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Guardianship

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By Cynthia Kammann and Cynthia Kammann,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 1998
I ATTENDED a presentation about guardianship this week, assuming it had something to do with elderly people being adopted by their families.I was, of course, way off, and learned a lot from Wanda Nason-Raleigh, guardianship director for the county's Department of Aging, who introduced the topic to 36 senior citizens at the Brooklyn Park Senior Nutrition Site.Brooklyn Park resident Joseph Siemer acknowledged that, like me, he hadn't thought much about guardianship before the presentation."It's good to let people know because a lot of them are in the dark and it's good to know your options," he said.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
The Anne Arundel County government is looking for a licensed physician to serve on the county's Adult Public Guardianship Review Board. Members of the board provide oversight of the care provided for adults who are under public guardianship. They review the health of people under public guardianship and make recommendations whether the guardianship should continue or not. Public guardians are appointed for people who are older than 65 who are unable to care for themselves and to make decisions about their well-being.
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NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | January 31, 1995
A former legal secretary accepted a plea agreement in Howard Circuit Court yesterday admitting that she stole about $134,000 from accounts overseen by two Ellicott City lawyers for whom she worked between 1988 and 1993.Daren Lynne Flather, 42, of the 10300 block of Globe Court in Ellicott City, pleaded guilty to three counts of theft for taking the money from five guardianship accounts by forging the names of the lawyers. She had been charged with 32 counts of theft, forgery and cashing forged checks.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2010
Six years after pleading guilty in the torture death of a teenage girl, Satrina Roberts is asking for a new trial, claiming her attorney gave her bad advice and that her plea was involuntary. Roberts was sentenced to two consecutive 20-year prison terms in 2004 for murder and child abuse. A hearing on her petition for "post-conviction relief" was scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, but it has since been postponed. Court papers say Roberts didn't understand the elements of her offenses, both because she had a clean criminal record and therefore "lacked familiarity with the terminology used in the courts" and because she "had a long history of mental health issues," along with an IQ of 56. Roberts was awarded legal guardianship of Ciara Jobes, who lived with her since 1998 because her own mother was dying of AIDS.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1995
School started for Derek Roll yesterday, and he had one word to describe his new classes."Fun," he said at the end of the day. "Much better than staying home and watching TV."The 13-year-old returned to school seven weeks later than classmates and is eager to make up for lost time."He was all smiles when the principal met him at the door," said Dawn Roberts, Derek's aunt.Donald Pyles, principal at Sykesville Middle School, said he wanted to welcome Derek with open arms."Whatever the reasons were for not being here, he had to be unhappy out of school," said Mr. Pyles.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | May 15, 1991
A federal judge in Baltimore has issued a preliminary injunction to bar removal of a brain-damaged Army veteran from the Veterans Administration Medical Center at Fort Howard pending a possible state court decision on who should be the man's legal guardian.Judge Marvin J. Garbis said yesterday, at the end of an hour-long hearing in U.S. District Court, that he has "serious questions" about the validity of legal guardianships in Maryland and Florida claimed by Deanna V. Mack, the man's wife.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2010
Six years after pleading guilty in the torture death of a teenage girl, Satrina Roberts is asking for a new trial, claiming her attorney gave her bad advice and that her plea was involuntary. Roberts was sentenced to two consecutive 20-year prison terms in 2004 for murder and child abuse. A hearing on her petition for "post-conviction relief" was scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, but it has since been postponed. Court papers say Roberts didn't understand the elements of her offenses, both because she had a clean criminal record and therefore "lacked familiarity with the terminology used in the courts" and because she "had a long history of mental health issues," along with an IQ of 56. Roberts was awarded legal guardianship of Ciara Jobes, who lived with her since 1998 because her own mother was dying of AIDS.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
Two-and-a-half years after 15-year-old Ciara Jobes was found beaten and starved to death on the kitchen floor of her guardian's East Baltimore home, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. signed into law yesterday a sweeping reform of Maryland's approach to legal guardianship. State Sen. Lisa A. Gladden, a former child lawyer and Baltimore Democrat who sponsored the legislation, brought along an oversized photograph of Ciara to the bill signing. "Ciara is smiling down from heaven today," Gladden said.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2004
In response to the torture death of Ciara Jobes, a 15-year-old Baltimore girl who was allegedly killed by her mentally ill guardian, state legislators are introducing a bill this week that aims to regulate who can be awarded permanent custody of abused and neglected children. The legislation comes after public outcry over Ciara's death, which led city and state politicians to demand answers from state welfare workers. Senate Bill 693 targets a loophole in Maryland's guardianship process, which has little or no oversight.
NEWS
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | July 3, 1991
The wife of a comatose Army veteran lost her fight yesterday to remain his legal guardian and move him to Florida, where she is seeking court approval to end his life.Baltimore County Circuit Judge John F. Fader II said yesterday that he will decide in about eight weeks whether former Army private Ronald W. Mack should be allowed to die. In the meantime, he replaced Deanna V. Mack, 28, as her husband's legal guardian with Edward J. Gilliss, the lawyer appointed by the court to represent Mr. Mack.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | March 6, 2007
Council may give nominees more scrutiny Usually, an appointment to a volunteer panel like the Adult Public Guardianship Review Board would sail right through the Baltimore County Council. Fledia Powell's nomination was on the agenda for last night's council meeting - until, that is, her pending criminal trial came to light. Powell, who works in the county's Office of Workforce Development, is charged with first-degree assault, accused of aiming a shotgun out of a Towson-area home at a man standing on a corner.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2006
Family members of Samira Salmassi lost a custody battle yesterday in Howard County Circuit Court over the Ellicott City woman who has been in a vegetative state since her ex-husband choked her last year. Judge Dennis M. Sweeney ruled that members of the family, who live in Ohio, were too far away to be responsible for the immediate decisions that might be needed for Salmassi's care at a Baltimore rehabilitation hospital. Salmassi, 40, will remain in the custody of the state Department of Social Services.
NEWS
July 4, 2006
From Philadelphia to Gettysburg is about 140 miles - and of course 87 years. Gettysburg gave shape to the nation that had emerged in the summer heat at Independence Hall in 1776, and though it's an interesting coincidence that the greatest battle in the long struggle to define an American identity drew to a climax on the day before Independence Day in 1863, it was only in November of that year that the deeper significance of that event was cast. On a crisp autumn afternoon, Abraham Lincoln, who had sworn to uphold the Constitution, drew upon the radical promise of the Declaration of Independence to justify his cause and inspire his nation.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2005
Two-and-a-half years after 15-year-old Ciara Jobes was found beaten and starved to death on the kitchen floor of her guardian's East Baltimore home, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. signed into law yesterday a sweeping reform of Maryland's approach to legal guardianship. State Sen. Lisa A. Gladden, a former child lawyer and Baltimore Democrat who sponsored the legislation, brought along an oversized photograph of Ciara to the bill signing. "Ciara is smiling down from heaven today," Gladden said.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
Rejecting a defense argument that city judges and social workers "aided and abetted" the horrific child-abuse death of 15- year-old Ciara Jobes, a city Circuit Court judge sentenced the girl's caretaker yesterday to 40 years in prison. Judge Kaye A. Allison recommended that Satrina Roberts serve her sentence at Patuxent Institution, a correctional facility with mental health services. Roberts, 33, sat with her head bowed throughout most of the hearing, as the prosecutor and her lawyer recounted in graphic detail the circumstances of Ciara's death in December 2002 and the story of how the girl came to be under the legal guardianship of Roberts.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 1, 2004
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. announced appointments last week to the newly created Commission on Minority and Women Business Enterprise, part of his effort to diversify the pool of businesses that contract with the county. The commission, which is made up of 15 county residents, was established to advise the county government on the needs of minorities and to help counter racial discrimination or prejudice. It also will make recommendations to ensure equal rights and opportunities for minorities in business, according to a news release from the county.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2004
Inside a three-bed room at a nursing home in Sykesville, an elderly woman lies alone, a crisp, white sheet covering her frail body, revealing only the 77-year-old's thin face. Sedated with morphine, the woman sleeps deeply, a tube running from her nose to an oxygen machine beside the bed. Outside at the nurses' station, Gail Jones consults with an attending nurse before entering the woman's room. She leans over the bed, kisses the woman's forehead and strokes her fine, gray hair. "I just want you to be comfortable," Jones whispers to the woman who is at the end stage of Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2006
Family members of Samira Salmassi lost a custody battle yesterday in Howard County Circuit Court over the Ellicott City woman who has been in a vegetative state since her ex-husband choked her last year. Judge Dennis M. Sweeney ruled that members of the family, who live in Ohio, were too far away to be responsible for the immediate decisions that might be needed for Salmassi's care at a Baltimore rehabilitation hospital. Salmassi, 40, will remain in the custody of the state Department of Social Services.
NEWS
April 22, 2004
MARYLAND'S CUSTODIAN of children in crisis was wise to quickly step in after a much-needed bill to regulate guardianship failed in the General Assembly. The Department of Human Resources says it will rewrite regulations covering children in its care to require screening of prospective permanent guardians, be they family or friends. The background checks, expected to be much like those in place for prospective foster care parents, will greatly help judges deciding these most important placements.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2004
Maryland social service officials said yesterday that they would reform the agency's largely unregulated process for appointing guardians of abused and neglected children - despite the failure this week of a bill in the General Assembly that would have forced them to make such changes. The legislation - which would have required the Department of Human Resources to perform a thorough screening of any home where an abused child might be sent to live with a guardian - died in a House committee without coming up for a vote.
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