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Growth And Development

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NEWS
October 18, 1998
Anne Arundel County has the best plan in the state for managing growth and development, and county officials will be honored during an awards ceremony at the end of the month.The Maryland Chapter of the American Planning Association announced Friday that Anne Arundel won a statewide competition of comprehensive land-use plans. The awards ceremony will be held at Benjamin Banneker Historical Park in Catonsville on Oct. 28.Anne Arundel's plan includes 120 recommendations on how to manage growth, conserve the environment and meet residents' educational and recreational needs.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 7, 2011
Donald Vincent Williams, the retired Baltimore City schools director of physical education, died of cancer Dec. 26 at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 70 and lived in Woodlawn. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Turners Station, he was a 1960 graduate of Sollers Point Junior-Senior High School. He earned a bachelor's degree at what is now the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and belonged to the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity. He played baseball and ran track.
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NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
An international team of growth and development experts that has toured southern Anne Arundel County for the past week told residents last night that there is both good news and cause for concern for the area's future."
NEWS
By Tim Wheeler and Tim Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | October 13, 2009
Some of us have a hard time looking beyond today. But when it comes to thinking about growth and development - perennial hot topics virtually everywhere - what if we took a longer view? What do we want our communities to look like? Not next year, or 10 or even 20 years from now. A century from now. That's what nearly 100 businesses, civic and environmental groups, government agencies and hundreds of citizens have done in the region bordering Washington's Puget Sound. Starting four years ago, the participants hammered out the "Cascade Agenda," a call to conserve working forests, farmlands, shorelines, parks and natural areas while also making cities and towns attractive places to live, work and raise families.
NEWS
November 1, 2006
ISSUE--Growth and development have emerged as the top issue in this fall's elections, particularly in Anne Arundel County as it prepares for 20,000 new jobs coming to Fort Meade in the next five years. Some voters have urged candidates to seek a temporary building ban along Route 3, several incumbents have vowed to raise developers' impact fees, and at least one office-seeker wants to ban big-box retail stores in South County. YOUR VIEW--Do you believe candidates' pledges to manage growth are sincere or realistic?
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2000
A new computerized map to aid emergency services in Carroll County was to have been done a year ago, but it has repeatedly been delayed by county officials as they try to figure out what information should be included. The state-funded, $540,000 project was originally due for completion in January last year. County officials have delayed final payment to a Baltimore company that was hired in fall 1998 to revise the map. The document is also expected to help the county plan growth and development.
NEWS
November 5, 2006
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE -- Growth and development have emerged as the top issue in this fall's elections, particularly in Anne Arundel County as it prepares for 20,000 new jobs coming to Fort Meade in the next five years. Some voters have urged candidates to seek a temporary building ban along Route 3, several incumbents have vowed to raise developers' impact fees, and at least one office-seeker wants to ban big-box retail stores in South County. Do you believe candidates' pledges to manage growth are sincere or realistic?
NEWS
July 10, 2005
THE ISSUE: Noting an expected surge in traffic in coming years, a panel has recommended the revival of a proposed bypass around Westminster, a $500 million project scrapped seven years ago by Gov. Parris N. Glendening as contrary to his Smart Growth anti-sprawl campaign. The panel, appointed by the Carroll County commissioners, unveiled the plan for an eight-mile road north of Route 140 in a report that includes details of a four-lane divided highway that would run from Leidy Road to Hughes Shop Road in the county seat.
NEWS
July 29, 1996
THE CONSENSUS in Harford County after the last election was that developers had bought the victors -- lock, stock and barrel. Builders put up billboards for their chosen candidates, while a vocal growth-control candidate got trounced.But a funny thing happened when the builders came to collect: The County Council and County Executive Eileen Rehrmann slammed the door on them. Siding with Ms. Rehrmann, the council earlier this month rejected a last-minute proposal by builders to extend Harford's growth area to a rural section called Creswell.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2007
Most Marylanders believe that development and growth are occurring too rapidly and are affecting their communities negatively, according to a poll released yesterday. The telephone poll, a random sample of 1,000 registered voters surveyed by 1000 Friends of Maryland, an anti-sprawl group, found that most respondents want the state to take a stronger role in coordinating and steering growth to existing communities. Respondents listed traffic congestion as one of their top concerns, and a majority supported spending more on public transit even if it meant spending less on improving roads.
NEWS
February 6, 2009
Striking a balance on 'green agenda' The Baltimore Sun's editorial "The green agenda" (Feb. 2) properly lauds Gov. Martin O'Malley's "green" commitments, from fully funding Program Open Space to reducing greenhouse gases. The editorial also claims that his current legislative proposals don't go far enough to "steer counties and towns in a responsible direction" to control growth. However, a task force worked through 2008 to make recommendations on land use, growth and development to the governor and General Assembly, and its initial recommendations formed the basis for the governor's proposals.
NEWS
By Jaquelyn Magness Seneschal and James Noonan | January 1, 2009
Most Marylanders remain blissfully unaware of how growth and development occur around them or affect their daily choices. They probably don't know about last summer's round of "listening sessions" sponsored by the Maryland Department of Planning, or the draft report from the Task Force on the Future for Growth and Development in Maryland - or that the General Assembly expects to see legislation this year to "revise and re-energize" Maryland's Smart Growth...
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN REPORTER | November 28, 2007
Who'd have expected that one of the biggest housing developments proposed in Maryland in years would be in rural, mountainous Allegany County, where the population has been dwindling since the factory economy collapsed 30-some years ago? But that's just what has happened, since a Columbia-based developer offered to build a 4,300-home community, along with some stores, a riding stable and trails on scenic U.S. 40, hard by Green Ridge State Forest. And, perhaps even more surprising, it has drawn fierce opposition - from people who say the county failed to follow its own growth plan in approving the process.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2007
Most Marylanders believe that development and growth are occurring too rapidly and are affecting their communities negatively, according to a poll released yesterday. The telephone poll, a random sample of 1,000 registered voters surveyed by 1000 Friends of Maryland, an anti-sprawl group, found that most respondents want the state to take a stronger role in coordinating and steering growth to existing communities. Respondents listed traffic congestion as one of their top concerns, and a majority supported spending more on public transit even if it meant spending less on improving roads.
NEWS
November 5, 2006
LAST WEEK'S ISSUE -- Growth and development have emerged as the top issue in this fall's elections, particularly in Anne Arundel County as it prepares for 20,000 new jobs coming to Fort Meade in the next five years. Some voters have urged candidates to seek a temporary building ban along Route 3, several incumbents have vowed to raise developers' impact fees, and at least one office-seeker wants to ban big-box retail stores in South County. Do you believe candidates' pledges to manage growth are sincere or realistic?
NEWS
November 1, 2006
ISSUE--Growth and development have emerged as the top issue in this fall's elections, particularly in Anne Arundel County as it prepares for 20,000 new jobs coming to Fort Meade in the next five years. Some voters have urged candidates to seek a temporary building ban along Route 3, several incumbents have vowed to raise developers' impact fees, and at least one office-seeker wants to ban big-box retail stores in South County. YOUR VIEW--Do you believe candidates' pledges to manage growth are sincere or realistic?
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2000
A new computerized map to aid emergency services in Carroll County was to have been done a year ago, but it has repeatedly been delayed by county officials as they try to figure out what information should be included. The state-funded, $540,000 project was originally due for completion in January last year. County officials have delayed final payment to a Baltimore company that was hired in fall 1998 to revise the map. The document is also expected to help the county plan growth and development.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1998
In a fishing village that has remained largely unchanged for three generations, dozens of bureaucrats, growth and development experts and frustrated Anne Arundel residents debated sprawl, subdivisions and the death of small-town, rural living.The round table on growth and development yesterday was part of a weeklong "Countryside Exchange," in which experts from around the United States and Europe tour the southern portion of Arundel to provide an outside perspective on how to combine growth with historic and ecological preservation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | September 15, 2006
In Howard County's hotly contested campaign for county executive, image may be everything. That is why one candidate wants to be seen as the champion for residents resentful of congestion, while another portrays himself as a battler for maintaining the county's top-flight public services. The flip side is their efforts to define each other in negative ways with images such as the developers' best friend or the one who cuts budgets for schools, libraries, parks and public safety. "Growth and development are the No. 1 issue," said County Council Chairman Christopher J. Merdon, the Republican nominee for executive who is trying to capitalize on his vote against the unpopular Comp Lite rezoning bill.
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