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November 14, 1990
It is a breakthrough. All indications are that on Jan. 14, an elected president will succeed an elected president for the first time in Guatemala's history. That is more important than the not-very-inspiring choice that will be put to voters in a run-off on Jan. 6 of the 12-way first round election for president held on Sunday.The top two are Jorge Carpio Nicolle, a newspaper publisher who has been campaigning nonstop since he came in second in the 1985 election, and Jorge Serrano Elias, an economist who served a dictator.
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NEWS
By George W. Liebmann | August 6, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley, a presidential hopeful, has taken on yet another "pop issue," proposing that we provide foster care to several thousand unaccompanied Central American minors, lest they be sent to "certain death. " He has also championed abolition of capital punishment and the establishment of gay marriage, the Dream Act, and tax credits and fueling stations for electric vehicles whose technology is not ready for prime time. Is this latest pronouncement that of an instinctive demagogue or of a thoughtful statesman?
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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Who knew that a man renowned for his progressive-minded accomplishments in advancing an educational institution would prefer to spend his leisure exploring underdeveloped lands and ancient civilizations? That, in a nutshell, describes Maryland Institute College of Art President Fred Lazarus. The Harvard graduate, widely acclaimed for launching Baltimore's once-local art college onto the world stage, is recognized as a leader in art and design education for more than three decades.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2014
Surrounded by strangers in a dusty border town just south of the United States, 17-year-old Hilda Lopez bowed her head to pray - a rare moment of peace in a journey that had allowed little time for reflection. Since leaving Guatemala three weeks earlier, she had entered Mexico on foot, traveled day and night in a truck crammed with dozens of people and slept outside, huddling next to flea-infested cows for warmth. Now Lopez was about to enter the U.S. illegally, joining a surge of unaccompanied minors who have fled Central America in recent months.
NEWS
June 1, 1993
For every two steps forward to democracy in Latin America, something like the coup by President Jorge Serrano Elias of Guatemala is an unhappy step backward.He suspended the leading organs of government, clapped key people under house arrest, slapped censorship on the media and sent the military police around to discourage protest. It was like the coup in April of last year by President Alberto K. Fujimori of Peru.Mr. Serrano's crackdown might have forestalled one by the military, say his defenders.
NEWS
June 11, 1993
The surprise elevation of Ramiro de Leon Carpio to president gives Guatemala its best chance of national reconciliation to end its permanent civil war. The turn of events earned -- and received -- resumption of U.S. aid, which is peanuts but of symbolic value.The coup, counter-coup and reverse-counter-coup in that tiny country resemble the recent power struggle in mighty Russia in one important respect. All sorts of power figures made their moves, and found they had less power than they thought, and that the democracy to which they gave lip service was more deeply ingrained in the people than they suspected.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 2003
GUATEMALA CITY, Guatemala - Former dictator Efrain Rios Montt's bid to win the presidency at the ballot box has apparently failed, as partial results show him trailing badly behind two other candidates who will likely meet in a December runoff. With about two-thirds of the ballots counted from Sunday's election, former Guatemala City Mayor Oscar Berger, a pro-business conservative, had 38.4 percent of the vote, followed by center-left candidate Alvaro Colom with 27.6 percent and Rios Montt with 16.9 percent.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | November 11, 1990
GUATEMALA CITY -- Guatemala's five-year flirtation with democracy reaches a milestone today when voters go to the polls after a bizarre, violent campaign.If the process works and a new president is inaugurated in January, it would mark the first peaceful transition from one civilian government to another in Guatemala's history.Yet no one is suggesting that democracy is firmly established in this Central American nation of 8.7 million people.The leading candidates are talking about tax rates, smaller government and a free-market economy, but the campaign has been dominated by questions of war and peace.
NEWS
By Barbara Bocek | April 25, 2001
FORKS, Wash. -- Guatemala's fragile justice system is on trial in a courtroom surrounded by armed security troops and growing political violence. The crime is the 1998 killing of Roman Catholic Bishop Juan Gerardi, who released documents pinpointing the deaths of 150,000 people and the disappearance of another 50,000 that largely were attributed to the military. The defendants include three military officers, one a former presidential aide. The plaintiff is the Guatemalan archbishop's Human Rights Office.
NEWS
By MARY JO McCONAHAY | May 30, 1993
Guatemala City. -- Unless they are reined in quickly, the anti-democratic demons unleashed by President Jorge Serrano's pre-dawn "self-coup" could spread out quickly to the rest of Central and Latin America.Clearly inspired by Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori's successful "self-coup" last year, Mr. Serrano's action will be closely watched by military and civilian authorities elsewhere on the continent. If it holds, they easily could see it as an acceptable model for bloodlessly suppressing growing discontent at a time when Latin America is considered one of the hottest economic regions in the world.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Who knew that a man renowned for his progressive-minded accomplishments in advancing an educational institution would prefer to spend his leisure exploring underdeveloped lands and ancient civilizations? That, in a nutshell, describes Maryland Institute College of Art President Fred Lazarus. The Harvard graduate, widely acclaimed for launching Baltimore's once-local art college onto the world stage, is recognized as a leader in art and design education for more than three decades.
NEWS
March 14, 2011
Bright and motivated college-bound immigrants will do Maryland proud ("A flawed compromise," March 8). These young people came here as children, are fully assimilated into American culture and want to be contributing members. We are lucky to have them working for our future. The Central Americans come from countries torn apart by wars paid for by the United States. Paltry aid for rebuilding is nothing in comparison to what we spent to damage Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala. These countries are still recovering from the murder and destruction we rained on them.
NEWS
February 18, 2008
GERMAN CHUPINA, 86 Wanted for crimes against humanity German Chupina, a former Guatemalan police director wanted in Spain for crimes against humanity, died yesterday. He was 86. Mr. Chupina suffered from Alzheimer's disease, liver and renal problems, and fractures caused by old age, his son German Armando Chupina said. His father, police director from 1978 to 1982, was arrested in November 2006 after Guatemalan Nobel Peace Laureate Rigoberta Menchu levied charges of genocide, torture and state terror in a Spanish court against him and seven other former military and government officials.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 5, 2007
GUATEMALA CITY -- Alvaro Colom, a center-left businessman, won Guatemala's presidential election yesterday, in a vote that in many ways was a referendum on the country's fragile democracy. Colom, 56, defeated former army general Otto Perez Molina, a high-ranking officer during Guatemala's years of bloody dictatorship and counter-insurgency warfare in the 1980s. With 93 percent of the vote tallied, Colom led Perez Molina by 52.5 percent to 47.5 percent. Nearly all of the uncounted votes were in Colom strongholds.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Sun Reporter | September 19, 2007
Patterson senior Denilson Pazos made five saves in his first start as a soccer goalie in last week's 1-0 win over Poly. A midfielder last season, Pazos volunteered to fill in when the Clippers were without a goalie in preseason. Born in Los Angeles, Pazos has moved back and forth from the United States to his parents' native Guatemala several times. Most recently, he lived in Guatemala from 2001 to 2006. He has attended 12 schools. He plans to graduate from Patterson, where he takes advanced placement classes and has a 97 percent academic average.
NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 23, 2007
MEXICO CITY -- Rigoberta Menchu, the Nobel Peace Prize winner and Maya Indian who has long been a symbol of indigenous pride and defiance, has announced her candidacy in Guatemala's presidential election. Menchu, 48, made the announcement after meeting late Wednesday with Nineth Montenegro, a respected human-rights activist and leader of the Encounter for Guatemala political party. Menchu will be the party's candidate in the September vote. Seen by many in Guatemala as a polarizing figure, Menchu told reporters she will run as a candidate of reconciliation and unity in a country where political and ethnic divisions have often played out violently.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 16, 1998
Guatemalan authorities have arrested a sixth suspect and are pursuing a seventh in the rape and robbery last month of a group from St. Mary's College of Maryland who were traveling near Guatemala City on an educational tour.U.S. Embassy officials and the National Civilian police in Guatemala say Roni Leonel Polanco of Guatemala City was arrested Wednesday in the capital.Polanco is one of a group of seven armed bandits who Guatemalan police allege forced the 16 students and three staff members from the Southern Maryland college from a bus and into a sugar cane field, where they robbed the victims and raped five of the women.
NEWS
October 8, 1990
GUATEMALA CITY (AP) -- Juan Jose Arevalo Bermejo, 86, a former president whose civilian government was considered a shining moment for the poor in a nation dominated by military governments, died late Saturday at the Spanish Hospital in the Guatemalan capital.The cause of death was not disclosed.Mr. Arevalo, a former university professor in the humanities, returned to Guatemala from Argentina after a 1944 popular uprising that ended the 14-year-old military dictatorship of Jorge Ubico. Becoming president the next year, he set about carrying out social reforms akin to those of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the United States.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- Panama won a two-year term on the Security Council yesterday, making the powerful body's composition for 2007 much less contrarian than the U.S. feared had Venezuela won the Latin American seat. But the new council still will include voices that could challenge the United States, such as South Africa, a leader of developing nations. Panama emerged last week as the compromise candidate to fill the regional seat, ending a protracted standoff between U.S.-backed Guatemala and Venezuela, a vocal critic of Washington's policies.
NEWS
By Letta Tayler and Letta Tayler,NEWSDAY | October 27, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- Guatemala and U.S. foe Venezuela failed to break an impasse over their competition for a U.N. Security Council seat yesterday, with each side blaming the other for the stalemate. After a closed-door meeting, the two nations' foreign ministers said neither country had agreed to withdraw in favor of a consensus candidate, despite indications earlier in the week that they might do so. "We are not prepared to step down," Guatemalan Ambassador Gert Rosenthal said after the talks.
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