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By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
Bruce Holstein moved to Carroll County eight years ago looking for land to build a house so he could live closer to his grown daughter and her family. He settled on a historic road with no streetlights, flanked by maple and hickory trees, with corn and soybean farms in the distance. It's a small-town way of life that Holstein wants to preserve, and he sees no bigger threat than a statewide plan to direct development — a plan set to take effect as early as next month. Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley's effort to target growth near existing development — and to withhold funding from local governments that don't comply — has raised hackles in some corners of Maryland.
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NEWS
November 1, 2013
Thanks for your excellent reporting on the Charles County growth situation ( "State, Charles County at odds over growth plan," Oct. 28). I am conservation director for the Southern Region of the Maryland Bass Nation, a bass fishing organization. The area in and around Mattawoman Creek is one the country's best bass fisheries. Many national and regional bass fishing tournaments are held there, bringing many people to the area who provide revenues to local businesses such as motels and restaurants.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 30, 1994
WILMINGTON, Del. -- Bell Atlantic Chairman Raymond W. Smith had some advice yesterday for investors who might be waiting for the next big deal after the collapse of the $30 billion merger with Telecommunications Inc.: "Don't hold your breath."Speaking at the Philadelphia-based phone company's annual meeting in Wilmington, Mr. Smith outlined a growth plan that will rely on internal expansion rather than acquisition. The TCI deal, jTC he said, was "a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that will not come again."
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 24, 2013
Three Maryland counties have essentially violated the state's new law aimed at limiting growth on septic systems, a top O'Malley administration aide said Wednesday, adding that state officials are "weighing our options," including possible legal action or withholding of funds. Cecil, Frederick and Allegany counties did not follow the 2012 law in drawing up maps that were supposed to restrict where large housing subdivisions on septic may be built, Planning Secretary Richard E. Hall told lawmakers in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
Residents of the county's most densely populated area listened last night as officials discussed the latest growth plan for South Carroll covering transportation projects to ease congestion. About two dozen people attended the meeting at Liberty High School in Eldersburg, though public comment was not allowed. The Freedom Area Comprehensive Plan, a blueprint for growth in South Carroll, proposes 21 road projects, rezoning farmland to allow for construction of nearly 3,000 homes, and expanding the area's 30-year-old water treatment plant.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1999
In two workshops this week, the Carroll County Planning and Zoning Commission hopes to review numerous comments and amend a proposed growth plan for its most populated area.The comments stem from a public hearing early last month on the Freedom Area Comprehensive Plan that drew about 500 residents. The county also received many letters, e-mails and petitions protesting the plan.Residents are concerned about roads, schools and proposed zoning changes that could mean 3,000 more homes. The document addresses the next 20 years of development in South Carroll, where the population exceeds 28,000.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2002
As Carroll officials refine a growth plan for Finksburg, county planners again are asking residents for their input. But less than 10 percent of them have replied to a county survey that would help mesh residents' vision with the county master plan for the unincorporated area along Route 140. "Now is the time for those of us who live in Finksburg to have the final say in our future," Neil Ridgely, an unsuccessful candidate for county commissioner, said...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1997
COLLEGE PARK -- Seeking support for his Smart Growth legislation, Gov. Parris N. Glendening warned yesterday that suburban sprawl is burdening Maryland taxpayers, devastating the state's older communities and degrading the Chesapeake Bay."If we do not take steps to change our growth patterns," the governor said in a speech at the University of Maryland campus here, "the beautiful Maryland that we all love will be nothing more than a beautiful memory -- a memory that our children will never share."
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler | December 9, 2011
In what some see as a critical test of a recent Smart Growth law, environmental groups and some property owners have filed suit to overturn the recent decision by Queen Anne's County's commissioners to zone 525 acres of Eastern Shore farmland for development. The suit, filed Thursday in Centreville, charges that the commissioners violated state law Nov. 8 in narrowly approving rezoning of four farm tracts, two of them in the headwaters of the Wye River and one in the Choptank River watershed.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
The Howard County Council faces a busy voting session this week before the August recess, taking up the master plan for growth, several charter changes and whether to allow voters to consider term limits for newly elected council members. The master plan, PlanHoward 2030, is a guide to issues that include environmental protection, housing, transportation, and the redevelopment of U.S. 1 and U.S. 40. Years in the works by the council, Planning Board, Department of Planning and Zoning, consultants and citizens, the nearly 200-page proposal takes stock of changes since General Plan 2000, updates that document and generally maintains existing policies.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun and By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
The Howard County Council faces a busy voting session this week before the August recess, taking up the master plan for growth, several charter changes and whether to allow voters to consider term limits for newly elected council members. The master plan, PlanHoward 2030, is a guide to issues that include environmental protection, housing, transportation, and the redevelopment of U.S. 1 and U.S. 40. Years in the works by the council, Planning Board, Department of Planning and Zoning, consultants and citizens, the nearly 200-page proposal takes stock of changes since General Plan 2000, updates that document and generally maintains existing policies.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 29, 2012
The fate of the Chesapeake Bay may be found in its tributaries. Mattawoman Creek, one of the bay's healthiest, is losing ground to development and now stands "at a turning point" as Charles County plans for future growth in its watershed, a state-led task force warns. The combined state-federal task force, led by the Department of Natural Resources , says that the Mattawoman is losing the "near to the ideal" condition that characterized its waters nearly two decades ago. Although its watershed is still largely forested, and the stream itself retains one of the state's most diverse populations of fish, "possible signs of stress associated with human development have appeared.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 19, 2012
Stop the presses: A new report finds that Maryland's 15-year-old Smart Growth law isn't working very well. That's hardly news. The state's own data have shown for years that more land continues to be developed for homes in the countryside instead of in urbanized areas, where growth is meant to go under the 1997 law. But the report issued Wednesday by the National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education at the University...
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler | December 9, 2011
In what some see as a critical test of a recent Smart Growth law, environmental groups and some property owners have filed suit to overturn the recent decision by Queen Anne's County's commissioners to zone 525 acres of Eastern Shore farmland for development. The suit, filed Thursday in Centreville, charges that the commissioners violated state law Nov. 8 in narrowly approving rezoning of four farm tracts, two of them in the headwaters of the Wye River and one in the Choptank River watershed.
NEWS
By Richard E. Hall | October 31, 2011
Plenty of people have urged me not to attend today's forum about PlanMaryland sponsored by the Carroll County Board of Commissioners at the Pikesville Hilton. People who concur with us that PlanMaryland is a long-overdue idea, and even some who are less enthused, say the event is one-sided, not a public meeting and not worth our time. Their concern is that my attendance would legitimize the commissioners' invited speakers, whose views against smart growth and climate change are well-documented.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
Bruce Holstein moved to Carroll County eight years ago looking for land to build a house so he could live closer to his grown daughter and her family. He settled on a historic road with no streetlights, flanked by maple and hickory trees, with corn and soybean farms in the distance. It's a small-town way of life that Holstein wants to preserve, and he sees no bigger threat than a statewide plan to direct development — a plan set to take effect as early as next month. Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley's effort to target growth near existing development — and to withhold funding from local governments that don't comply — has raised hackles in some corners of Maryland.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1999
Residents of Carroll County's most densely populated area besieged officials last night with questions, comments and criticisms on the latest growth plan proposed for Eldersburg and Sykesville.About 400 people attended the hearing at Liberty High School, many bringing neighborhood petitions opposing the plan.Ted Cusick collected 425 signatures from his neighbors in the Linton Springs area protesting a proposed development that would add about 250 homes.Many offered statistics on roads, schools and public utilities, burdened by the nearly 30,000 residents -- more than double the number since the last growth plan was written 22 years ago for the county's southern end, known as the Freedom area.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2000
Carroll commissioners voted unanimously yesterday to allow county planners to tweak wording in the proposed blueprint for growth in South Carroll, the Freedom Area Comprehensive Plan, and present the document to the county planning commission for final approval. "It's a good opportunity for us to review, revise and update a plan that was approved a year and a half ago by the planning commission," said county Planning Director Steven C. Horn. "I think a better plan will result from this process."
NEWS
September 26, 2011
Maryland Planning Secretary Richard Hall is on the right track with PlanMaryland, as he and his staff are working to develop a strategic development plan to accommodate the million-plus people that will move into our state in the future ("High cost of sprawl should not be ignored," Sept. 23). The Maryland Department of Planning has taken on heroic leadership to pull departments together and prudently plan so that Maryland stays attractive for new businesses and keeps those already here thriving, so that residents have access to transportation to take them to work, so that its bridges and roads can be repaired when necessary, so that we have money in our coffers to build schools, roads and provide water and sewer systems to accommodate new residents, so that we are able to maintain adequate emergency services, and so that we have sufficient land to grow local healthy food for our people.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
Twenty-two-year-old Elkridge resident Roger Buckley recalls U.S. 1 as cluttered with "lots of old, sleazy motels, liquor stores and fast-food restaurants. " The main drag near his childhood home was run-down, but it had its advantages. Buckley remembers fondly a vacant home with an empty swimming pool that he and his friends used as a skate park; it was just off the busy corridor, near his job at Neu-Valley Nurseries. The home has since been torn down and now the buzz of power tools can be heard as construction workers install windows in the new four-story townhomes at Elkridge Crossing.
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