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By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1994
SALISBURY -- Roxbury Electronics Corp., a privately owned, Boston-based electronics company, came to the rescue of Grumman Corp.'s struggling aircraft cable plant yesterday. But workers were left wondering just how many of their jobs would be saved.The company announced that it will take over the 9-year-old Grumman plant, which was scheduled to close at the end of this year. But it was noncommittal about how many of the plant's 115 workers it would hire, saying only that it would "try to save as many jobs as possible."
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Northrop Grumman broke ground Monday on a 25,00-square-foot facility specializing in cargo bound for space, the latest expansion to Maryland's slowly growing space industry. The $20 million center near Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will be used to create and test space payloads and will feature a three-story, 6,000-square-foot clean room, a climate-controlled, air-locked facility where sensitive equipment can be made free of contaminants. That clean room will be the largest on the company's 129-acre campus in Anne Arundel County.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer The New York Times News Service contributed to this article | March 26, 1994
Grumman Corp.'s board of directors proclaimed its neutrality yesterday on Northrop Corp.'s hostile $2.04 billion takeover bid, putting the pressure on Martin Marietta Corp. to take the next move in the battle for Grumman.Industry analysts said Grumman's filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday showed that the company was seriously considering Northrop's offer and raised the likelihood that Bethesda-based Martin Marietta would increase its $1.87 billion offer, which expires at midnight April 4.Charles P. Manor, a spokesman for Martin Marietta, declined to comment about the possibility of a higher bid for Grumman.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2014
Northrop Grumman Corp. will break ground Monday on a new space engineering facility in Linthicum, according to a release from the defense contractor. The $20 million, 25,000-square-foot facility is expected to be completed next summer. Eighty employees will work at the facility on space systems assembly, integration and testing, the release said. Sen. Ben Cardin and Reps. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger and John Sarbanes are scheduled to attend the groundbreaking ceremony at Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems' BWI Marshall Airport campus in Linthicum.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Ian Johnson contributed to this article | March 11, 1994
Northrop Corp. launched a $2.04 billion tender offer yesterday to buy Grumman Corp., shocking Grumman and Wall Street and topping an offer for the defense contractor made just three days earlier by Martin Marietta Corp.Bethesda-based Martin Marietta, which had hoped to forestall a bidding war for Grumman with its $1.9 billion cash offer, denounced the Northrop move, saying that it is "deeply disappointed that Northrop has chosen to launch a hostile attack that seeks to disrupt an agreement between Martin Marietta and Grumman for a friendly consolidation."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
Grumman Corp. is scheduled to announce today the sale of its aircraft cable production plant in Salisbury, a move that could save most, if not all, of the approximately 240 jobs at the 9-year-old complex.Gov. William Donald Schaefer will join with Grumman, Salisbury and Wicomico County officials at a news conference this morning in making an announcement that one Salisbury official said "should be a very happy day for this city."Grumman announced in May that it would close the Salisbury plant, eliminating 244 jobs by the end of 1994.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1994
The battle for control of Grumman Corp. took a strange turn yesterday when Northrop Corp. said it was prepared to raise its bid to $62 a share from $60, but only if it agreed to a merger offer within 24 hours.Northrop's surprise move puts the Los Angeles-based company in the unusual position of bidding against itself, because its previous offer of $60 a share was already $5 higher than Martin Marietta Corp.'s only bid.Northrop's latest strategy was viewed by analysts as a move to force Grumman to change the bidding rules it has established for winning control of the company in favor of a more open and public bidding procedure.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1994
The deadlines came and went yesterday with no new scrimmages in the takeover battle between Martin Marietta Corp. and Northrop Corp. for control of Grumman Corp.Grumman declined to say if either of its suitors submitted a new bid before the 5 p.m. EST deadline that it set earlier this week for the competitors to submit their "best and highest offer."On Wednesday, Northrop announced that it was prepared to up its bid to $62 a share, or $2.11 billion, but only if it reached a merger agreement with Grumman by 3 p.m. yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1994
Grumman Corp. was being wooed by a huge California defense contractor when it agreed earlier this week to be acquired by Martin Marietta Corp. But analysts said yesterday that they do not anticipate a bidding war to break.In documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission yesterday, Grumman disclosed that Northrop Corp. had made an offer to purchase Grumman.The documents also show that Martin Marietta was anxious to move rapidly and sweetened its offer as a means to discourage any rival bids for Grumman.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | July 17, 1991
Grumman Corp., the nation's smallest military airplane maker, has teamed with two industry giants -- Lockheed Corp. and the Boeing Co. -- to compete for a Navy contract to build the next generation of carrier bombers, the Bethpage, N.Y.-based company announced yesterday.The plane that the Grumman team will be bidding on is in the conceptual planning stages.Designated the AX, the new plane is designed to replace the A-6 carrier-based attack bomber that dates to the Vietnam War. The Navy was developing the A-12 for this role, but Defense Secretary Dick Cheney canceled that program earlier this year when it fell behind schedule and rose over budget.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Richard C. "Rick" Hrybyk, a Northrop Grumman electrical engineer and a triathlete, died Friday of a heart attack at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The lifelong Linthicum resident was 55. The son of the late William L. Hrybyk, a Westinghouse Electric Corp. electrical engineer, and Catherine Hrybyk, a retired educator, Richard Conrad Hrybyk was born in Baltimore and raised in Linthicum. After graduating in 1976 from Andover High School, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1981 from the University of Maryland, College Park and a master's degree in 1989 from what is now Loyola University Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
John P. O'Brien, a manufacturing supervisor who was also a licensed charter boat captain, died Sunday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, at his home in Severna Park. He was 56. The son of a licensed charter boat captain and a homemaker, John Patrick O'Brien was born in St. Louis and raised in Severna Park, where he graduated in 1976 from Severna Park High School. He attended the University of Maryland University College. Since 1985, he had been a manufacturing supervisor at Northrop Grumman at its Linthicum facility.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Northrop Grumman Corp. has signed on as a sponsor of DreamIt Health Baltimore, a business accelerator backed by Johns Hopkins University and BioHealth Innovation Inc. The accelerator gives startups $50,000 in seed funding, help gathering customers, and accounting and legal support, along with access to the expertise of the sponsors. Philadelphia-based accelerator DreamIt Ventures launched the incubator. Leaders at the companies and Hopkins will choose up to 10 startups for the accelerator, starting with an "entrepreneurial boot-camp" in Baltimore from January through May. Applications were due Nov. 18. Northrop Grumman provides health information technology products and services to federal agencies, the military and state, local and international governments.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Edward H. Hooper, a retired electrical engineer and model railroader, died July 8 from Parkinson's disease at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 81. Edward Harley Hooper was born in Massena, N.Y., and raised in Muscle Shoals, Ala., where he graduated in 1949 from Sheffield High School. After serving in the Air Force, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1956 in electrical engineering from Auburn University. He began working for Westinghouse Electric Co. in 1961 as an electrical engineer, and retired in 1996 from successor company Northrop Grumman's Linthicum facility.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 18, 2013
A recent Fallston High School graduate is one of 24 winners in Northrop Grumman Corporation's 11th annual Engineering Scholars Program, which will provide a total of $240,000 in college scholarships this fall to high school seniors across Maryland interested in studying engineering, computer science, physics or math. Scholarship recipient John Augustine O'Neill, a Forest Hill resident, graduated from Fallston High School earlier this month as his class Valedictorian. He is the son of Harry and Stephanie O'Neill.
NEWS
June 18, 2013
Perry Hall High School graduate Nathaniel Lebedda has been named Baltimore County recipient of a $10,000 Engineering Scholars Awards scholarship from the Northrop Grumman Corp. Lebedda, who received his diploma from Perry Hall on May 31, is one of 24 Maryland graduating seniors - one from each of the state's school systems -- to earn the award. The scholarship, payable over four years, is given to students preparing to study an engineering-related field, such as computer science, physics or math.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1994
The declining defense budget has claimed another victim.Grumman Corp. announced yesterday that it will close its aircraft machining plant in Glen Arm by the end of the year and lay off 54 workers -- the last of a work force that numbered nearly 300 a few years back.The closing of the Grumman plant did not come as a surprise. Grumman said last year that it would either sell the Glen Arm facility or close it as part of a continuing company consolidation. Grumman has since been acquired by Northrop Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
William J. "Bill" Turcovski, a Northrop Grumman electrical engineer who enjoyed antiquing, died May 7 from pneumonia at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. He was 52. The son of a supervisor and a homemaker, William John Turcovski was born and raised in Altoona, Pa., where he graduated in 1978 from Altoona Area High School. After graduating in 1982 with a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Pennsylvania State University, he began his career at Westinghouse Electric Corp.'s Linthicum plant, which is now Northrop Grumman.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
Northrop Grumman on Wednesday notified about 60 people, primarily in Maryland and Virginia, in its electronics systems segment that they will be out of jobs at the end of the month. In October, the aerospace and defense contractor announced it was cutting its electronic systems staff by up to 350 positions. About 280 people accepted voluntary buyouts, but "the number of volunteers did not reduce our headcount to the extent required," Jack Martin Jr., a Northrop Grumman spokesman, said Wednesday.
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