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May 2, 1996
Julio Cesar Mendez Montenegro, 80, president of Guatemala from 1966 through 1970, died of a heart attack at his home Tuesday in Guatemala City.President Alvaro Arzu declared a three-day national mourning period.Mr. Mendez Montenegro was seeking the appointment of rector of San Carlos National University when his brother, a presidential candidate, died Oct. 31, 1965. He took his brother's place on the ticket and was elected. He later served as Guatemalan ambassador to Mexico.Lester Sumrall, 83, founder of LeSEA Broadcasting Inc., a worldwide religious broadcasting system, died Sunday of bacterial spinal meningitis in South Bend, Ind.Jaime Garcia Terres, 71, a Mexican poet and essayist involved in national affairs, died Monday in Mexico City of complications from a heart illness.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Surrounded by strangers in a dusty border town just south of the United States, 17-year-old Hilda Lopez bowed her head to pray - a rare moment of peace in a journey that had allowed little time for reflection. Since leaving Guatemala three weeks earlier, she had entered Mexico on foot, traveled day and night in a truck crammed with dozens of people and slept outside, huddling next to flea-infested cows for warmth. Now Lopez was about to enter the U.S. illegally, joining a surge of unaccompanied minors who have fled Central America in recent months.
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NEWS
January 30, 1993
Haitian senators challenge governmentPORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Senators loyal to ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide mustered a quorum in the Haitian Senate and elected themselves to top posts in a clear challenge to the military-backed government, officials said yesterday.The 13 Aristide supporters, after electing themselves to the leadership posts late Thursday, were expected to try to annul the controversial Jan. 18 Senate elections organized by de facto Prime Minister Marc Bazin.There was no immediate response to the senators' action from Haiti's government or from the army, which mounted the September 1991 coup.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 1999
GUATEMALA CITY -- Lucrecia Vasquez wavers from one day to the next about whether her brother is dead or alive.The last time she saw him was in April 1984, a few months before he was to finish medical school. The phone rang, she recalled, and a moment later Omar Dario Vasquez rushed out the door. He yelled something about a medical emergency and said he would be back soon.But the 23-year-old was never seen again. And this week, his sister received what may be the first real evidence about his fate.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 1996
GUATEMALA CITY -- Guatemalans will decide today which of two conservative career politicians should become their next president. But in many respects the vote promises to be a referendum on a man who is not even on the ballot: Gen. Efrain Rios Montt.On paper General Rios Montt is merely the secretary general of the Guatemalan Republican Front, the right-wing party whose nominal standard bearer is Alfonso Portillo. But he is also a former military dictator of this Central American country; he has made it clear he would like to rule again, and he is said by his enemies to be using Mr. Portillo as nothing more than a stalking horse.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 20, 1999
GUATEMALA CITY -- Lucrecia Vasquez wavers from one day to the next about whether her brother is dead or alive.The last time she saw him was in April 1984, a few months before he was to finish medical school. The phone rang, she recalled, and a moment later Omar Dario Vasquez rushed out the door. He yelled something about a medical emergency and said he would be back soon.But the 23-year-old was never seen again. And this week, his sister received what may be the first real evidence about his fate.
NEWS
By Fiona Neill and Fiona Neill,Contributing Writer | June 11, 1993
GUATEMALA CITY -- Rosario Lopez wants to be a professional photographer when she grows up. For a 10-year-old indigenous girl living in a wooden shack on Guatemala City's garbage dump, such a wish sounds like an impossible dream.But Rosario's photos already have been exhibited as far away as Tokyo, and her scenes of life on the dump will soon be on show in Texas, Alabama and Paris."I like to take photos of animals and people working," says Rosario, who keeps her camera with her at all times.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | March 30, 1995
Washington -- IN 1974, AT a lawn reception at the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa., a young colonel in dress uniform came up to me and introduced himself by saying elliptically, "I know you, but you don't know me."Then he told me one of the strangest, most ominous stories I had heard. "When you were with the guerrillas in Guatemala in the Sierra de las Minas in 1966," he related, "I was the Special Forces adviser to the Zacapa Regiment. We had been told by the CIA that you were there."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 26, 1993
GUATEMALA CITY -- What began as telephonic safe sex has turned into a costly nightmare for thousands of Guatemalans.Attracted by advertisements in newspapers, Guatemalans flooded telephone lines with calls to phone numbers offering "Love Without Frontiers" and "Horoscope of Love."Many who dialed the advertised numbers did not realize -- or did not care -- that they were making an international phone call to Canada, at $2.95 a minute. When phone bills started arriving much later, some shocked Guatemalans suddenly faced bankruptcy.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Surrounded by strangers in a dusty border town just south of the United States, 17-year-old Hilda Lopez bowed her head to pray - a rare moment of peace in a journey that had allowed little time for reflection. Since leaving Guatemala three weeks earlier, she had entered Mexico on foot, traveled day and night in a truck crammed with dozens of people and slept outside, huddling next to flea-infested cows for warmth. Now Lopez was about to enter the U.S. illegally, joining a surge of unaccompanied minors who have fled Central America in recent months.
NEWS
May 2, 1996
Julio Cesar Mendez Montenegro, 80, president of Guatemala from 1966 through 1970, died of a heart attack at his home Tuesday in Guatemala City.President Alvaro Arzu declared a three-day national mourning period.Mr. Mendez Montenegro was seeking the appointment of rector of San Carlos National University when his brother, a presidential candidate, died Oct. 31, 1965. He took his brother's place on the ticket and was elected. He later served as Guatemalan ambassador to Mexico.Lester Sumrall, 83, founder of LeSEA Broadcasting Inc., a worldwide religious broadcasting system, died Sunday of bacterial spinal meningitis in South Bend, Ind.Jaime Garcia Terres, 71, a Mexican poet and essayist involved in national affairs, died Monday in Mexico City of complications from a heart illness.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 1996
GUATEMALA CITY -- Guatemalans will decide today which of two conservative career politicians should become their next president. But in many respects the vote promises to be a referendum on a man who is not even on the ballot: Gen. Efrain Rios Montt.On paper General Rios Montt is merely the secretary general of the Guatemalan Republican Front, the right-wing party whose nominal standard bearer is Alfonso Portillo. But he is also a former military dictator of this Central American country; he has made it clear he would like to rule again, and he is said by his enemies to be using Mr. Portillo as nothing more than a stalking horse.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | March 30, 1995
Washington -- IN 1974, AT a lawn reception at the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pa., a young colonel in dress uniform came up to me and introduced himself by saying elliptically, "I know you, but you don't know me."Then he told me one of the strangest, most ominous stories I had heard. "When you were with the guerrillas in Guatemala in the Sierra de las Minas in 1966," he related, "I was the Special Forces adviser to the Zacapa Regiment. We had been told by the CIA that you were there."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 26, 1993
GUATEMALA CITY -- What began as telephonic safe sex has turned into a costly nightmare for thousands of Guatemalans.Attracted by advertisements in newspapers, Guatemalans flooded telephone lines with calls to phone numbers offering "Love Without Frontiers" and "Horoscope of Love."Many who dialed the advertised numbers did not realize -- or did not care -- that they were making an international phone call to Canada, at $2.95 a minute. When phone bills started arriving much later, some shocked Guatemalans suddenly faced bankruptcy.
NEWS
By Fiona Neill and Fiona Neill,Contributing Writer | June 11, 1993
GUATEMALA CITY -- Rosario Lopez wants to be a professional photographer when she grows up. For a 10-year-old indigenous girl living in a wooden shack on Guatemala City's garbage dump, such a wish sounds like an impossible dream.But Rosario's photos already have been exhibited as far away as Tokyo, and her scenes of life on the dump will soon be on show in Texas, Alabama and Paris."I like to take photos of animals and people working," says Rosario, who keeps her camera with her at all times.
NEWS
January 30, 1993
Haitian senators challenge governmentPORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Senators loyal to ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide mustered a quorum in the Haitian Senate and elected themselves to top posts in a clear challenge to the military-backed government, officials said yesterday.The 13 Aristide supporters, after electing themselves to the leadership posts late Thursday, were expected to try to annul the controversial Jan. 18 Senate elections organized by de facto Prime Minister Marc Bazin.There was no immediate response to the senators' action from Haiti's government or from the army, which mounted the September 1991 coup.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 16, 1998
Guatemalan authorities have arrested a sixth suspect and are pursuing a seventh in the rape and robbery last month of a group from St. Mary's College of Maryland who were traveling near Guatemala City on an educational tour.U.S. Embassy officials and the National Civilian police in Guatemala say Roni Leonel Polanco of Guatemala City was arrested Wednesday in the capital.Polanco is one of a group of seven armed bandits who Guatemalan police allege forced the 16 students and three staff members from the Southern Maryland college from a bus and into a sugar cane field, where they robbed the victims and raped five of the women.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 2003
GUATEMALA CITY, Guatemala - Former dictator Efrain Rios Montt's bid to win the presidency at the ballot box has apparently failed, as partial results show him trailing badly behind two other candidates who will likely meet in a December runoff. With about two-thirds of the ballots counted from Sunday's election, former Guatemala City Mayor Oscar Berger, a pro-business conservative, had 38.4 percent of the vote, followed by center-left candidate Alvaro Colom with 27.6 percent and Rios Montt with 16.9 percent.
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