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By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 26, 1993
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Veterans may soon help unravel a medical mystery that evolved a half-century ago and half a world away.The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs wants to know whether any soldiers or sailors developed neurological diseases after serving on Guam during the World War II era.If so, that may help explain a high incidence of Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, among the Chamarro natives of...
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
For years, scientists have suspected that the warm waters of the western Pacific Ocean play a key role in shaping the Earth's climate. But satellite data provided only a partial picture of what's happening in this remote region of the globe. Now, an international team of researchers, including several from Maryland, is engaged in an ambitious effort to quantify those natural processes, making dozens of flights in three aircraft from mid-January through February to track the gases and particles from the ocean as they rise into the upper atmosphere.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,WASHINGTON BUREAU | November 28, 1992
WASHINGTON - States that want to go far toward outlawin abortion by making it a crime in almost all situations are likely to find out soon - perhaps as early as Monday - whether the Supreme Court will permit that.This was an issue that abortion rights activists have felt sure the court had settled in its latest abortion ruling, last June 29, when it partly reaffirmed Roe vs. Wade even as it reduced the scope of the constitutional right to end pregnancies.But the court seems ready to demonstrate anew, however, that on abortion, nothing is simple and not much is yet settled for sure.
NEWS
By Gabrielle Russon and Gabrielle Russon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Donna Christensen, then new in Congress, was passionately opposed to the motion to impeach President Bill Clinton in December 1998. Whatever his mistakes, Christensen believed, Clinton did not deserve to be removed from office. But Christensen, who represents the Virgin Islands, could not vote. She was reduced to speaking on the House floor only after the impeachment vote and declared that if she could have, she would have voted no. "We're all generally forgotten or on the back burner," Christensen said recently, referring to herself and the four other nonvoting delegates in the House.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | April 17, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The law that goes the furthest to criminalize abortion failed yesterday when a federal appeals court struck it down as a violation of Roe vs. Wade.Just six days before the Supreme Court will hear pleas to overrule Roe, the basic 1973 abortion decision, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco nullified a 1990 law in the U.S. territory of Guam, declaring:"It would be both wrong and presumptuous of us now to declare that Roe vs. Wade is dead."The Circuit Court said that the Supreme Court, in deciding Roe, went through the process of balancing pregnant women's interests against some states' interest in protecting fetal life, "and came to a result that has affected the lives and rights of millions of people."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In the wake of the Supreme Court's refusa to hear the Guam case, the operative question now is whether abortion rights will continue to be an important issue in national -- politics -- or one largely fought out in state capitals. Many politicians in Congress would not be unhappy to see the latter.The message in the court's ruling is that even after 12 years of Ronald Reagan and George Bush there simply isn't a majority on the court for overturning the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 22, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The government of the Pacific island of Guam said yesterday that it would appeal a federal court decision striking down a law that prohibits abortion in nearly all circumstances.The move set the stage for the U.S. Supreme Court to reconsider -- perhaps as early as next year -- Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision that established a constitutional right to abortion.Although the Guam government had suggested earlier that it might not pursue the case, Gov. Joseph F. Ada said he had decided "after tremendous soul-searching" to appeal the ruling to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 1998
HONOLULU -- Korean Air conceded yesterday that the cockpit crew of its Flight 801 apparently ignored important procedures as the jetliner sank dangerously low before slamming into a hill last summer while attempting to land in Guam.Pilot error is the suspected cause of the crash Aug. 6 that killed 228 of the 254 aboard the Boeing 747, and yesterday's testimony by Jung Taek Lee, the airline's chief of flight crew operations, did little to dispel that suspicion.Transcripts of cockpit voice recordings recovered from the wreckage show confusion in the cockpit, with crew members questioning one another repeatedly about the state of the instrument landing system and failing to follow procedures that would have kept them aware of how close they were getting to the ground.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | December 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The nation's toughest anti-abortion law collapsed yesterday as the Supreme Court sent a clear message that states should not try to make abortion a crime.The court refused to take any action to save the territory of Guam's nearly total ban on abortion, a criminal law that goes further to forbid abortions than any U.S. law on the books.Although three justices who believe there should be no constitutional right to abortion voted to consider Guam's appeal, it takes the votes of four justices to grant review of any case.
FEATURES
By Edward Dufner and Edward Dufner,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | January 21, 1996
Seldom have so many traveled so far to see so much.In the vast reaches of the western Pacific, Madison Avenue and Hollywood have collided with a tropical paradise and nearly 500 years of colonial history.The result looks like Main Street, U.S.A. -- but with shimmering turquoise lagoons, stunning cliffs and luxuriant jungles.And like Hawaii -- with Spanish architecture.And like a living museum of Americans' World War II valor -- with sidewalks full of Japanese tourists."If you're looking for something different, if you're looking for something unspoiled, if you're a person who really wants to get away from it all it's oh, so nice to get off that fast track every so often to go someplace that beautiful," says Sandra Palmer, spokeswoman for the Guam Liaison Office in Washington.
NEWS
By [LIZ ATWOOD] | September 2, 2007
Fred Nelson is beginning his sixth season portraying King Henry VIII in the imaginary village of Revel Grove at the Maryland Renaissance Festival. The festival runs weekends through Oct. 21 in Crownsville. Outside of Revel Grove, Nelson has acted in several other venues, most recently in the title role of The Nerd at Baltimore's Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre. He is a Glen Burnie-based video editor and voiceover announcer for several national TV networks and corporate clients. His PBS documentary 9 to 5 No Longer airs nationally this fall.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2005
SAIPAN, Northern Mariana Islands - By jogging at sunset on the white sands of a palm-fringed beach here, 17-year-old Audrey O. Bricia is doing more than toning up for her next try in this island's Miss Philippines contest. She is getting in shape for U.S. Army boot camp. To gain an edge on the competition for enlistment, she reserved a seat two days in advance to take the Army's aptitude test on a recent Saturday morning. Safely ensconced in her seat, she watched an Army recruiter turn away 10 latecomers, all recent high school graduates.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 2003
WASHINGTON -- Federal officials said yesterday that a recall of beef products linked to a dairy cow infected with mad cow disease now extends to eight states and Guam, as meat associated with the diseased animal was distributed more widely than investigators first believed. Agriculture officials said the likelihood that the beef is tainted is slim, because all of the tissues known to be affected by bovine spongiform encephalopathy -- that from the brain, spinal cord and a part of the intestine -- were removed before the carcass was processed.
NEWS
By Carol Cruzan Morton and Carol Cruzan Morton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 29, 2003
More than 50 years ago, U.S. Navy physicians stationed on the West Pacific island of Guam found a shocking number of people with a mysterious fatal brain disease. The symptoms - gradual paralysis, sometimes with the tremors of Parkinson's and the dementia of Alzheimer's - looked like several diseases of old age. But this ailment struck people as young as 18. Doctors eventually named the syndrome amyotrophic lateral sclerosis / parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC). Locals call it lytico-bodig.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 6, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - South Korean officials said yesterday that they were reassured by U.S. pledges not to stage a surprise attack against North Korea, amid conflicting signs of American intentions and rising fears that the nuclear crisis might devastate the prospering Korean economy. The unification minister, Jeong Se-hyun, told Koreans that the United States "would never launch a pre-emptive strike without consulting South Korea" after two dozen heavy American bombers were ordered to the U.S. territory of Guam to buttress defenses against the North.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - The photograph of the execution - the one where two doomed men kneel by graves they dug themselves in a desolate field on Guam moments before their captors behead them - was one of the first things visitors used to see when they entered the reception area of Robert A. Underwood's Capitol Hill office. Now the yellowed print lies in the basement of a House building, boxed up with Underwood's other possessions, as Guam's lone nonvoting delegate prepares to vacate his congressional seat.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - The photograph of the execution - the one where two doomed men kneel by graves they dug themselves in a desolate field on Guam moments before their captors behead them - was one of the first things visitors used to see when they entered the reception area of Robert A. Underwood's Capitol Hill office. Now the yellowed print lies in the basement of a House building, boxed up with Underwood's other possessions, as Guam's lone nonvoting delegate prepares to vacate his congressional seat.
NEWS
By Carol Cruzan Morton and Carol Cruzan Morton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 29, 2003
More than 50 years ago, U.S. Navy physicians stationed on the West Pacific island of Guam found a shocking number of people with a mysterious fatal brain disease. The symptoms - gradual paralysis, sometimes with the tremors of Parkinson's and the dementia of Alzheimer's - looked like several diseases of old age. But this ailment struck people as young as 18. Doctors eventually named the syndrome amyotrophic lateral sclerosis / parkinsonism-dementia complex (ALS-PDC). Locals call it lytico-bodig.
NEWS
July 25, 2002
Taneytown Economic Development Commission will hold its monthly business breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Aug. 2 at Thunderhead Bowling Centre at Routes 140 and 832. Roz Trieber from Humor and Health Associates will discuss "Jest4Success." The cost for breakfast is $5.50, payable at the meeting. Reservations are required by Wednesday at 410-751-1100. Valley Lions Club installs new officers Valley Lions Club of Pleasant Valley recently installed new officers for 2002-2003. Past District Gov. Andrew J. DeMario, Sr. installed the new officers: George Butler, president; Dave McDonald, first vice president; Ray Jones, second vice president; Bob Humbert, secretary; Eugene Brewer, treasurer; Jim Handley, tail twister; Jim Swartzbaugh, lion tamer; Dick Hosfield and Bobbie Davis, one-year directors; Tom Kinser and Chris Conover, two-year directors; Roy Davis, immediate past president and membership chairman.
NEWS
By FRANK LANGFITT and FRANK LANGFITT,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 12, 2001
BEIJING - A chartered U.S. airliner took off from Hainan island early today, carrying 24 crew members of a downed U.S. spy plane to freedom and ending an 11-day standoff with China after Washington said it was "very sorry" but didn't apologize, as Beijing had demanded. Given the political stakes and Beijing's earlier insistence on an apology for a collision between a Chinese fighter jet and an American spy plane, yesterday's agreement seemed a sobering outcome to an episode marked by high tension and harsh words.
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