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By From Sun news services | November 25, 2008
WASHINGTON - Even without Gilbert Arenas and another injured starter, the Washington Wizards never imagined they would be as bad as the franchise ever has been. So after opening 1-10 to match the worst start in team history, the Wizards fired coach Eddie Jordan and gave director of player development Ed Tapscott his first NBA head coaching job. "That's an unacceptable record, obviously," team president Ernie Grunfeld said. "We thought the change needed to be made." With that in mind, Grunfeld phoned Jordan and delivered the news - after the coach spent yesterday morning distributing turkeys during a team charity event.
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By Michael Lee and Michael Lee,The Washington Post | June 25, 2009
WASHINGTON - - When Washington Wizards president Ernie Grunfeld approached coach Flip Saunders about the possibility of acquiring Mike Miller and Randy Foye from the Minnesota Timberwolves, he didn't have to make a hard sell. Saunders, the former Timberwolves coach, still has a residence in suburban Minneapolis and spent his season away from coaching watching his former team on a regular basis. Because he was familiar with the strengths of both players, Saunders was immediately on board.
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By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2005
Kwame Brown's four-year career with the Washington Wizards appears to be heading rapidly toward its conclusion. Brown, who was made the No. 1 overall pick in the 2001 NBA draft by then-team president Michael Jordan, was suspended yesterday for the remainder of the playoffs. Shortly before the Wizards left for Chicago to play the Bulls in tonight's Game 5 of their best-of-seven opening-round series, Wizards president of basketball operations Ernie Grunfeld made the announcement that Brown would no longer play with the team this season.
SPORTS
By From Sun news services | November 25, 2008
WASHINGTON - Even without Gilbert Arenas and another injured starter, the Washington Wizards never imagined they would be as bad as the franchise ever has been. So after opening 1-10 to match the worst start in team history, the Wizards fired coach Eddie Jordan and gave director of player development Ed Tapscott his first NBA head coaching job. "That's an unacceptable record, obviously," team president Ernie Grunfeld said. "We thought the change needed to be made." With that in mind, Grunfeld phoned Jordan and delivered the news - after the coach spent yesterday morning distributing turkeys during a team charity event.
SPORTS
By Michael Lee and Michael Lee,The Washington Post | June 25, 2009
WASHINGTON - - When Washington Wizards president Ernie Grunfeld approached coach Flip Saunders about the possibility of acquiring Mike Miller and Randy Foye from the Minnesota Timberwolves, he didn't have to make a hard sell. Saunders, the former Timberwolves coach, still has a residence in suburban Minneapolis and spent his season away from coaching watching his former team on a regular basis. Because he was familiar with the strengths of both players, Saunders was immediately on board.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 21, 2004
WHEN HE HEARS sports talk radio callers say blow up the Wizards, Washington general manager Ernie Grunfeld thinks back to the start of the season. Fans were "unbelievably supportive" of the Wizards' plan to rebuild with young players, to go about things "the right way." "The city understood that," Grunfeld said. Way back then - it seems so long ago - the post-Michael Jordan Wizards were running and gunning, taking down Western Conference powers such as the Mavericks. Free-agent gym rat Gilbert Arenas was looking every bit the $64 million answer.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 15, 2005
WIZARDS FANS are leaving their No. 23 jerseys home in the closet this season. They're asking a simple question: Michael Who? Eighteen months A.J. (After Jordan), the Wizards are one of the surprises in an NBA where the Lakers are no longer a dynasty, the Timberwolves have fallen off as Western Conference powers, where the Nets are light-years away from their twin Eastern Conference titles. A lot can change in 18 months, including the future of a franchise that traded Michael Jordan for coach Eddie Jordan, then brought in Ernie Grunfeld to the front office to do for Washington what he did in New York and Milwaukee: win, but more than just win. "I don't know what happened before I got here.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2005
Four years ago, the Milwaukee Bucks were one of the best teams in the NBA. Built around scorers Ray Allen, Sam Cassell and Glenn Robinson, the Bucks won the Central Division with a 52-30 record and reached the Eastern Conference finals before losing to Philadelphia in a seven-game series. Believing that the Bucks were one tough inside player away from getting to the league finals and maybe even winning a championship, general manager Ernie Grunfeld added one significant piece to his team's puzzle: veteran forward Anthony Mason.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2004
WASHINGTON - Here's what the Washington Wizards and Jerry Stackhouse agree on: The forward will not play tonight against the New Orleans Hornets, and his ailing right knee will be examined by a team doctor either today or tomorrow. From there, however, Stackhouse and the Wizards, or more specifically, Ernie Grunfeld, the team's president of basketball operations, don't quite seem to be in agreement. While Stackhouse apparently is inclined to believe he needs to get totally healthy before he can play, Grunfeld said yesterday the team wants to see if Stackhouse's knee, which was operated on in the preseason, is structurally sound before deciding whether the forward will shut it down for the regular season, which has 25 games left.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
WASHINGTON - Washington Wizards forward Jerry Stackhouse has effectively ruled himself out of the final 25 games of the regular season to continue to rehabilitate his ailing right knee. Stackhouse, who missed the first 45 games of the season after having offseason surgery beneath his right kneecap, said complications from the operation have hampered his ability to play at peak efficiency. "When you jump back into a pro game and it's going full speed, it takes its toll on your whole body," said Stackhouse after yesterday's 122-110 loss to the Los Angeles Lakers.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | November 2, 2005
WASHINGTON -- When the Washington Wizards signed Gilbert Arenas to a six-year, $64 million contract during the summer of 2003, many thought that newly arrived general manager Ernie Grunfeld had overpaid - badly - for his first major acquisition. In two seasons with the Golden State Warriors, Arenas had gone from being a little-used rookie to the NBA's Most Improved Player, but his flakiness had been an issue at times. Even when he chose between signing with the Wizards and Los Angeles Clippers that summer, Arenas said his decision came after flipping a coin.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2005
Kwame Brown's four-year career with the Washington Wizards appears to be heading rapidly toward its conclusion. Brown, who was made the No. 1 overall pick in the 2001 NBA draft by then-team president Michael Jordan, was suspended yesterday for the remainder of the playoffs. Shortly before the Wizards left for Chicago to play the Bulls in tonight's Game 5 of their best-of-seven opening-round series, Wizards president of basketball operations Ernie Grunfeld made the announcement that Brown would no longer play with the team this season.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2005
Four years ago, the Milwaukee Bucks were one of the best teams in the NBA. Built around scorers Ray Allen, Sam Cassell and Glenn Robinson, the Bucks won the Central Division with a 52-30 record and reached the Eastern Conference finals before losing to Philadelphia in a seven-game series. Believing that the Bucks were one tough inside player away from getting to the league finals and maybe even winning a championship, general manager Ernie Grunfeld added one significant piece to his team's puzzle: veteran forward Anthony Mason.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 15, 2005
WIZARDS FANS are leaving their No. 23 jerseys home in the closet this season. They're asking a simple question: Michael Who? Eighteen months A.J. (After Jordan), the Wizards are one of the surprises in an NBA where the Lakers are no longer a dynasty, the Timberwolves have fallen off as Western Conference powers, where the Nets are light-years away from their twin Eastern Conference titles. A lot can change in 18 months, including the future of a franchise that traded Michael Jordan for coach Eddie Jordan, then brought in Ernie Grunfeld to the front office to do for Washington what he did in New York and Milwaukee: win, but more than just win. "I don't know what happened before I got here.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - Who knows how long Jerry Stackhouse will be out of the Washington Wizards' lineup, or if he will even return? The Wizards didn't need their forward last night at MCI Center as they scored a 111-106 overtime decision over the New Orleans Hornets after surrendering a 21-point third-quarter lead. Guard Gilbert Arenas scored 35 points for a second straight game, hitting two of his five three-pointers in overtime. The third-year guard played all 53 minutes, dishing out 11 assists in the process, as he continued his most torrid streak since returning from three stints on the injured list with a severe abdominal strain.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2004
WASHINGTON - Here's what the Washington Wizards and Jerry Stackhouse agree on: The forward will not play tonight against the New Orleans Hornets, and his ailing right knee will be examined by a team doctor either today or tomorrow. From there, however, Stackhouse and the Wizards, or more specifically, Ernie Grunfeld, the team's president of basketball operations, don't quite seem to be in agreement. While Stackhouse apparently is inclined to believe he needs to get totally healthy before he can play, Grunfeld said yesterday the team wants to see if Stackhouse's knee, which was operated on in the preseason, is structurally sound before deciding whether the forward will shut it down for the regular season, which has 25 games left.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - Who knows how long Jerry Stackhouse will be out of the Washington Wizards' lineup, or if he will even return? The Wizards didn't need their forward last night at MCI Center as they scored a 111-106 overtime decision over the New Orleans Hornets after surrendering a 21-point third-quarter lead. Guard Gilbert Arenas scored 35 points for a second straight game, hitting two of his five three-pointers in overtime. The third-year guard played all 53 minutes, dishing out 11 assists in the process, as he continued his most torrid streak since returning from three stints on the injured list with a severe abdominal strain.
SPORTS
By DON MARKUS and DON MARKUS,SUN REPORTER | November 2, 2005
WASHINGTON -- When the Washington Wizards signed Gilbert Arenas to a six-year, $64 million contract during the summer of 2003, many thought that newly arrived general manager Ernie Grunfeld had overpaid - badly - for his first major acquisition. In two seasons with the Golden State Warriors, Arenas had gone from being a little-used rookie to the NBA's Most Improved Player, but his flakiness had been an issue at times. Even when he chose between signing with the Wizards and Los Angeles Clippers that summer, Arenas said his decision came after flipping a coin.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
WASHINGTON - Washington Wizards forward Jerry Stackhouse has effectively ruled himself out of the final 25 games of the regular season to continue to rehabilitate his ailing right knee. Stackhouse, who missed the first 45 games of the season after having offseason surgery beneath his right kneecap, said complications from the operation have hampered his ability to play at peak efficiency. "When you jump back into a pro game and it's going full speed, it takes its toll on your whole body," said Stackhouse after yesterday's 122-110 loss to the Los Angeles Lakers.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 21, 2004
WHEN HE HEARS sports talk radio callers say blow up the Wizards, Washington general manager Ernie Grunfeld thinks back to the start of the season. Fans were "unbelievably supportive" of the Wizards' plan to rebuild with young players, to go about things "the right way." "The city understood that," Grunfeld said. Way back then - it seems so long ago - the post-Michael Jordan Wizards were running and gunning, taking down Western Conference powers such as the Mavericks. Free-agent gym rat Gilbert Arenas was looking every bit the $64 million answer.
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