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NEWS
By Ben Wattenberg | April 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Because Bob Dole is no kid, age is going to be a serious issue in this election. Accordingly, we ought to try to talk about it seriously, at least some of the time. We've already heard that the ''Dole 96'' campaign button does not refer to his age.Last week, CBS News correspondent Jacqueline Adams reported, semi-humorously, on a study by neuropsychologists at the University of Pennsylvania. The team, headed by Dr. Ruben Gur, reports that as we age, brain cells shrink almost three times faster among men than among women.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 16, 2014
It is Science day in this space, and we will be taking a look a three recent studies: why men get grumpy after age 70, why parental involvement in a child's education isn't what it's cracked up to be and what makes couples stick pins in voodoo dolls that represent their mates. Like many, I have always assumed that the oversight I provided during my children's school years was responsible in large measure for their academic success. Not only that, but I assumed that their classmates who struggled did so because there was nobody at home supervising homework and bedtime reading, nobody volunteering in the classroom or showing up at teacher conferences.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 3, 1996
This is an election year. Duck.Scientists in Israel and Bethesda have isolated the gene for grumpy. The gene for cheerful eludes them.The leading folk of the Eastern Shore should retreat to the shores of the Dead Sea to resolve their differences.N May the New Year bring blessings no worse than last year's.
SPORTS
By Tania Ganguli and Tribune Newspapers | February 17, 2010
Several joking references to Chip Ganassi's disposition were made the morning after driver Jamie McMurray delivered the first Daytona 500 victory for both men. "Chip, does this prove nice guys can finish first?" a reporter asked. A pause followed and smirks began developing around the room. "In the case of Jamie," the reporter clarified, and all those on stage - McMurray, Kevin Manion and Felix Sabates - and everyone watching them burst into laughter. Ganassi even chuckled.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN | September 19, 2000
Did Australia deport all of its grumpy people for the Olympics, or does the climate and geography simply make everyone cheery? From the hotel chambermaid to the honcho who handles media access at the International Aquatic Centre, everyone in Sydney is accommodating and good-natured. Need transport? No worries. Need a sandwich at 2:30 a.m.? Coming up. There are 60,000 volunteers working the Games, and their demeanor makes the employees at Disney World seem more like Scrooge McDuck. "I suppose people who volunteer tend to be people who are into people," said one, who did not look like Barbra Streisand.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | April 19, 2001
WHEN Daniel Brashear arose from sleep each morning and inhaled his first gentle cigarette puff of the day, he imagined himself a citizen. This was a mistake, as Judge Frederic N. Smalkin informed him the other day. Brashear is merely a prison inmate, and distinctions have to be made. This is not always so easy. It is one thing for prisoners to have television sets in their cells so they can enjoy the civilizing effects of Jerry Springer. It is another thing to have radios in their cells to enjoy the gentle ambience of Howard Stern.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | November 23, 1994
The hottest phrase in American journalism the past two weeks has been "mean-spirited."It's been used by countless irate commentators and stunned liberals to describe the mood of the voters in the recent election.The voters were mean-spirited, we're told, for electing candidates who talked about shrinking welfare, putting criminals in prison, and cutting taxes and government spending.The single biggest group of mean-spirited voters was said to be those in California who overwhelmingly approved withholding various social benefits from illegal immigrants.
SPORTS
By Vic Ziegel and Vic Ziegel,New York Daily News | June 14, 1992
The New York Mets have fallen asleep, dead asleep. They wake up for a few minutes at the end of each game to remind us that it's a long season, plenty of baseball left, relax, don't worry. The next time we see them they're back on the ballfield, snoring.Shea Stadium -- where the Mets play the Pirates today -- hasn't been this quiet, this tame, in about a decade. This is the worst part of it: The fans are being put to sleep, too.The notion that the Mets have lots of time to straighten themselves out is probably accurate, and downright foolish.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 25, 2008
As for the nattering negativists who will surely say this is a dumb idea, that it will never work, that Baltimore will never get this and never get that - well, blah, blah, blah. We've heard it all before. Mr. Grumpy-Gills really should treat himself to the big picture sometime. I know. It's hard. You've grown accustomed to thinking weenie and being cynical. After all, that's part of our national culture, and the condition has long been acute here in Baltimore, where the only thing we've had to "celebrate" lately was the Orioles' win in the World Series - 25 years ago. But, really, the many of you who think small, and who make a hobby of ridiculing Baltimore and taking glee at the city's flaws, you who today think building a big, new arena on the site of our old, dumpy-but-still-bookin'-dates one is a foolish idea - you really need to get out more.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | August 20, 1994
Give Damon Wayans credit: Whatever his sins, vanity is not one of them. Achieving star status in "The Last Boy Scout," he didn't use it to spotlight himself as the world's coolest dude. Instead, as in "Mo' Money" and now in "Blankman," he's chosen to play nerds."Blankman" is, in fact, a kind of "Revenge of the Nerds V: The Superhero Who Couldn't Fly -- or Even Catch the Bus." It follows as a hopelessly uncool, unhip, unsuave young man manages to triumph over all -- in his underwear, it is true, but a triumph none the less.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 25, 2008
As for the nattering negativists who will surely say this is a dumb idea, that it will never work, that Baltimore will never get this and never get that - well, blah, blah, blah. We've heard it all before. Mr. Grumpy-Gills really should treat himself to the big picture sometime. I know. It's hard. You've grown accustomed to thinking weenie and being cynical. After all, that's part of our national culture, and the condition has long been acute here in Baltimore, where the only thing we've had to "celebrate" lately was the Orioles' win in the World Series - 25 years ago. But, really, the many of you who think small, and who make a hobby of ridiculing Baltimore and taking glee at the city's flaws, you who today think building a big, new arena on the site of our old, dumpy-but-still-bookin'-dates one is a foolish idea - you really need to get out more.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2006
Are you a forty-something grouch who's first to shout invectives in a slow-moving checkout lane? A youngster who mocks your dad's wise counsel? A graduate student known for driving the renowned professor crazy with sardonic verbiage? Take hope: Today, you might be dismissed as a smart-aleck. In your old age, you might be viewed as smarter than average. Or at least that's what Morgan State psychology professor Jacqueline Bichsel suggests. She recently co-authored a study that invites the conclusion that upon reaching 60, disagreeable people maintain a higher level of intelligence than more easy-going seniors.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
As he talks about the challenge of guarding the top offensive players in collegiate lacrosse, or the escape he enjoys in the works of novelists such as Dan Brown or Robert Ludlum, or the thrill of playing for an NCAA title, Navy senior defenseman Mitch Hendler is relaxed and smiling. The other Hendler, the one junior goalie Matt Russell refers to as "bitter Mitch," has vacated the room. The Midshipmen like having Hendler around, whatever his mood. Some days, Hendler is a grumpy sort who refuses to tolerate mental lapses and will not hesitate to let an offending teammate know about it. After he has suffered through a typically sleepless night before a game, Hendler controls his emotions; unleashes his tenacity, superb positioning and stick skills; and shuts down another scoring threat.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | April 29, 2001
FORGIVE Parris Glendening if he feels he's being forced to watch re-runs of "Grumpy Old Men" when he shows up at Board of Public Works meetings. It has turned into a comic sideshow. Grumpiest of the grumps is Comptroller William Donald Schaefer, whose life isn't complete if he can't aim acidic barbs and insults at the current governor. Anything to embarrass Mr. Glendening. Make him turn beet red. Recently, he's aimed poisoned darts at Treasurer Richard N. Dixon, a fellow grump and AARP-eligible colleague.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | April 19, 2001
WHEN Daniel Brashear arose from sleep each morning and inhaled his first gentle cigarette puff of the day, he imagined himself a citizen. This was a mistake, as Judge Frederic N. Smalkin informed him the other day. Brashear is merely a prison inmate, and distinctions have to be made. This is not always so easy. It is one thing for prisoners to have television sets in their cells so they can enjoy the civilizing effects of Jerry Springer. It is another thing to have radios in their cells to enjoy the gentle ambience of Howard Stern.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN | September 19, 2000
Did Australia deport all of its grumpy people for the Olympics, or does the climate and geography simply make everyone cheery? From the hotel chambermaid to the honcho who handles media access at the International Aquatic Centre, everyone in Sydney is accommodating and good-natured. Need transport? No worries. Need a sandwich at 2:30 a.m.? Coming up. There are 60,000 volunteers working the Games, and their demeanor makes the employees at Disney World seem more like Scrooge McDuck. "I suppose people who volunteer tend to be people who are into people," said one, who did not look like Barbra Streisand.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | May 1, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- In the interest of local literacy, herewith a regional reader to make the alphabet more meaningful to Marylanders.A is for Annapolis, its harbor full of boats, and also for Assembly, where lobbyists buy votes. Allegany offers us another use for A. (Don't spell Allegany in any other way.) A is very useful when you mention Aberdeen, where the Army tests Artillery, and the Air is slightly green.B is for Baltimore, Charm City sublime. It has certain little problems, not the least of which is crime, but it also offers hTC Baseball in a Ballpark which is nice, and Bars for Buying Beer in mugs all rimmed with ice. (B used to be for B'hoys, but it isn't any more.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | April 4, 2000
NEW YORK -- If you thought winning the home opener in dramatic fashion might boost Rickey Henderson's level of happiness, think again. Derek Bell's tiebreaking home run in the eighth inning of yesterday's 2-1 win over the San Diego Padres did little to raise the spirits or interest level of the New York Mets' contractually challenged leadoff man. "I just ain't into it right now, that's all," Henderson said. "We won the ballgame, but right now I don't know how I feel about it. I'm just not in it. My mind ain't in it. That's about it."
SPORTS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | April 4, 2000
NEW YORK -- If you thought winning the home opener in dramatic fashion might boost Rickey Henderson's level of happiness, think again. Derek Bell's tiebreaking home run in the eighth inning of yesterday's 2-1 win over the San Diego Padres did little to raise the spirits or interest level of the New York Mets' contractually challenged leadoff man. "I just ain't into it right now, that's all," Henderson said. "We won the ballgame, but right now I don't know how I feel about it. I'm just not in it. My mind ain't in it. That's about it."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 25, 1997
Though it tries hard, "I'm Not Rappaport" can never really escape the reality that it's about two old guys sitting on a Central Park bench, talking.Originally a beloved stage play, where its artificiality was not a liability but a value, the film version feels static and slow-moving. Worse, the actors, particularly Walter Matthau, have been instructed to try to reach Row ZZ in the third balcony and to pay no attention to that camera thing there, two feet away. It was directed, perhaps too reverentially, by its playwright, Herb Gardner, most famous for the winsome "A Thousand Clowns."
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