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By Los Angeles Times | May 23, 1995
MOSCOW -- Separatist leader Dzhokhar M. Dudayev and Russian officials in Chechnya have agreed for the first time in their five-month war to hold peace talks led by an outside mediator.The negotiations are to begin Thursday in Grozny, Chechnya's capital, with mediation by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, which has been trying for a month to bring the warring sides together.Sandor Mezsaroz, a Hungarian diplomat who heads the OSCE mission, announced the agreement yesterday.
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NEWS
November 19, 2004
THE DIFFERENCE between Grozny and Fallujah is that American troops proved far better at minimizing their own casualties in Iraq than the Russians did in Chechnya. Otherwise, the results look remarkably similar: cities torn apart, their buildings pulverized, their streets littered with corpses, and their hundreds of thousands of residents scattered across the countryside, some with relatives and some in makeshift and unsanitary refugee camps. The Russians first smashed Grozny in 1995 and were back to do it all over again in 1999.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 4, 1995
GROZNY, Russia -- This grim city was strewn yesterday with scores of dead Russian soldiers, who lay in stacks along the broad, tree-lined boulevards.Wild dogs roamed among them on the streets. Old women locked out of darkened basements wailed in terror, shielding their eyes from the frightening skies above.Although many people have thought it was not possible, the fighting for the Chechen capital keeps worsening.Desperate Russian troops caught inside the city blasted away with tanks, hitting both the presidential palace and the Parliament.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 14, 2004
MOSCOW - A remotely detonated bomb struck the motorcade of Chechnya's acting president yesterday in the capital of Grozny, killing a presidential guard and demonstrating again the resilience and skill of the republic's separatist militants. The president, Sergei Abramov, narrowly escaped injury, although three other members of his entourage were injured, according to Ruslan Alkhanov, commander of a special police task force. Russian news agencies reported that Abramov had been touring the ruined city with managers of a construction company, reviewing sites for potential reconstruction.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 26, 1995
GROZNY, Russia -- The dazed and the numb have begun to leave their cellars, to blink in the bright dusty sunshine, to get on with life in a city that lacks water, electricity, medicine, shelter, even hope.Watched by soldiers wearing black bandannas across their faces like cattle rustlers in the Wild West, the survivors of Grozny plod along the long, pulverized streets, along block after block of unrelenting rubble, the people puny against the devastation.The war in Chechnya has passed on to other places.
NEWS
By N.Y. TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 1999
MOSCOW -- After weeks of trying to persuade civilians to flee Grozny, Russian officials said yesterday that residents had missed their chance to leave and should hide in their shelters until Russian forces have secured the Chechen capital. Yesterday's warning was a fresh indication that the climactic battle for the city is finally at hand. It was also a somber reminder that Russian forces are determined to quickly subdue Grozny even if it means fighting in a city still occupied by tens of thousands of civilians.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 18, 1995
SAMARA, Russia -- Surviving officers of Russia's most crippled regiment believe they know what went wrong when their men took horrendous casualties in Chechnya: They contend that Russia's liberal politicians stabbed them in the back.It's a time-honored complaint among losing soldiers, but it could be a harbinger of dangerous unrest in the military in the months to come.The officers of the 81st Motorized Infantry Regiment, based in this Volga River city, say they were ordered into Grozny, the capital of rebellious Chechnya, on New Year's Eve and then were abandoned when the government withdrew air and artillery support because of protests over the killing of Chechen civilians.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 1, 1996
GROZNY, Russia -- Kadijat Zelinhanova was an unlikely messenger in a very unlikely meeting between Chechen guerrillas and Russian troops.Her floral skirt rustled in the summer breeze as she scurried in her house slippers across the broken glass, spent ammunition and crumbled plaster of war's destruction. The 35-year-old city employee was the go-between Wednesday for one of the first joint Russian-Chechen operations called for in last week's truce between the two sides in Russia's bloody civil war.There were few formalities.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 5, 2004
GROZNY, Chechnya - When Dr. Sultan N. Magomadov walks through this city of ghosts, he sometimes recognizes a familiar shape half-buried in the rubble. With his slender fingers, the 74-year-old physician will toss aside bits of wood, metal and masonry. Careful not to soil his crisply ironed shirt, he'll tug out a piece of Chechnya's lost culture: a medical book, perhaps, or a collection of Tolstoy's short stories. Three times in his life, Sultan has lost nearly everything he possessed - to tyranny, to terror and to war. Each time, the diminutive scholar has rebuilt his life.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 23, 1999
MOSCOW -- Deliberately or not, Russian military leaders and politicians gave varied, incomplete and inconsistent accounts yesterday of the explosions that tore through central Grozny Thursday evening, killing more than 100 people and seriously injuring scores of others. Those who might be in a position to know what happened and who was responsible spoke in many voices. There were flat denials and what seemed to be carefully worded denials. There was a hedged acknowledgment, and there were unsupported insinuations.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 10, 2004
MOSCOW - The man the Kremlin relied on to crack down on the rebellious republic of Chechnya was killed yesterday after a bomb tore through a crowded grandstand in Grozny during ceremonies commemorating the end of World War II. Chechen President Akhmad Kadyrov, a 52-year-old Muslim cleric and former rebel leader, died along with at least three others yesterday after the device exploded under the VIP section of Dynamo Stadium in the center of the Chechen...
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 5, 2004
GROZNY, Chechnya - When Dr. Sultan N. Magomadov walks through this city of ghosts, he sometimes recognizes a familiar shape half-buried in the rubble. With his slender fingers, the 74-year-old physician will toss aside bits of wood, metal and masonry. Careful not to soil his crisply ironed shirt, he'll tug out a piece of Chechnya's lost culture: a medical book, perhaps, or a collection of Tolstoy's short stories. Three times in his life, Sultan has lost nearly everything he possessed - to tyranny, to terror and to war. Each time, the diminutive scholar has rebuilt his life.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 2003
GROZNY, Chechnya - With an election for choosing the next president of Chechnya only days away, officials in this broken, pulverized city are gripped by an almost surreal optimism. Everything is secure, they cheerfully say, despite frequent attacks on Russian troops by Chechen rebels and the nightly crackle of gunfire. Civilians feel increasingly safe, the officials boast, though Chechens themselves say they fear both the rebels fighting for independence and the Russian soldiers. And voters feel confident that the election Sunday will be fair, organizers insist, even though human rights groups allege that the vote is rigged to favor the Kremlin's favored presidential candidate, Akhmad Kadyrov.
NEWS
By Seamus Martin and Seamus Martin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2003
Seamus Martin, former Moscow correspondent and international editor of The Irish Times, has reported on conflicts throughout the world, including those in Chechnya and Northern Ireland. He considers what lessons they offer for the war in Iraq, where by yesterday uniformed forces of the regime had disappeared and U.S.-led forces were entering an unpredictable civilian environment. There is no harm in euphoria provided it does not last too long. The victory should be celebrated but this should be done with an eye to the future.
NEWS
By Alex Rodriguez and Alex Rodriguez,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 2002
MOSCOW - Two suicide bombers in trucks rammed through security gates at the headquarters for Chechnya's Kremlin-backed government yesterday and detonated powerful blasts, killing at least 46 people in an attack Moscow linked to Chechen separatists. Many of the victims were in the building's first-floor dining hall. Dozens of dazed survivors staggered from the rubble, some with faces covered in blood. Bodies were found hundreds of yards from the building. Emergency rescue officials estimated the number injured at 70, though they said that count would probably rise.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 2002
MOSCOW -- Twenty-eight guerrillas laid down their arms yesterday in a move hailed by authorities as a sign that the situation in Chechnya is improving. But the killing of a pro-Russian party leader and the deaths of at least four Russians in 24 hours indicated it is not. Unidentified gunmen shot and killed the head of a pro-Kremlin party in the Chechen capital, Grozny, and two Russian policemen died in a clash with rebels in a nearby village, a Chechen government official said. Two other Russians died in other parts of the republic, spokesmen said.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 10, 2004
MOSCOW - The man the Kremlin relied on to crack down on the rebellious republic of Chechnya was killed yesterday after a bomb tore through a crowded grandstand in Grozny during ceremonies commemorating the end of World War II. Chechen President Akhmad Kadyrov, a 52-year-old Muslim cleric and former rebel leader, died along with at least three others yesterday after the device exploded under the VIP section of Dynamo Stadium in the center of the Chechen...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 27, 1999
MOSCOW -- After two days of fighting in the streets of Grozny, the Russian military conceded last night that its troops were meeting strong opposition as they struggled to seize control of the Chechen capital from Islamic rebels."
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 27, 2002
GROZNY, Russia - Though Russian forces overpowered Chechen guerrillas in Moscow yesterday, Russian army Capt. Dmitri Popadin and his men here in the Chechen capital seem destined to remain on duty indefinitely in an uninviting fortress overlooking a lonely stretch of road. They live inside Checkpoint 137, an outpost built of giant concrete blocks scavenged from piles of rubble and pockmarked apartment blocks that once constituted a city. For weeks at a time, they peer through gun slits at the traffic passing north from the city.
NEWS
By John Daniszewski and John Daniszewski,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 6, 2001
GROZNY, Russia - Oil-stained Movsar Muzayev looks his visitors over closely and then gestures for them to follow him to a trash heap at the back of his house, overlooking the smoke-gray Sunzha River. He kicks aside a few garbage bags and lifts a scrap of sheet metal to reveal a cylindrical steel boiler about the size of a small car buried in the riverbank. From it protrudes a Rube Goldberg agglomeration of pipes and tubes. Beneath the tank burns a carefully tended fire. Next, he points to a hose that emerges from the contraption, disappears into the river and re-emerges on the riverbank, where it runs into a steel drum a few yards away.
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