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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 25, 2006
GUANTANAMO BAY NAVY BASE, Cuba -- Fourteen more captives were sent home to Saudi Arabia from this detention center, the Department of Defense announced yesterday. "The department expects that there will continue to be other transfers or releases of detainees," the Pentagon said, estimating the prison camps' population as of yesterday at "about 450 detainees." The transfer was also the first since three Arab captives were found hanging in their cells two weeks ago in what the military described as the first detainee deaths at this four-year-old detention and interrogation center.
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NEWS
July 18, 2014
As an American citizen who served three years in the U.S. Army as a soldier and worked for the Army for 30 years as a civilian, I am appalled at the violation of human rights that our facility at Guantanamo Bay represents ( "Detainees are human," July 16). Capturing people overseas and then holding them for a dozen years or more without trial or specific charges grossly violates the moral principles upon which our nation was founded. Though some prisoners there represent a real threat if released, our so-called war on terror is an open-ended situation that shows no signs of ending any time soon.
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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
Alfredo Perez is glad to be in Baltimore, but the water-stained picture of him kneeling beside his little daughter is a constant reminder of why he's not happy yet.The picture was damaged when he set out on a flimsy raft from his native Cuba to escape the government of Fidel Castro. He held tightly to the photo when he was picked up by the Coast Guard and taken to the Guantanamo Bay refugee camp.Even now, eight months later, he becomes emotional when he talks about his 5-year-old Sheila, who remained behind with his wife in Cuba.
NEWS
By Emad Hassan | July 15, 2014
I have been locked up at Guantanamo Bay for 12 years, held without charge or trial. I've done nothing wrong; in 2009, I was unanimously cleared for release by six different branches of the U.S. government, including the FBI and the CIA. Yet here I am, still detained. I write this 106 years after the birth of Thurgood Marshall, a Baltimore-born civil rights lawyer and later a Supreme Court justice who helped end segregation in America. Marshall understood and respected the humanity and innate equality of all people.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 14, 2004
In their first decisions, military tribunals considering the status of the people held at the United States naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, ruled yesterday that four detainees had properly been designated as enemy combatants who may be held there indefinitely. The tribunals, which opened for business on July 30 and which resemble courts only in broad outline, will ultimately consider the status of all of the nearly 600 people held at Guantanamo. Their rulings yesterday were more surprising for their speed than their substance.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 30, 2005
WASHINGTON -- In the past few months, the small commercial air service to the naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has been carrying people military authorities had hoped would never be allowed there -- American lawyers. And they have been arriving in increasing numbers, providing more than a third of about 530 remaining detainees with representation in federal court. Despite considerable obstacles and expenses, other lawyers are eagerly lining up to challenge the government's detention of people the military has called enemy combatants and possible terrorists.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 23, 2005
MIAMI - Ten months after the fact, the Pentagon disclosed yesterday the death of a Navy doctor at the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Pentagon spokesmen would not explain the circumstances surrounding the death of Cmdr. Adrian Basil Szwec, 43, of Chicago, a 19-year career naval medical officer who died at the base April 12. An announcement described Szwec's death only as "a noncombat related incident." Szwec's death was still under investigation by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, a Navy spokeswoman said at the Pentagon, declining to be identified.
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | June 20, 2006
WASHINGTON -- President Bush travels to Austria today hoping to spotlight the improved relations with Europe that have marked his second term, but a strong undercurrent of international outrage about the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay is threatening to mar the atmosphere. The president's efforts to work with the Europeans on Iran, particularly his recent agreement to participate in direct negotiations with Tehran if it suspends uranium enrichment, exemplify a more collaborative foreign policy.
NEWS
By Emad Hassan | July 15, 2014
I have been locked up at Guantanamo Bay for 12 years, held without charge or trial. I've done nothing wrong; in 2009, I was unanimously cleared for release by six different branches of the U.S. government, including the FBI and the CIA. Yet here I am, still detained. I write this 106 years after the birth of Thurgood Marshall, a Baltimore-born civil rights lawyer and later a Supreme Court justice who helped end segregation in America. Marshall understood and respected the humanity and innate equality of all people.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 3, 2007
SYDNEY, Australia -- The decision by the U.S. military to charge an Australian citizen with one terrorism-related offense comes as Prime Minister John Howard is under mounting pressure, even from conservatives in his own party, to have the man charged, tried and brought home. The man, David Hicks, is the first detainee from the American base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to be charged under the Military Commissions Act of 2006. But the single charge, of providing "material support for terrorism," after Hicks has been held for five years in Guantanamo, has been met with skepticism, disbelief and some anger here, from conservatives and liberals alike.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons, Michael A. Memoli and David S. Cloud, Tribune Newspapers | June 4, 2014
The release of America's only prisoner of war in Afghanistan in a trade for five senior Taliban commanders from U.S. custody took only minutes Saturday. But it followed 31/2 years of secret on-and-off negotiations that produced far less than the White House had hoped. The idea of swapping prisoners emerged in early 2011, administration and congressional officials said Tuesday, when U.S. officials still sought to convince Taliban political leaders to come to the negotiating table to end the grinding war in Afghanistan.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Nearly 10 years ago, I reacted with horror and disdain as President George W. Bush gleefully took credit for extra-judicial killings and indefinite detention of suspected terrorists. I thought: "How could a president throw away the basic principle of trial by jury and shred our Constitution?" I agreed with those who saw the detention center at Guantanamo Bay as a terrible stain on our national values and called for its closure. As a supporter of the Green Party, I did not vote for President Obama in 2008.
NEWS
May 5, 2013
The hunger strike by inmates protesting conditions at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility in Cuba is forcing the Obama administration to revisit its policy of indefinite detention without trial for terrorist suspects. It's about time. As Mr. Obama noted Tuesday, the current policy is legally and morally unsustainable, and continuing it damages America's standing around the world without making the country any safer. The president needs to finally make good on his 2009 pledge to close Guantanamo, repatriate low-risk detainees to prisons in their home countries and bring the rest to the U.S. for trial.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 4, 2013
As a teenager in the mid-1990s, he moved with his parents to the United States from Pakistan. The family sought and received political asylum. They settled in Baltimore County and operated a gas station. The boy attended Owings Mills High School. His cricket skills helped him excel at baseball, the quintessential American game. "He always seemed like such a nice young man," said the chair of the English department. The nice young man graduated in 1999. He picked up a job as a data administrator with the Maryland Office of Planning.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | October 28, 2012
Four years ago, a telegenic, charismatic senator from Illinois cobbled together a New Deal coalition of labor, environmentalists, progressives, African-Americans and young people to capture the presidency. It was an exciting time. America had elected its first mixed-race president. Another glass ceiling had been broken. Even those of us who opposed his policies recognized that the election of Barack Obama conveyed a positive message about America to the world. In D.C., a jubilant media speculated about a "post-partisan" Capitol Hill.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
Before self-proclaimed 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was brought into court Saturday, Carole Reuben of Potomac said his arraignment would mark "the beginning of the end of the process. " Her son, Todd Hayes Reuben, was a passenger on American Airlines Flight 77, the airliner that was hijacked by five al-Qaida operatives and flown into the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001. The Potomac man was 40. But any hope that the arraignments of Mohammed and four alleged co-conspirators might bring some healing to family members, a decade after they lost loved ones in the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, was stymied Saturday by a halting proceeding in which the defendants refused to participate.
NEWS
By John Riley and John Riley,NEWSDAY | May 26, 2005
Amnesty International called the U.S. military's prison at Guantanamo Bay the "gulag of our times" yesterday and warned that American leaders might face international prosecution for mistreating prisoners. "When the most powerful country in the world thumbs its nose at the rule of law and human rights, it grants a license to others to commit abuse with impunity and audacity," Amnesty Secretary-General Irene Khan said at a London news conference releasing the group's annual report on global human rights, a blistering, 308-page survey.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 20, 2005
A combination of isolation, despair and humiliation has driven a Bahraini captive to attempt suicide at least nine times - one as recently as Monday - at the U.S. interrogation center for terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, his lawyer said Friday. Jumah Dossari, 32, tried to yank stitches out of his arm from a suicide attempt last month, according to U.S. military affidavits filed in federal court. The military defends its treatment of Dossari and says it has provided him with a variety of amusements, including a screening of the Oscar-winning movie Gladiator and permission to chat with fellow prisoners while recovering in a hospital bed. The Dossari case is the latest effort by civilian attorneys to get federal judges to address Guantanamo conditions by seeking injunctions in some of the 300-plus habeas corpus petitions filed in Washington.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
Members of the public may watch the arraignment of self-proclaimed 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other terror suspects Saturday at Fort Meade, a Pentagon spokesman said Monday. Mohammed and his co-defendants are to be arraigned at Guantanamo Bay on charges of terrorism and murder in the attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people in the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and United Airlines Flight 193. Fort Meade is one of four military bases scheduled to receive a secure, closed-circuit television feed of the proceedings, Lt. Col. Todd Breasseale said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
A studious young man with an aptitude for computers, Majid Shoukat Khan was working as a database administrator in a high-rise office building in Tysons Corner, Va., on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001. After American Airlines Flight 77 slammed into the western face of the Pentagon, the recent Owings Mill High School graduate watched from his office window as the smoke rose over the capital. Osama bin Laden would claim credit for the attacks. Khalid Sheikh Mohammad would boast of planning them.
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