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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 23, 1991
WEST GREENWICH, R.I. -- At GTECH, the world's leading maker of computerized lottery machines, winning numbers hit almost every day.Operating profits are up by $83.2 million this year -- 90 percent beyond the previous year. In January, the company had 46 national, state and provincial lottery contracts. Today, 51 governments buy lottery computers from GTECH.Leaving little to chance, the company has moved to the top of the lottery industry in a nanosecond of commercial time. Sixty-four percent of lottery terminals anywhere on the globe were made by this company, which was started in the mid-1980s.
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NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1995
The Maryland lottery urged yesterday that top state officials award the agency's computer contract to Automated Wagering International, a deal that could save taxpayers almost $53 million over the next five years.Lottery Director Lloyd W. Jones said his agency has concluded that the Atlanta based firm has the technical and financial ability to run the state's $1.1 billion-a-year lottery operation. "AWI can do everything that it said it could," he said.Lottery officials spent five weeks investigating AWI's operations in other states, its corporate finances and its proposal for Maryland.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | June 9, 1996
A WHIFF OF scandal, a hint of mystery. It must be lottery time. Depending on which side you believe, Maryland's new contract to run the daily lottery games is either on the verge of becoming a debacle or the losing bidder is trying to stir up trouble.Much is riding on this $43 million contract. Given that Maryland reaps $410 million a year from its lottery activities, a botched transition would cost taxpayers dearly. The new operator, too, stands to suffer mightily if there is a foul-up. Automated Wagering International is now the Avis of the lottery-gaming world, but if its Maryland venture flops, the company may never recover.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | July 16, 1991
A company created expressly to handle the lucrative printing business of the Maryland lottery should not be given preferential status as a minority enterprise because the firm has virtually no employees, no equipment and no experience to handle the job, a state review panel has concluded.WBS Inc., a Baltimore-based company associated with William L. "Little Willie" Adams, a political ally of Gov. William Donald Schaefer and a one-time numbers kingpin, is included in the list of minority subcontractors that helped lottery giant GTECH Corp.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | December 6, 1992
It's the mother of all payoffs; the largest of wins; the biggest lottery jackpot ever in Maryland.The winner? GTECH of Rhode Island. Thanks to a friendly governor, a friendly budget director and influential lobbyists, GTECH has parlayed a loss-leader computer contract with the Maryland Lottery Agency into a monster pay day.We're talking megabucks. GTECH is being paid an extra $49.2 million for computers and software to operate an electronic keno game in Maryland. When the original $64.6 million deal was signed in 1991, after a bitter brawl with Control Data Corp.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | June 1, 1991
When is enough enough? It is difficult to understand the public reaction to the news that William L. Adams has a piece of a printing subcontract let by the successful bidder to provide computer services for the state Lottery Agency. Going back over the record of Mr. Adams' dealings with the law -- as ''Little Willie'' Adams, bar owner and reported illegal lottery operator -- doesn't help much.Here's the story, as old library clips tell it:In 1951, Mr. Adams testified before a U.S. Senate investigating panel headed by Estes Kefauver.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1995
Hunt Valley-based AmTote International is up for sale, its parent company said yesterday as it laid off 25 employees of the gambling equipment company as a prelude to a deal.GTech Holdings Corp., the world's largest provider of computerized lottery systems, said yesterday that officials were negotiating with "several parties" to sell AmTote less than two years after it was acquired for $20.7 million.The sale, officials said, will not affect AmTote's contractual commitments to lease betting ticket machines, infield tote boards and computer systems to pari-mutuel race tracks and off-track-betting parlors throughout the world, including Pimlico and Laurel race tracks in Maryland.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | June 23, 1991
With the same kinds of demographic and consumer information used by sellers of fast food and yuppie clothing, GTECH will assess Maryland's lottery participation -- ZIP code by ZIP code.Guy B. Snowden, co-chairman of GTECH, says the state's lottery business can grow without saturating the inner city of Baltimore, where many assume the lottery is played most heavily.GTECH says lotteries are played most actively by the middle class and lower middle class.Mr. Snowden said his company might eventually recommend expanding the number of terminals in Maryland beyond the 2,400 called for in its current contract.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | April 18, 1991
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun incorrectly attributed to the governor a statement by Marcel Helou, vice president of the Control Data Corp. Mr. Helou said of the Maryland State Lottery computer system proposed by GTech Corp., "We're looking here at an unproven, untested, undemonstrated system."ANNAPOLIS -- Despite a last-minute plea from the losing bidder, the Board of Public Works awarded a $64 million lottery computer contract yesterday to GTech Corp. of Providence, R.I.The five-year contract covers all the hardware, software, services and maintenance for the Maryland State Lottery Agency's machines.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1996
The beleaguered company that was scheduled to take over Maryland's lottery games next month told state officials yesterday it needs an extra 28 days to get ready.The request for a delay came after the company, Automated Wagering International Inc. -- which recently was fired by Arizona's lottery for poor performance -- delivered flawed software to Maryland this month, a state lottery official said.At a hastily called meeting in Annapolis, top state legislators greeted news of the request nervously and, in some cases, angrily.
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