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NEWS
By CHRISTOPHER J. FETTWEIS | June 13, 2006
Recent allegations about alleged atrocities committed by U.S. troops in Iraq come as no surprise to seasoned observers of guerrilla warfare. This ugly, messy conflict, where the line is deliberately blurred between soldiers and civilians, inevitably produces confusion, stress and extreme frustration on the battlefield. The nature of guerrilla war accelerates and amplifies the process of dehumanization of the enemy, and as an inevitable result, otherwise quite humane soldiers on both sides come to view atrocity as acceptable and even useful.
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NEWS
By CHRISTOPHER J. FETTWEIS | June 13, 2006
Recent allegations about alleged atrocities committed by U.S. troops in Iraq come as no surprise to seasoned observers of guerrilla warfare. This ugly, messy conflict, where the line is deliberately blurred between soldiers and civilians, inevitably produces confusion, stress and extreme frustration on the battlefield. The nature of guerrilla war accelerates and amplifies the process of dehumanization of the enemy, and as an inevitable result, otherwise quite humane soldiers on both sides come to view atrocity as acceptable and even useful.
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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - A steady stream of deadly attacks on U.S. forces in the past two weeks does not mean that Iraq is descending into guerrilla warfare, a top Army commander said yesterday, but rather amounts to "militarily insignificant" last gasps of Saddam Hussein loyalists. Eleven American soldiers and Marines have been killed and 12 others wounded by small-arms fire throughout Iraq by remnants of Hussein's Baath Party and his special security forces since June 4, according to the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - U.S. troops might be facing rare yearlong tours of duty in Iraq to deal with what is now being called a well-coordinated guerrilla campaign, the commander of American forces in the Persian Gulf region said yesterday. Gen. John Abizaid, the newly appointed head of U.S. Central Command, told reporters at the Pentagon that some soldiers should expect deployments beyond the usual six months of peacekeeping duty that have characterized Army missions in the Balkans and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Peter S. Green and Peter S. Green,Special to The Sun | July 5, 1991
LJUBLJANA, Yugoslavia -- The platoon of Slovenian police reservists at the Ljubelj border crossing looked like a nervous lot as their commandant raised the white, red and blue Slovenian flag above the customs house June 26.A half-mile down the winding mountain road, at the Marshal Tito army post, a detachment of federal Yugoslav People's Army troops waited with tanks and armored cars.The Slovenians, well-equipped with bulletproof vests and blue-gray uniforms, had only high-powered rifles, Kalashnikov submachine guns and a few shoulder-fired anti-tank missiles.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - U.S. troops might be facing rare yearlong tours of duty in Iraq to deal with what is now being called a well-coordinated guerrilla campaign, the commander of American forces in the Persian Gulf region said yesterday. Gen. John Abizaid, the newly appointed head of U.S. Central Command, told reporters at the Pentagon that some soldiers should expect deployments beyond the usual six months of peacekeeping duty that have characterized Army missions in the Balkans and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 13, 2002
BOGOTA, Colombia - Colombian President Alvaro Uribe declared a state of emergency and imposed a wartime surtax yesterday, taking his first steps in a presidency he promised would offer a "firm hand" against rebels. The limited state of emergency allows the government to prohibit public rallies or media interviews with guerrilla commanders, among other things, and allows for curfews, wiretapping and searches without a court order. Uribe made the announcement before dawn, after a six-hour Cabinet meeting, declaring that it was necessary to combat a recent wave of terrorism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and By Ann Hornaday,Special to the Sun | July 7, 2002
The Lobster Chronicles: Life on a Very Small Island, by Linda Greenlaw. Hyperion. 238 pages. $22.95. Linda Greenlaw's first book, The Hungry Ocean, received terrific reviews for the intensity with which the author recounted her experience as the only female swordfisherman on the Grand Banks. Greenlaw has since moved back home, to tiny Isle Au Haut in Maine's Penobscot Bay, to try her hand at lobstering. The Lobster Chronicles is Greenlaw's memoir of one particularly difficult season waiting for the hideous-looking but delectable crustaceans to swim into her traps.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | August 13, 1993
Whenever someone suggests U.S. military intervention in a dreadful conflict like the one in Bosnia, cries go up that we are likely to get bogged down in ''a Vietnam-type quagmire.''Less dramatic skeptics say, ''It's easy to go in, but how and when do we get out?''We are seeing anew the wisdom of the skeptics in the tragic unfolding of events in Somalia, where the U.S. intervened unilaterally last December for the sick and hungry people of that land. The road in was paved with welcome garlands; the path out is blocked by dead bodies and the fury of national pride.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 26, 1997
"The Devil's Own" slouches toward nowhere to be boring.Full of passionate density, the movie just sits there, like a head of cabbage boiling in its own broth. It's meant to be an adult thriller, to turn as much on issues of character and politics as on high-tech firepower and advanced pyrotechnics, but it never really clicks into life or even credibility.Adding to the general air of high folly is some genius' decision to wrap Brad Pitt's tongue around several pounds of corned beef in one of the worst Irish accents since Julia Roberts had a go at "Mary Reilly."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - A steady stream of deadly attacks on U.S. forces in the past two weeks does not mean that Iraq is descending into guerrilla warfare, a top Army commander said yesterday, but rather amounts to "militarily insignificant" last gasps of Saddam Hussein loyalists. Eleven American soldiers and Marines have been killed and 12 others wounded by small-arms fire throughout Iraq by remnants of Hussein's Baath Party and his special security forces since June 4, according to the Pentagon.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 13, 2002
BOGOTA, Colombia - Colombian President Alvaro Uribe declared a state of emergency and imposed a wartime surtax yesterday, taking his first steps in a presidency he promised would offer a "firm hand" against rebels. The limited state of emergency allows the government to prohibit public rallies or media interviews with guerrilla commanders, among other things, and allows for curfews, wiretapping and searches without a court order. Uribe made the announcement before dawn, after a six-hour Cabinet meeting, declaring that it was necessary to combat a recent wave of terrorism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and By Ann Hornaday,Special to the Sun | July 7, 2002
The Lobster Chronicles: Life on a Very Small Island, by Linda Greenlaw. Hyperion. 238 pages. $22.95. Linda Greenlaw's first book, The Hungry Ocean, received terrific reviews for the intensity with which the author recounted her experience as the only female swordfisherman on the Grand Banks. Greenlaw has since moved back home, to tiny Isle Au Haut in Maine's Penobscot Bay, to try her hand at lobstering. The Lobster Chronicles is Greenlaw's memoir of one particularly difficult season waiting for the hideous-looking but delectable crustaceans to swim into her traps.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 27, 2000
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Jibril Rajoub is Yasser Arafat's chief of preventive security on the West Bank. As a teen-ager, Rajoub fought the Israelis. As head of the Palestinian Authority's secret police, he is Israel's' necessary partner for restoring peace and combating terrorism. Rajoub, 46, is uniquely qualified for his job. During 17 years in an Israeli prison, he learned Hebrew and studied the strategy that the Jewish underground of the 1940s used to help create the Jewish state. In the confines of his cell, he translated into Arabic "The Revolt" by Menachem Begin, the future Israeli prime minister who as a leader of the underground Irgun fought to liberate Palestine from the British.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 26, 1997
"The Devil's Own" slouches toward nowhere to be boring.Full of passionate density, the movie just sits there, like a head of cabbage boiling in its own broth. It's meant to be an adult thriller, to turn as much on issues of character and politics as on high-tech firepower and advanced pyrotechnics, but it never really clicks into life or even credibility.Adding to the general air of high folly is some genius' decision to wrap Brad Pitt's tongue around several pounds of corned beef in one of the worst Irish accents since Julia Roberts had a go at "Mary Reilly."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- NATO's provisional approval of an allied evacuation plan for Bosnia puts 25,000 U.S. troops on notice that they could be headed for one of the bloodiest trouble spots on earth.U.S. and North Atlantic Treaty Organization commanders are anxious to avoid the sort of ignominious departure that characterized the final withdrawal from Vietnam and are planning a highly organized, carefully coordinated five-stage evacuation.But they also have plans for an emergency extraction, should one become necessary.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- NATO's provisional approval of an allied evacuation plan for Bosnia puts 25,000 U.S. troops on notice that they could be headed for one of the bloodiest trouble spots on earth.U.S. and North Atlantic Treaty Organization commanders are anxious to avoid the sort of ignominious departure that characterized the final withdrawal from Vietnam and are planning a highly organized, carefully coordinated five-stage evacuation.But they also have plans for an emergency extraction, should one become necessary.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Mark Matthews and Richard H. P. Sia and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | August 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As shocking pictures of slain children and emaciated prisoners deepen a visceral desire for military action to save lives in Bosnia-Herzegovina, President Bush has been struggling to forge a response that will put the fewest U.S. combat forces in peril.He has been moving closer to sending warplanes on patrol over the besieged former Yugoslav republic, even though U.S. military officials and defense analysts are increasingly doubtful that a limited operation would stem the violence against innocent civilians.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | August 13, 1993
Whenever someone suggests U.S. military intervention in a dreadful conflict like the one in Bosnia, cries go up that we are likely to get bogged down in ''a Vietnam-type quagmire.''Less dramatic skeptics say, ''It's easy to go in, but how and when do we get out?''We are seeing anew the wisdom of the skeptics in the tragic unfolding of events in Somalia, where the U.S. intervened unilaterally last December for the sick and hungry people of that land. The road in was paved with welcome garlands; the path out is blocked by dead bodies and the fury of national pride.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Mark Matthews and Richard H. P. Sia and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | August 9, 1992
WASHINGTON -- As shocking pictures of slain children and emaciated prisoners deepen a visceral desire for military action to save lives in Bosnia-Herzegovina, President Bush has been struggling to forge a response that will put the fewest U.S. combat forces in peril.He has been moving closer to sending warplanes on patrol over the besieged former Yugoslav republic, even though U.S. military officials and defense analysts are increasingly doubtful that a limited operation would stem the violence against innocent civilians.
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