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Gruyere

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NEWS
By Newsday | February 25, 2007
Any cuisine that includes bread also has traditional uses for leftover or stale bread. Bread puddings can be sweet or savory and served for breakfast, lunch or dinner. In this savory version, you can substitute other greens, such as spinach, or make a lower-calorie, lower-fat version with light shredded mild cheddar or mozzarella. COLLARD AND GRUYERE BREAD PUDDING Makes 8 servings 4 large eggs 3 cups skim milk 2 cups shredded Gruyere cheese 1 (16-ounce) bag frozen chopped kale or collard greens, thawed pinch nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon thyme 12 ounces crusty bread, cut into 2-inch pieces Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
You could, in a pinch, pick up a tub of generic onion dip from the refrigerated section at your local store before your next football gathering. Or, terrifyingly enough, even off the shelf in the chip aisle. But then you'd be missing out on this melty, rich, carmelized onion wonderfulness. Plus: bacon. Yes, this takes more time - especially carmelizing those onions, which always seems to take way longer than even the most truthful-sounding recipes claim. Wait it out until you get that telltale golden brown.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | January 19, 2003
Much to my surprise and his, my thirtysomething son has turned out to be a talented cook. In fact, when he and his wife entertain, it is usually Michael who plans and executes the menus. He loves having friends over and often organizes his social life around sporting events. A passionate football fan, he looks forward every year to the Super Bowl, when he invites a small group to his house to watch the game and to enjoy a homemade meal. Knowing that he keeps the menus for his bowl parties simple, I couldn't resist sending him a new sandwich recipe that I recently created.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | December 15, 2011
Thanksgiving may be all about food (and football), but Christmas has myriad elements besides the Roast Beast. Gift presentations and all that oohing and aahing, to be more precise. Growing up, we had a turkey dinner on both Thanksgiving and Christmas. I am not allowed to repeat that tradition. For Dec. 25, "they" want an entirely different menu, and usually something different every year. Serves me right. I created these monsters, albeit adorable ones. My mother used to call it being "hoisted on your own petard.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 26, 2000
When entertaining during this season, I try to plan what I call transitional meals. I blend hearty dishes redolent of winter with lighter ones. A good example of this type of menu is one I recently created. The main course will include orange-glazed roast pork tenderloin served with asparagus, plus a gratin of butternut squash with Gruyere cheese and rosemary. For the gratin, I saute chopped leeks and diced squash in a little butter and combine them in a baking pan. I add rosemary-scented cream to the dish and finally a topping of shredded Gruyere cheese.
NEWS
March 19, 2000
When selecting gourmet cheeses: For Brie, choose a round that feels supple but not mushy with rind that's slightly moist and evenly colored (white, cream or rust). Gruyere and Emmentaler should have a smooth, semifirm texture, easily sliced or grated. Stilton, like most other blue-veined varieties, should have a crumbly texture and pungent aroma. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2003
While walking through the produce section of a neighborhood market several days ago, I spotted a large display of Belgian endive. In season throughout the cold-weather months, the white and pale green bulbs were a bargain, so I picked up a bagful and tossed them into my cart. Typically I slice endive and add it to mixed-green salads for a slightly bitter accent. Or I mound the leaves with blue cheese and toasted walnuts and offer them as appetizers. This time I decided to cook the endive.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | December 15, 2011
Thanksgiving may be all about food (and football), but Christmas has myriad elements besides the Roast Beast. Gift presentations and all that oohing and aahing, to be more precise. Growing up, we had a turkey dinner on both Thanksgiving and Christmas. I am not allowed to repeat that tradition. For Dec. 25, "they" want an entirely different menu, and usually something different every year. Serves me right. I created these monsters, albeit adorable ones. My mother used to call it being "hoisted on your own petard.
NEWS
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | July 18, 1999
Walk into the foyer of Tersiguel's in Ellicott City, and you'll usually find owner Fernand Tersiguel looking over the reservation book, warmly greeting guests, and perhaps darting into the lounge to sneak a peek at a soccer game on television.This is his house, it's clear, an impression reinforced by the restaurant's location in a historic home on Main Street. And like a comfortable home, there is nothing fussy or deluxe about the decor at Tersiguel's. The fanciest touch is the pair of chandeliers in the entryway; the most charming is the stone planter with bright pink cosmos in the garden room in back.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
Cheese is among the most versatile of foods, which makes it great for entertaining, whether casual or formal. It works served quite simply, with French bread and a glass of wine or beer, or it can be made far more elegant and complex, such as drizzled with liqueur, topped with apricots, raisins, and pine nuts and lightly baked.We asked a couple of chefs, a purveyor and a cheese book author for some suggestions for serving cheese, and how to select cheeses and accompaniments for a cheese plate (country of origin and type of milk are indicated in brackets after cheese names)
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | June 11, 2008
Martha Nielson of Trenton, N.J., was hoping someone would have the recipe for a Crab Imperial dish similar to the one she and her husband used to enjoy on their trips to Maryland. It was served at Busch's restaurant in Cape St. Claire. The restaurant closed several years ago and though she has tried many recipes for Crab Imperial, none has come close to the light and fluffy one with a cheesy topping that was served at Busch's. Unfortunately, we did not receive any responses from our readers for a Crab Imperial with a cheese topping.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 25, 2007
Any cuisine that includes bread also has traditional uses for leftover or stale bread. Bread puddings can be sweet or savory and served for breakfast, lunch or dinner. In this savory version, you can substitute other greens, such as spinach, or make a lower-calorie, lower-fat version with light shredded mild cheddar or mozzarella. COLLARD AND GRUYERE BREAD PUDDING Makes 8 servings 4 large eggs 3 cups skim milk 2 cups shredded Gruyere cheese 1 (16-ounce) bag frozen chopped kale or collard greens, thawed pinch nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon thyme 12 ounces crusty bread, cut into 2-inch pieces Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2003
While walking through the produce section of a neighborhood market several days ago, I spotted a large display of Belgian endive. In season throughout the cold-weather months, the white and pale green bulbs were a bargain, so I picked up a bagful and tossed them into my cart. Typically I slice endive and add it to mixed-green salads for a slightly bitter accent. Or I mound the leaves with blue cheese and toasted walnuts and offer them as appetizers. This time I decided to cook the endive.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | January 19, 2003
Much to my surprise and his, my thirtysomething son has turned out to be a talented cook. In fact, when he and his wife entertain, it is usually Michael who plans and executes the menus. He loves having friends over and often organizes his social life around sporting events. A passionate football fan, he looks forward every year to the Super Bowl, when he invites a small group to his house to watch the game and to enjoy a homemade meal. Knowing that he keeps the menus for his bowl parties simple, I couldn't resist sending him a new sandwich recipe that I recently created.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 26, 2000
When entertaining during this season, I try to plan what I call transitional meals. I blend hearty dishes redolent of winter with lighter ones. A good example of this type of menu is one I recently created. The main course will include orange-glazed roast pork tenderloin served with asparagus, plus a gratin of butternut squash with Gruyere cheese and rosemary. For the gratin, I saute chopped leeks and diced squash in a little butter and combine them in a baking pan. I add rosemary-scented cream to the dish and finally a topping of shredded Gruyere cheese.
NEWS
March 19, 2000
When selecting gourmet cheeses: For Brie, choose a round that feels supple but not mushy with rind that's slightly moist and evenly colored (white, cream or rust). Gruyere and Emmentaler should have a smooth, semifirm texture, easily sliced or grated. Stilton, like most other blue-veined varieties, should have a crumbly texture and pungent aroma. -- Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | June 11, 2008
Martha Nielson of Trenton, N.J., was hoping someone would have the recipe for a Crab Imperial dish similar to the one she and her husband used to enjoy on their trips to Maryland. It was served at Busch's restaurant in Cape St. Claire. The restaurant closed several years ago and though she has tried many recipes for Crab Imperial, none has come close to the light and fluffy one with a cheesy topping that was served at Busch's. Unfortunately, we did not receive any responses from our readers for a Crab Imperial with a cheese topping.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
You could, in a pinch, pick up a tub of generic onion dip from the refrigerated section at your local store before your next football gathering. Or, terrifyingly enough, even off the shelf in the chip aisle. But then you'd be missing out on this melty, rich, carmelized onion wonderfulness. Plus: bacon. Yes, this takes more time - especially carmelizing those onions, which always seems to take way longer than even the most truthful-sounding recipes claim. Wait it out until you get that telltale golden brown.
NEWS
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | July 18, 1999
Walk into the foyer of Tersiguel's in Ellicott City, and you'll usually find owner Fernand Tersiguel looking over the reservation book, warmly greeting guests, and perhaps darting into the lounge to sneak a peek at a soccer game on television.This is his house, it's clear, an impression reinforced by the restaurant's location in a historic home on Main Street. And like a comfortable home, there is nothing fussy or deluxe about the decor at Tersiguel's. The fanciest touch is the pair of chandeliers in the entryway; the most charming is the stone planter with bright pink cosmos in the garden room in back.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
Cheese is among the most versatile of foods, which makes it great for entertaining, whether casual or formal. It works served quite simply, with French bread and a glass of wine or beer, or it can be made far more elegant and complex, such as drizzled with liqueur, topped with apricots, raisins, and pine nuts and lightly baked.We asked a couple of chefs, a purveyor and a cheese book author for some suggestions for serving cheese, and how to select cheeses and accompaniments for a cheese plate (country of origin and type of milk are indicated in brackets after cheese names)
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