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By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | March 31, 1992
BEIJING -- Two months ago, China's senior leader, Deng Xiaoping, kicked off a public drive for greater economic reform with a trip to Guangdong province in the south. Yesterday, news of his trip finally made it into major state-controlled media here.The reports by China's official news agency, its national television news and two Beijing-based newspapers carried no new information. But their appearance suggests Mr. Deng has at least partly triumphed over conservative opponents who control Beijing's propaganda mill.
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NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Tyler Marshall and Mark Magnier and Tyler Marshall,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 6, 2004
BEIJING - The World Health Organization confirmed yesterday that a 32-year-old television producer from southern China's Guangdong province is the first known SARS case among the public since the disease was contained in July. Two recent cases in Singapore and Taiwan were linked to researchers reportedly exposed in their labs. The WHO announcement, which followed a report of the case earlier in the day by China's Health Ministry, came after exhaustive tests on the unnamed patient, the people he came in contact with and his immediate environment, including where he slept, ate, walked and what kind of rats inhabited his housing block.
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NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Tyler Marshall and Mark Magnier and Tyler Marshall,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 6, 2004
BEIJING - The World Health Organization confirmed yesterday that a 32-year-old television producer from southern China's Guangdong province is the first known SARS case among the public since the disease was contained in July. Two recent cases in Singapore and Taiwan were linked to researchers reportedly exposed in their labs. The WHO announcement, which followed a report of the case earlier in the day by China's Health Ministry, came after exhaustive tests on the unnamed patient, the people he came in contact with and his immediate environment, including where he slept, ate, walked and what kind of rats inhabited his housing block.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2003
BEIJING - Among the 74 new cases of SARS reported yesterday in China are 47 in the interior province of Shanxi, raising the specter of a new cluster of infections far from the initial outbreak in southern Guangdong. The World Health Organization expressed concern, saying the health care system in poorer provinces such as Shanxi, which is in China's declining coal-mining belt, may be ill equipped to deal with the disease. Also yesterday, departing from earlier assurances that the illness was under control, Premier Wen Jiabao was quoted in newspapers calling the SARS outbreak "grave."
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2003
BEIJING - Breaking their long silence about the outbreak of the respiratory virus known as SARS, Chinese health officials insisted yesterday that they were taking the problem seriously and that the suspected virus was on the decline in China, home to more than half the world's known cases. "We are very confident about keeping this disease under control," the minister of health, Zhang Wenkang, said in a rare interview on the nightly news show of state-run television. Zhang described the flu-like symptoms of the disease and urged the public not to make "close contact" with infected patients - the ministry's broadest public health warning since the first cases were identified in southern China in November.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 15, 2003
BEIJING - Among the 74 new cases of SARS reported yesterday in China are 47 in the interior province of Shanxi, raising the specter of a new cluster of infections far from the initial outbreak in southern Guangdong. The World Health Organization expressed concern, saying the health care system in poorer provinces such as Shanxi, which is in China's declining coal-mining belt, may be ill equipped to deal with the disease. Also yesterday, departing from earlier assurances that the illness was under control, Premier Wen Jiabao was quoted in newspapers calling the SARS outbreak "grave."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2003
BEIJING - A team of World Health Organization investigators made its first visit to a Beijing hospital yesterday, hoping to clear up a swirl of questions and rumors about the prevalence in this city of a dangerous new respiratory disease. The Chinese government agreed late last week to the outside monitoring of Beijing's medical facilities after international experts complained about officials dragging their feet, some local doctors said the caseload was higher than officially reported, and tourist and business visits to the capital began to dry up. As of Thursday, according to the last public report by authorities here, Beijing had recorded only 22 cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome, including four deaths.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 17, 2003
Chinese health officials gave the World Health Organization the first sketchy details yesterday about a mysterious respiratory ailment that is believed to have first broken out in Guangdong province in November and that Chinese officials say has tapered off in recent weeks. It was the first official communication from China about the outbreak, and it provides a longer-term view to the WHO of how the illness, cases of which are now being reported throughout East Asia and in Canada, has behaved since the first cases were detected.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
Mmmmm, cake. A monkey nibbles on a moon cake made of fruit at a zoo in Shenzhen, Guangdong province of China. Moon cake is traditional food for Chinese people during the Mid-Autumn Festival, which fell on September 12 this year.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Staff Writer | March 8, 1992
CANTON, China -- At the South Coast Seafood Restaurant, Chinese dwarfs and Nepalese Gurkhas serve as doormen. Pretty young women draped in furs make a show of leading guests to their tables.Inside the mirrored hall, every table is packed with Hong Kong, Taiwanese and local entrepreneurs, downing imported liquor and mounds of seafood, and cutting deals over their ubiquitous portable phones.This is China in the 1990s -- specifically Guangdong Province, the heart of what now is hailed as the nation's "Gold Coast."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2003
BEIJING - A team of World Health Organization investigators made its first visit to a Beijing hospital yesterday, hoping to clear up a swirl of questions and rumors about the prevalence in this city of a dangerous new respiratory disease. The Chinese government agreed late last week to the outside monitoring of Beijing's medical facilities after international experts complained about officials dragging their feet, some local doctors said the caseload was higher than officially reported, and tourist and business visits to the capital began to dry up. As of Thursday, according to the last public report by authorities here, Beijing had recorded only 22 cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome, including four deaths.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2003
BEIJING - Breaking their long silence about the outbreak of the respiratory virus known as SARS, Chinese health officials insisted yesterday that they were taking the problem seriously and that the suspected virus was on the decline in China, home to more than half the world's known cases. "We are very confident about keeping this disease under control," the minister of health, Zhang Wenkang, said in a rare interview on the nightly news show of state-run television. Zhang described the flu-like symptoms of the disease and urged the public not to make "close contact" with infected patients - the ministry's broadest public health warning since the first cases were identified in southern China in November.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 17, 2003
Chinese health officials gave the World Health Organization the first sketchy details yesterday about a mysterious respiratory ailment that is believed to have first broken out in Guangdong province in November and that Chinese officials say has tapered off in recent weeks. It was the first official communication from China about the outbreak, and it provides a longer-term view to the WHO of how the illness, cases of which are now being reported throughout East Asia and in Canada, has behaved since the first cases were detected.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | March 31, 1992
BEIJING -- Two months ago, China's senior leader, Deng Xiaoping, kicked off a public drive for greater economic reform with a trip to Guangdong province in the south. Yesterday, news of his trip finally made it into major state-controlled media here.The reports by China's official news agency, its national television news and two Beijing-based newspapers carried no new information. But their appearance suggests Mr. Deng has at least partly triumphed over conservative opponents who control Beijing's propaganda mill.
NEWS
By Jennifer Lin and Jennifer Lin,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1997
MACAU -- Macau is what Hong Kong is not.Hong Kong is fast, modern and brash, a world-class commercial center, blessed with one of the best deep-water ports in the world. Macau, a Portuguese-run enclave an hour away by ferry, got an airport only two years ago. It has just built its first skyscraper -- the 40-story headquarters for the Bank of China. Hong Kong makes its living off trade and international finance; Macau, from casinos and a tawdry nightlife.But the two places have one very significant thing in common.
NEWS
By ALAN WOOD | January 14, 1992
Bothell, Washington -- Sooner or later, the pressure in Congress to revoke most-favored-nation trade status for China will provoke another major confrontation with the Bush administration. That is unfortunate. The target of Congressional wrath will be the jailkeepers in Beijing, but the people who will actually be hit are the emerging capitalists in south China who are exporting to the U.S. market -- the very people we ought to be supporting.What they have accomplished, and how they have accomplished it, is a spectacular story.
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