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Growth Controls

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NEWS
November 24, 1991
The Schaefer administration has heeded the admonitions of local county officials and developers to go slow on drawing up new growth controls for Maryland. While this move doesn't please environmentalists, it could set the stage for broader, cooperative action in later years by state and local governments to encourage compact, efficient use of Maryland's remaining open spaces.Last spring, Gov. William Donald Schaefer learned a bitter lesson about land-use control proposals: without the active support of county governments, such efforts are doomed.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
The Baltimore County Council member from Middle River said Thursday that she is opposed to allowing a riverfront housing development on conservation land in her district, which would be the largest project ever outside a long-standing growth-control boundary. Cathy Bevins said she plans to vote against a zoning change on farm and wooded land along Bird River in Middle River that was opposed by the county's environmental agency, local preservationists and most neighbors. The requested change would allow hundreds of houses to be built on land where three homes are now allowed.
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NEWS
June 11, 1991
Phase Two of the battle over statewide growth controls begins this summer when legislative committees, at the request of their presiding officers, begin a two-year study of land-use methods to safeguard the environment surrounding the Chesapeake Bay.Let's hope the second phase goes more smoothly than the first. While the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region -- better known as the 2020 commission -- made a strong case for reining-in rampant growth over the next 30 years, its recommendations proved too much for the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
Baltimore County planners want to allow hundreds of houses on waterfront conservation land along the Bird River in Middle River, over the strong objections of environmental regulators. Some county officials say a proposal for up to 400 homes where only three are now allowed would defeat the purpose of multimillion-dollar public investments in natural resource protection and would represent an unprecedented expansion into an area where the county has restricted growth since 1967. Joseph Stamato, owner of Verus Development LLC, the company that wants to develop the site, said "we're protecting the land" by using only about half of the 292 acres of woods and fields.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | October 28, 1990
"Republican" may no longer be a bad word in District 13-B, which includes southern and eastern Howard County, but you won't find that party affiliation in Marty Madden's campaign literature.Madden, 41, a Clarksville insurance agent, and his fellow Republican contender, John S. Morgan, 26, an engineer at Applied Physics Laboratory, have emerged as two of the GOP's most likely hopes for snatching a seat away from entrenched Democrats in the Nov. 6 general election. Both are competing for the two seats open in the district.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | December 11, 1991
Phil Snader worries that the value of his family's farmland will be reduced by a state-mandated program to control suburban sprawl."Our biggest concern is equity," he said. "I'm so afraid I'm not going to have loan power if I want to expand my business in the future."I'm also afraid about property rights. Where is it going to stop?" said Snader, who grows fruit, vegetables and grains outside New Windsor.Farmers across the state are concerned that proposed legislation to control growth, known as the 2020 bill, will hinder their ability to farm and rob them of their equity.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1997
The county commissioners will meet with their planning director at 2 p.m. tomorrow to talk about how to respond to the widespread condemnation of two key elements in Carroll's proposed adequate-facilities law.Nineteen of the 20 people who spoke at a crowded public hearing Wednesday opposed the growth-control measure as drafted, saying it would ruin small builders and spread economic chaos beyond Carroll's building industry.The only person to support the proposal during the 84-minute hearing, Sykesville activist Vincent DiPietro, appeared to do so halfheartedly.
NEWS
September 30, 2008
With so many signs of its continued decline and the expectations of 1 million more people living near its shores in the next 20 years to add to its woes, the Chesapeake Bay is more in peril today than ever. But just because the task of protecting Maryland's most precious natural resource is difficult does not mean it's time to give up hope or abandon the effort. If there is a thread that might connect - and correct- the various sources of pollution, from failing backyard septic tanks to storm-water runoff and excessive shoreline development, it's the need for more stringent land-use planning.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | December 18, 2008
Few issues in Howard County are as complicated and contentious as affordable-housing policy and growth-management controls. A new County Council bill appears to renew a clash between the two. The tussle erupted at a council public hearing Monday night, but in some ways it echoed past debates. Until now, local lawmakers have been reluctant to relax growth-management laws to allow county-required affordable housing to be built faster. In July, the council sharply restricted an Ulman administration bill that also sought to bend growth controls to speed redevelopment along U.S. 1 - another county priority that includes developments that incorporate lower-priced housing.
NEWS
January 5, 1991
Howard County, among the most vocal opponents of statewide growth controls, continues to make the best case for uniformity. Back in October, a stymied county council passed the job of coming up with a workable adequate facilities ordinance onto the newly sworn-in council members. The incentive for the new council to do something is an unpopular cap on building permits that remains in place until the council comes up with a plan forcing builders to help shoulder infrastructure costs in areas plagued by overcrowded schools and traffic gridlock.
NEWS
Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley's PlanMaryland, which has become the subject of bitter opposition in parts of rural Maryland, is now official state policy for managing growth. At a ceremony that included two of his Democratic predecessors, O'Malley formally accepted the plan, which had gone through two draft versions before being adopted. The plan has been decried by conservative county officials and Republican legislators as a usurpation of local power over land use, but O'Malley defended it Monday as a framework for making wise decisions about where the state should invest in capital projects.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | December 18, 2008
Few issues in Howard County are as complicated and contentious as affordable-housing policy and growth-management controls. A new County Council bill appears to renew a clash between the two. The tussle erupted at a council public hearing Monday night, but in some ways it echoed past debates. Until now, local lawmakers have been reluctant to relax growth-management laws to allow county-required affordable housing to be built faster. In July, the council sharply restricted an Ulman administration bill that also sought to bend growth controls to speed redevelopment along U.S. 1 - another county priority that includes developments that incorporate lower-priced housing.
NEWS
September 30, 2008
With so many signs of its continued decline and the expectations of 1 million more people living near its shores in the next 20 years to add to its woes, the Chesapeake Bay is more in peril today than ever. But just because the task of protecting Maryland's most precious natural resource is difficult does not mean it's time to give up hope or abandon the effort. If there is a thread that might connect - and correct- the various sources of pollution, from failing backyard septic tanks to storm-water runoff and excessive shoreline development, it's the need for more stringent land-use planning.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
Concerns over whether speeding up development would strain public services could delay a County Council vote on a bill to double the number of new homes allowed annually in the U.S. 1 corridor. During a session this week, the council discussed tabling an Ulman administration bill for a month when it comes up for a vote at Monday night's council meeting. The measure would make available up to 250 housing allocations per year from future years for projects along U.S. 1. The "borrowed" allocation would be added to the 250 a year that are available for projects in the area.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | March 12, 2008
In a setback for the state's efforts to manage growth, the Maryland Court of Appeals has upheld Allegany County's approval of a 4,300-home development in a rural area of mountainous Western Maryland. The state's highest court declared that Maryland law does not require local governments to stick to their master plans or state growth-management policies in making development decisions. "Why bother to have a plan at all?" asked an exasperated Dru Schmidt-Perkins, executive director of 1000 Friends of Maryland.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | January 28, 2007
Though an effort to tighten a law aimed at limiting residential construction near crowded schools was defeated recently, a less-restrictive proposal is expected to come before the County Council next month. The law - known as the adequate facilities ordinance - was enacted in 1991 to prevent residential construction in areas with crowded schools. But it allows proposed development to proceed if a nearby school's enrollment has not exceeded 105 percent of capacity and if relief - in the form of a new or expanded school - is planned for the near future.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2003
Six months after they were elected on promises to limit growth, the Carroll commissioners appear set to take a first step today to slow development in the Baltimore metropolitan area's fastest-growing county. The commissioners are to vote on two proposals that would freeze significant portions of the county's residential and commercial growth for the next year. And although the county's building industry has lambasted the proposed freezes at a series of meetings over the past six weeks, the commissioners say they have no plans to turn back from the aggressive policies their planning officials have recommended.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1997
The intersection of Routes 32 and 26, the crossroads of Carroll's fastest-growth area, will fail within five years, a county-commissioned traffic study reports.Philip J. Rovang, county planning director, said he had expected the report's findings and predicted that unless Route 32 is widened, all the South Carroll intersections along it also will fail by 2002. But Rovang remains optimistic about a solution to the traffic woes."Both the staff and the community are looking at viable solutions," Rovang said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
An Elkridge woman will not be able to subdivide and sell one lot of her Montgomery Road property, the Howard County Council decided last night. "In this case, I just don't believe all her options have been exhausted," said Councilman Christopher J. Merdon, an Elkridge Republican. Marjorie Gonce, who will turn 80 this year, petitioned the council to grant her an exemption to county growth controls, which dictate the number of homes that can be built each year. Under current restrictions, she would have to wait until 2009 to subdivide about a half-acre of her 5-acre tract.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
Saying they have created a more cooperative atmosphere within county government, the Carroll County commissioners outlined yesterday their accomplishments in their first year in office, which included fostering an era of open government and taking steps to control residential growth. At the same time, the three commissioners said the county faces challenges in finding ways to pay for an increased demand in services as the county continues to grow. Speaking before 200 people in their annual State of the County speeches, the commissioners said federal and state requirements, including the No Child Left Behind Act and the implementation of all-day kindergarten, have placed a heavy burden on county finances.
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