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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1997
Preservation of Baltimore County's farmland hinges on redistributing development rights and creating new village centers, according to a group helping to draft a county master plan.In a preliminary report approved last night, the committee appointed by the county Planning Office calls for a program that would allow farmers to sell development rights to builders who could use them to increase the housing density in designated growth areas.Such programs exist in about a dozen Maryland jurisdictions, including Montgomery, Howard and Carroll counties.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 16, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malley's proposal to rein in development using septic systems took a step forward Friday as a Senate committee approved it. The Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee voted 7 to 4 for the bill, despite objections from rural lawmakers, my collegue Mike Dresser reports in the Maryland Politics Blog . The septics bill is one of the first pieces of O'Mallely's legislative agenda to progress this far and the...
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NEWS
April 2, 2007
Where do schools fit into the mix of Maryland's relatively progressive stand on Smart Growth? It's a somewhat fluid and evolving process. And amid growing concerns about longer commutes to school and increased distances between schools and the communities they serve, Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration should offer more incentives to ensure that schools are located in planned growth areas throughout the state. The state's 1997 Smart Growth law limits state spending on roads, utilities and similar services to existing cities and towns or to specific areas designated for growth, usually those already served by public water and sewer.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 14, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley appealed to lawmakers Tuesday to adopt his "moderate" and "reasonable" proposal to curb development on septic systems, warning that unless sprawl is reined in the state's "Christmas future" would include loss of farmland and forests and a lifeless Chesapeake Bay. As expected, his bill, SB236 , has drawn flak from developers and some rural politicians who charge it would stifle growth and cripple local economies.  But...
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2001
Despite Gov. Parris N. Glendening's Smart Growth campaign to slow suburban sprawl, a pair of studies finds that every county but one in the Baltimore region projects significant development outside of designated growth areas. Unless things change, each of Baltimore's five suburban counties could lose at least 10,000 acres of farms and forests over the next two decades, warn the studies by the Baltimore Regional Partnership and 1000 Friends of Maryland. The groups, representing environmental and civic interests, are to release their studies today.
NEWS
May 4, 2003
WHAT DEFINES a plot of land on which new housing would be allowed and desirable? How many of these potential lots are available in the Baltimore region's designated growth areas? And are there enough such plots in these growth areas to meet the region's projected housing growth over the next 20 years? Those technical questions are at the core of a high-stakes debate in regional planning, building and political circles, one that could emerge as a full-blown legislative fight. Quietly bubbling behind the scenes, it's a highly fractious debate because the outcome will determine if new housing scatters across the region or fills in developed areas around Baltimore.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2007
It's nearly impossible to tell how effective Maryland's 10-year-old Smart Growth law has been at curbing sprawl because state agencies haven't kept track of where their spending goes, as the law requires, a new study finds. The study, to be published today by the National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education at the University of Maryland, says that officials through two administrations did a poor job of monitoring whether state funds for building roads, sewers and other public improvements were spent in designated growth areas, as the law intended.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 16, 2012
Gov.Martin O'Malley's proposal to rein in development using septic systems took a step forward Friday as a Senate committee approved it. The Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee voted 7 to 4 for the bill, despite objections from rural lawmakers, my collegue Mike Dresser reports in the Maryland Politics Blog . The septics bill is one of the first pieces of O'Mallely's legislative agenda to progress this far and the...
NEWS
December 12, 1990
The ink is barely dry on the draft report from the governor's commission on growth, and already what should have been a debate over growth management has turned into a turf war, with Harford County Executive Eileen Rehrmann and Howard County Executive Chuck Ecker charging the state with trying to take away local control of land-use planning. Maybe so, but we ask, what's wrong with that?Development is no more an isolated county problem than air or water pollution or transportation -- none of which stops at geographical boundaries.
NEWS
July 25, 2000
HERE'S a telling statistic: Of the more than 600 pending requests in Baltimore County's quadrennial comprehensive rezoning process before the council, more than 70 percent call for down-zoning. Seems like folks from Worthington Valley to Westerlee are bent upon thinning out the residential housing density in the county. Why? Because rapid growth in communities such as Owings Mills and Reisterstown has produced a litany of problems: traffic congestion, crowded schools, loss of open space and environmental degradation.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley's broad strategy to revamp land development rules across Maryland met harsh criticism Friday, as local officials worried that the governor's proposal would interfere with their ability to plan and pay for schools, roads and housing. In a discussion with local leaders at a Maryland Association of Counties conference, the Democratic governor sought to sell his new program, which has been in the works for three years. He said it would protect farms and woodlands, and would designate targeted growth areas - saving the state billions by concentrating development in areas already served by roads, sewers and other infrastructure.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,chris.guy@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
County Councilman Ronald C. Dillon Jr. has always called Anne Arundel's method for counting school enrollment "this crazy formula." This week, the Pasadena Republican and County Executive John R. Leopold are sponsoring retooled legislation aimed at straightening a tangle of rules that some complain has stymied growth in areas designed to handle it, and has instead encouraged development in older communities in the northern part of the county. Dillon, who unsuccessfully sponsored a similar proposal in the spring, says changes are "long overdue" in how school populations are projected for the purpose of the county's adequate facilities law. "It's going to give us a much more accurate picture of what's the reality at our schools," he said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | August 20, 2008
After nearly two years of work, Harford County officials say they have drawn up a blueprint to guide growth for decades to come. The 800-page document, introduced to the Harford County Council last night, is designed to preserve farmland, direct growth to established areas and set the standards of development. The zoning code bill includes the first substantial changes to land-use regulations in a quarter-century - or longer, if, as one official said, the 1982 rewrite was simply a rewording of a 1957 code.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | August 3, 2008
Red, the color code for development, has proliferated on planning maps of Maryland since the 1970s. And if current trends continue, it will almost eliminate by 2030 the green spaces on maps of the state's central area and along the Chesapeake Bay, according to organizers of a forum on growth held in Bel Air. A presentation on growth that included a progression of redder maps was part of a Smarter Growth forum that drew more than 50 people to the Bel...
NEWS
December 27, 2007
A tourist symbol intended to attract visitors to rural, historic and uncluttered parts of Maryland has become an unintended indicator of how poorly state and local officials have protected such vistas. Black-eyed Susan road signs, which since 1988 have signaled a soothing entry into Maryland's back country, were removed this year from 250 miles of road deemed to no longer fit the designation of "scenic byways," according to The Sun's Julie Scharper. Nearly 2,500 miles of scenic byways remain - but not for long, if unregulated sprawl keeps replacing horse farms with mini-mansions and forests with big-box storage facilities.
NEWS
December 23, 2007
Sprawl has spoiled many scenic byways There are many ways to assess or measure how smart our growth is - but losing a scenic byway designation because of growth is a tangible one ("Byways dwindle as growth comes in," Dec. 16). For the most part, it is sprawl, not Smart Growth, that has led to the loss of the scenic byway designations The Sun discussed. Such growth is typified by residential development on large lots, outside planned growth areas, with individual well and septic systems.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Thomas W. Waldron contributed to this article | January 28, 1997
Gov. Parris N. Glendening formally proposed yesterday an ambitious plan to slow sprawl development that has gobbled uphuge tracts of land, clogged highways, and left cities, towns and older suburban neighborhoods to decay.Legislation submitted last night to the General Assembly would rein in such growth by directing much of the state's spending on infrastructure to existing population centers.Under the proposal, developers who build near cities or towns are more likely to see the state pay to upgrade access roads.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Dana Hedgpeth and Craig Timberg and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff | April 13, 1997
Gov. Parris N. Glendening's Smart Growth plan -- once feared as the Big Bad Wolf of state growth control by sprawling suburban counties such as Howard -- has emerged from the General Assembly so weakened that it now elicits few complaints from county officials."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | October 4, 2007
The architect of Maryland's decade-old Smart Growth policy spoke up for it yesterday, arguing that despite its shortcomings at curbing suburban sprawl it has helped revitalize dying downtowns across the state and kick-started a national movement to build more transit-oriented, walkable communities. Speaking in Annapolis at a conference reviewing the growth-management law he crafted, former Gov. Parris N. Glendening acknowledged that a few metropolitan areas and states such as Oregon and Seattle have had more success than has Maryland at reining in low-density development.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2007
It's nearly impossible to tell how effective Maryland's 10-year-old Smart Growth law has been at curbing sprawl because state agencies haven't kept track of where their spending goes, as the law requires, a new study finds. The study, to be published today by the National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education at the University of Maryland, says that officials through two administrations did a poor job of monitoring whether state funds for building roads, sewers and other public improvements were spent in designated growth areas, as the law intended.
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