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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
As coalition forces continue the push into Iraq, it is important to realize that history is full of cautionary tales for great powers that assume overwhelming military superiority will bring easy victory over an outmatched opponent. If the people of Iraq see these troops from the United States and Britain as forces freeing them from an oppressive dictator, then the war could be short and the transition to peace easy. But if they instead view the troops as illegitimate invaders of their nation, then that could help form an indigenous opposition, leading to a lengthy struggle.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - As the war in Iraq drags on, the daily violence mocks the "Mission Accomplished" banner that was a backdrop to President Bush's 2003 post-invasion flight to the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln. With the death toll of Americans surpassing 1,700, the most visible reminders to the nation of that cost are the periodic displays of photos of the dead in newspapers and on television. The president's support, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll, has plunged from 45 percent of those surveyed in February to only 37 percent.
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TOPIC
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 2003
THE UNITED STATES today finds itself mired down in a guerrilla war in Iraq a hundred years after it was mopping up its first major conflict on the far side of the vast oceanic moats that protected its mainland. In the summer of 1903, the struggle of the Philippines for independence from Americans, of all people, was virtually over. The insurgent leader, Emilio Aguinaldo, had been captured and was urging his followers to put down their arms. Senate hearings in the spring had exposed shameful atrocities on both sides.
TOPIC
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 2003
THE UNITED STATES today finds itself mired down in a guerrilla war in Iraq a hundred years after it was mopping up its first major conflict on the far side of the vast oceanic moats that protected its mainland. In the summer of 1903, the struggle of the Philippines for independence from Americans, of all people, was virtually over. The insurgent leader, Emilio Aguinaldo, had been captured and was urging his followers to put down their arms. Senate hearings in the spring had exposed shameful atrocities on both sides.
NEWS
May 17, 1995
Violence continues to overwhelm reason in the storied Vale of Kashmir. The lovely mountain state in the north of India is wracked by politico-religious violence. The latest victim is a town of 20,000 people which housed the shrine of Kashmir's Muslim patron saint. In a couple of days last week two fires swept through the town's wood structures, leveling it. Angry Muslim residents blame the Indian Army for having set both fires. Indian officials blame a band of Muslim militants who had occupied the town and defied the soldiers for months.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | September 20, 1990
LONDON -- The Irish Republican Army claimed responsibility yesterday for Tuesday's shooting of the former governor of Gibraltar, where three IRA members were killed by British security forces in 1988.Sir Peter Terry, 63, who was also military commander-in-chief of "The Rock" until he retired last year, was hit by a burst of automatic gunfire as he sat reading in his home in the Midlands village of Milford, near the town of Stafford.He was the latest in a series of public figures attacked by the IRA in England despite stepped-up security.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2002
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - With South Asia teetering on the edge of war, President Bush has imposed on Pakistan the burden of dragging it back into balance. But the question making its way through the Pakistani capital is whether President Pervez Musharraf has as much power as Bush implies. At the same time, many in India wonder whether Musharraf wants to rein in Pakistan. Earlier this week, in unusually strong language, Bush called on the Pakistani president to prevent Muslim guerrillas from crossing into the Indian state of Kashmir, where thousands of Indians have been killed in a 13-year-old insurgency.
NEWS
By Newsday | October 1, 1991
TO GET an idea of the carnage in El Salvador over the last dozen years, imagine a guerrilla war in the United States killing 3.6 million people. Proportionately, that's equivalent to the Salvadoran war's estimated 75,000 dead in a population of 5.2 million.The Salvadoran peace agreement signed at U.N. headquarters last Wednesday doesn't quite end this appalling bloodshed -- four more killings occurred the next day -- but it does lay a solid foundation for further talks in Mexico next month.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - As the war in Iraq drags on, the daily violence mocks the "Mission Accomplished" banner that was a backdrop to President Bush's 2003 post-invasion flight to the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln. With the death toll of Americans surpassing 1,700, the most visible reminders to the nation of that cost are the periodic displays of photos of the dead in newspapers and on television. The president's support, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll, has plunged from 45 percent of those surveyed in February to only 37 percent.
NEWS
October 6, 2002
FORTY-EIGHT HOURS. That's all the warning the American people will get before their sons and daughters go off to war. By then, it will be too late to ask why, too late to seriously question the reason for President Bush's all-consuming quest to oust Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, too late to stop a military campaign of bombs and battle troops that may provoke the very chemical weapons attack the president fears. But it's already too late. Or so it appears as Democrats and Republicans in Congress march in lockstep with the president on the path to war. A vote on a congressional resolution authorizing a unilateral military strike against Iraq has not yet been taken, but the deal has been cut. In exchange for a mandate for war, Mr. Bush agreed to alert Congress within 48 hours of his decision that the security of the United States could no longer be ensured through diplomacy.
TOPIC
By Trudy Rubin and Trudy Rubin,KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS | July 20, 2003
The G-word has finally become official, when speaking of the continuing Iraq war. The new U.S. commander of allied troops in Iraq, John Abizaid, voiced Wednesday what had long been evident: There is "a classical guerrilla-type campaign" being waged by loyalists of Saddam Hussein who are picking off American troops. Abizaid's frankness contrasts with Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld's public pussyfooting around the nature of the Iraq fighting. Rumsfeld has repeatedly rejected the suggestion that U.S. forces are facing organized resistance, or guerrilla warfare.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
As coalition forces continue the push into Iraq, it is important to realize that history is full of cautionary tales for great powers that assume overwhelming military superiority will bring easy victory over an outmatched opponent. If the people of Iraq see these troops from the United States and Britain as forces freeing them from an oppressive dictator, then the war could be short and the transition to peace easy. But if they instead view the troops as illegitimate invaders of their nation, then that could help form an indigenous opposition, leading to a lengthy struggle.
NEWS
October 6, 2002
FORTY-EIGHT HOURS. That's all the warning the American people will get before their sons and daughters go off to war. By then, it will be too late to ask why, too late to seriously question the reason for President Bush's all-consuming quest to oust Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, too late to stop a military campaign of bombs and battle troops that may provoke the very chemical weapons attack the president fears. But it's already too late. Or so it appears as Democrats and Republicans in Congress march in lockstep with the president on the path to war. A vote on a congressional resolution authorizing a unilateral military strike against Iraq has not yet been taken, but the deal has been cut. In exchange for a mandate for war, Mr. Bush agreed to alert Congress within 48 hours of his decision that the security of the United States could no longer be ensured through diplomacy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2002
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - With South Asia teetering on the edge of war, President Bush has imposed on Pakistan the burden of dragging it back into balance. But the question making its way through the Pakistani capital is whether President Pervez Musharraf has as much power as Bush implies. At the same time, many in India wonder whether Musharraf wants to rein in Pakistan. Earlier this week, in unusually strong language, Bush called on the Pakistani president to prevent Muslim guerrillas from crossing into the Indian state of Kashmir, where thousands of Indians have been killed in a 13-year-old insurgency.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 2001
LONDON - There is hardly anything conventional about the soldiers, weapons and tactics of the Taliban. In this supersonic age, they move largely on foot; they have fighter-bombers, but most of them don't work; their favorite strategy combines unflinching repression with fierce moral certitude. On paper, at least, it doesn't seem that the Taliban, who rule Afghanistan, are a match for the combined might of the U.S. military and British forces. Those modern and mighty armies are gathering in the region like so many dark, threatening clouds, determined to extract Saudi exile Osama bin Laden from his hiding place and crush his al-Qaida organization.
NEWS
May 17, 1995
Violence continues to overwhelm reason in the storied Vale of Kashmir. The lovely mountain state in the north of India is wracked by politico-religious violence. The latest victim is a town of 20,000 people which housed the shrine of Kashmir's Muslim patron saint. In a couple of days last week two fires swept through the town's wood structures, leveling it. Angry Muslim residents blame the Indian Army for having set both fires. Indian officials blame a band of Muslim militants who had occupied the town and defied the soldiers for months.
NEWS
October 1, 1993
The future of many once-stable Baltimore City neighborhoods is in doubt. Unabated flight of the middle class to the surrounding counties is altering the character of residential streets. Homes are being turned into rental properties as homeowners fail to sell them on the glutted market.Renters seldom have a real stake in a neighborhood. They are relatively free to move on if they do not like their lodgings or the environment.When good tenants leave because the neighborhood is changing, they are often replaced by renters who are less particular about where and how they live as long as the price is right.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 19, 1994
After 25 years, the world's longest-running guerrilla war may be entering its final weeks.The Irish Republican Army is expected to announce an indefinite cease-fire this month in its war against the British presence in Northern Ireland, according to well-placed sources.In return, the British government is prepared to "demilitarize" the Catholic neighborhoods of West Belfast and rural Catholic counties by pulling its troops out of street patrols. Britain also will ease prison conditions for IRA and Protestant paramilitary prisoners, including granting early paroles.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 19, 1994
After 25 years, the world's longest-running guerrilla war may be entering its final weeks.The Irish Republican Army is expected to announce an indefinite cease-fire this month in its war against the British presence in Northern Ireland, according to well-placed sources.In return, the British government is prepared to "demilitarize" the Catholic neighborhoods of West Belfast and rural Catholic counties by pulling its troops out of street patrols. Britain also will ease prison conditions for IRA and Protestant paramilitary prisoners, including granting early paroles.
NEWS
October 1, 1993
The future of many once-stable Baltimore City neighborhoods is in doubt. Unabated flight of the middle class to the surrounding counties is altering the character of residential streets. Homes are being turned into rental properties as homeowners fail to sell them on the glutted market.Renters seldom have a real stake in a neighborhood. They are relatively free to move on if they do not like their lodgings or the environment.When good tenants leave because the neighborhood is changing, they are often replaced by renters who are less particular about where and how they live as long as the price is right.
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