing a lever that swung a bat. The ball would rocket around the inside of the machine, falling in a hole for an out or tagging a panel for a base hit. A really sweet swing would launch the ball over the outfield wall, sending a little metal runner scurrying around the bases.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2002
After Cincinnati's 38-27 loss at Ravens Stadium yesterday, Bengals quarterback Jon Kitna tried to explain the guessing that often spells the difference between a completed pass and an interception, a triumph and a defeat. "Wait a split second, and you have a huge play," the sixth-year veteran said. "Or if you're a little bit off, it can be disastrous." Kitna guessed wrong three times yesterday, resulting in two interceptions that were returned to the end zone -- one for a touchdown and the other a touchback -- and a third that set up another Ravens touchdown.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.