Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGrowth Management
IN THE NEWS

Growth Management

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | April 30, 1995
Howard County's experiment with growth management is dTC approximately three years old and showing signs of success.It is so successful, in fact, that the County Council is poised to consider only minor changes to the adequate public facilities legislation approved in 1992, which placed a cap on the number of housing units that can be constructed each year.Under the current law, a formula determines the extent to which the county can absorb new development, primarily by looking at its impact on elementary schools.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | November 6, 2006
On the western edge of downtown Baltimore, boarded-up rowhouses and vacant lots define Poppleton, a once-vibrant inner-city neighborhood on the verge of a radical transformation. By next year, demolition is to begin on hundreds of vacant homes there to make way for a new $300 million community of single-family homes, townhouses and apartments. Poppleton's redevelopment is a priority of both Mayor Martin O'Malley and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. The project illustrates the similarities and differences in how the two contenders for governor have attempted to manage Maryland's burgeoning growth.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | February 22, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Some delegates held their noses yesterday as they helped move the governor's watered-down growth management bill to the House floor during an emotionally charged committee meeting.A handful of delegates made an unsuccessful attempt to include sanctions against counties that don't manage development properly. After their amendments failed, they "reluctantly" supported the bill even though they said it does little to accomplish its goal of stopping suburban sprawl.The House Environmental Matters Committee passed the Economic Growth and Resource Act by a 19-3 margin.
NEWS
September 10, 2006
Commissioners deserve re-election How often can one say that their elected officials kept their campaign promises? We in Carroll County are finally fortunate to say that about our three current Commissioners - Julia Walsh Gouge, Dean L. Minnich and Perry L. Jones Jr. They ran in 2002 on a platform of managing growth; enhancing cooperation with the towns; providing a more open government; unifying a divided county staff; and trying to keep taxes as...
NEWS
April 3, 1996
WORK ON Carroll County's growth management ordinance is moving ahead in spite of the development community's expressions of alarm. Developers, home builders, real estate agents and others who make a living from construction would suffer some hardship from the proposed 20-month ban on new subdivision approvals. But suggesting that the local economy will go into a tailspin is nothing but hyperbole.Much of the county's income derives from residents who work outside the county; 60 percent of Carroll countians commute to other jurisdictions to work.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | October 3, 1990
In a rare show of solidarity, citizens and developers Monday night called for the County Council to wait six months before imposing new growth controls in the Odenton Town Center Growth Management Area.The standing-room-only crowd that packed the council chambers Monday night has Councilman David G. Boschert, D-Crownsville, on its side.Boschert, arguing that a deal to bring a MARC train station to town center could fall through if the Odenton growth management plan is approved now, introduced a bill that would delay controls on the entire 2.5-square-mile parcel for six months.
NEWS
November 19, 1995
THE STATE'S approval of the use of ground water for the first 600 homes in a huge development along the Potomac River in Charles County begins a process that will likely lead to construction of 4,600 homes, a big commercial complex and a golf course over nearly 3.5 square miles.That is why a broad coalition of environmental groups and homeowners has pitched a major battle over this first stage of the Chapman's Landing development, one that underlines the limits of the state's Growth Management Act.While purporting to offer statewide and regional evaluation of growth areas, the law now appears to accede to the plans of individual counties.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | November 6, 2006
On the western edge of downtown Baltimore, boarded-up rowhouses and vacant lots define Poppleton, a once-vibrant inner-city neighborhood on the verge of a radical transformation. By next year, demolition is to begin on hundreds of vacant homes there to make way for a new $300 million community of single-family homes, townhouses and apartments. Poppleton's redevelopment is a priority of both Mayor Martin O'Malley and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. The project illustrates the similarities and differences in how the two contenders for governor have attempted to manage Maryland's burgeoning growth.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | February 17, 1992
A year after failing to waltz a bold growth-management bill through the General Assembly, the Schaefer administration is back, singing a softer tune and dancing with different partners.The administration has won over its enemies while disappointing old friends with a drastically revised measure that would let counties decide where new development should go. It also would let local officials say how, or whether, to protect streams, steep slopes and rare plants and animals from bulldozers.The bill, which gets its first hearing in Annapolis today, has the solid backing of builders, bankers, farmers and county officials, who succeeded in getting last year's measure shelved for summer study.
NEWS
January 10, 1997
THE BALTIMORE COUNTY Chamber of Commerce's whining about Gov. Parris N. Glendening's "smart growth" plan sounds awfully familiar.We heard the same arguments 20 years ago when former Baltimore County Executive Theodore G. Venetoulis came up with a plan to protect rural land by channeling development to designated growth areas.Then, as now, they predicted disaster. The plan was a ploy to stop growth altogether. It would reduce Baltimore County's supply of developable land to pathetic proportions.
NEWS
January 8, 2006
THE ISSUE: -- What are the top concerns facing Howard County as 2006 begins? Growth management top concern for 2006 Growth management is the top concern facing Howard County in 2006. Attention to this concern will require strong leadership to add a dose of personal responsibility to balance the county's preference for personal freedoms. Rampant, unfettered growth of new developments threatens to exhaust county resources. Better stewardship of the land is available through simple enforcement of existing initiatives, such as the Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance (APFO)
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
The Carroll County commissioners approved yesterday a new fee for developers - this one to pay for costs associated with implementing the county's revamped adequate public facilities law. The fee was approved two days before the county's yearlong freeze on residential development is set to expire. Under the new fee, scheduled to take effect tomorrow, a developer will pay $97 per lot, in addition to existing charges associated with submitting preliminary plans for residential subdivisions.
NEWS
June 10, 2003
DURING HIS CAMPAIGN last fall, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. didn't display much enthusiasm for Maryland's groundbreaking Smart Growth efforts, but he nonetheless seemed to understand the need for growth management. And when asked, he voiced support for the overall concept. After a half-year in office, it's hard to tell whether he does favor it, particularly with his recently reported sackings of key state Smart Growth officials. If the governor truly isn't interested in carrying forward his predecessor's creation - and that seems to be the case at this point - he should take a good look at Baltimore's suburbs, where every jurisdiction is so awash in sprawl-generated problems that it has been forced to temporarily shut down development in certain areas.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
Angry residents filed complaints with the Anne Arundel County Board of Appeals yesterday in an attempt to stop a large commercial and residential development from being built within the Parole Growth Management Area near Annapolis. Annapolis Neck and Gingerville residents submitted the complaints after planning sessions Friday and Sunday. Also in attendance, although not listed on the complaints, were representatives of the Generals Highway Council of Civic Associations and Parole Growth Management Area advisory committee.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2002
Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens has approved permits for a 196,000- square-foot commercial and residential development within the Parole Growth Management Area, action some residents say violates a promise she made to hold off on building permits until design standards for the area had been set. The firm that is building the development - which includes two restaurants, two one-story office buildings, a three-story office building, a...
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2002
A schoolteacher, a recycling consultant, a doctor, several lawyers, community activists and a Department of the Interior bird bander are among the candidates vying for seven Harford County Council seats. For the first time, voters will elect members by districts, except for the council president, whose seat will still be chosen at large. Development is the key issue on voters' minds this election, many candidates said. Several of those running propose using an impact fee, a financial assessment charged developers to help pay for infrastructure improvements, especially for schools.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2004
The Carroll County commissioners approved yesterday a new fee for developers - this one to pay for costs associated with implementing the county's revamped adequate public facilities law. The fee was approved two days before the county's yearlong freeze on residential development is set to expire. Under the new fee, scheduled to take effect tomorrow, a developer will pay $97 per lot, in addition to existing charges associated with submitting preliminary plans for residential subdivisions.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
The Greater Annapolis Chamber of Commerce recently released a statement detailing its position on the Year 2020 Panel and the efforts of Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the Maryland Commission on Growth toaddress growth management.Although the Chamber praised the governor's and commission's efforts, it suggested that consideration of specific growth management legislation should be deferred to allow for additional consideration of regional issues.The chamber's release stated that such issues should be addressedwith the involvement of government officials and planners, and that more flexibility should be given to local jurisdictions to address the objectives of the commission.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
When Jim Holt answered the phone a few minutes before midnight May 6, he expected to hear that he'd been elected mayor of Mount Airy. Instead, he was told that election officials had declared his opponent the winner by 181 votes -- after discarding more than 250 write-in ballots that said only "Holt." Now, however, he is about to be sworn in as mayor of the Carroll County town. And though he was initially reluctant to support the court challenge that reversed the election results, he said he will waste no time pushing the reform ideas that got him elected.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2002
After months of bickering with Carroll's commissioners over growth management, several town officials have drafted a plan to stem sprawl throughout the county - and they're marshaling support from their colleagues. Even as the commissioners worked yesterday to revise the county's growth-management law, one town councilman was circulating a letter calling for stronger action from the county. Frank Johnson, president of the Mount Airy Town Council, drafted the letter, which lists six measures to control growth.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.