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By Dan Rodricks | July 21, 2010
    Dan Rodricks' article on housing growth vs. sustainability ("Is more growth always good?" July 11) was right on target.  America's "growth spurt" in the last half of the 20th century is like that of a teenager -- expected, but awkward, unbalanced and stressful.      When teenagers become adults the nature of "growth" must change.  An adult can't keep growing taller and fatter forever.  Hopefully, he grows and develops in ways that make him smarter, stronger and healthier.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The 2014-2015 season of Live Arts Maryland's Annapolis Chorale and Annapolis Chamber Orchestra promises to be a celebration of music director J. Ernest Green's 30 years with the organization. Green has enriched Anne Arundel County's cultural scene by delivering extraordinary music to Annapolis, and Live Arts has even more to celebrate this year with the opening of the renovated theater at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. Green conducted the first performance at the unveiling celebration Sept.
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NEWS
By Jacob Hacker and Nate Loewentheil | August 12, 2013
Everyone has heard that tackling poverty and inequality is bad for the economy. This is the dilemma that economist Arthur Okun, writing in the 1970s, called "The Big Trade-Off" - equality and efficiency are at odds. Yet more and more research and real-world experience suggest just the opposite. If there is a "Big Trade-Off," it is not between equality and efficiency. It is between policies that enrich the most fortunate and a broader distribution of opportunity that helps all Americans.
NEWS
By Matthew Wellington and Robert S. Lawrence | October 1, 2014
Science tells us that the overuse of antibiotics is leading to "super bugs," bacteria that are increasingly difficult if not impossible to kill with antibiotics. The biggest users — and arguably abusers — of antibiotics are large-scale industrial farms. More than 70 percent of antibiotics are used on livestock and poultry, and at many facilities, antibiotics are fed to animals that aren't sick. This enables the animals to grow faster and lets them stay healthy despite cramped, confined quarters where bacteria abound.
NEWS
December 8, 2013
The Sun's editorial regarding the slow progress in clean up the Chesapeake Bay (" State of the Chesapeake," Dec. 5) made some excellent points, but it missed an important one. Since serious efforts at reducing the nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment entering the bay began a few decades ago, several million more people have been added to the bay's watershed. And it is people - all of us - who are the ultimate cause of the bay's problems. Against this head wind of population and development, the fact that we have made any progress at all should be a cause for optimism that we are heading in the right direction.
NEWS
December 20, 1991
The brouhaha over growth control bubbling up in Harford County puts the lie to the notion that the suburbs are insulated from what used to be called "urban problems." The county is struggling with the inevitable fallout of the middle-class flight from the city, and then from the closer-in metropolitan communities. Unbridled growth puts a tremendous, and costly, burden on local governments, which must provide adequate infrastructure.But it is hardly that simple. Growth, in fact, is an enormously explosive issue for politicians.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | January 20, 2013
There is an old but rejuvenated movement in the country these days. It's a far-left take on Keynesian economics: a school of thought intent on raising taxes and expanding the public sector - as a way to jump-start the economy. Yes, you read that correctly. The progressive intelligentsia (with a recent assist by the Congressional Research Service) are all hot and excited by the prospect of higher taxes on upper-income taxpayers, the better to spur economic growth. The model is supposed to be the Clinton era, wherein income tax hikes coincided with strong economic growth, a surging stock market, and three consecutive years of a federal balanced budget.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2010
WASHINGTON - The economy is now likely expanding at just half the brisk 5.9 percent pace at which the government on Friday estimated it grew last quarter. Business spending will make up for some of a slowdown in consumer spending - but not likely enough to reduce the jobless rate much. In a fresh reading on the nation's economic standing, the Commerce Department bumped up its growth estimate for the final quarter of 2009, from a 5.7 percent growth rate estimated a month ago. It was the strongest showing in six years.
NEWS
June 5, 2013
Wise parental support and an effective education delivery system will result in excellent report cards, well prepared high school graduates and a stronger economy, right? All of that may be true if there's been good maternal and child nutrition. The first 1,000 days of each student's life, from pregnancy to age 2, are critical to brain development. The ability of an undernourished child to learn and work is much more likely to be diminished. Globally, nearly 200 million chronically malnourished children suffer serious, often irreversible, physical and cognitive damage.
NEWS
November 5, 1994
With everyone from dog catcher to U.S. senator vowing to fight crime, there's no denying the issue's resonance among voters this season. But the real angst in many suburban areas isn't about the growth of crime; in many residents' eyes, it's over the crime of too much growth.In Howard County, Republican Executive Chuck Ecker faces a vociferous challenge from Democrat Susan Gray, whose single issue is attacking higher density and increased residential growth. In Harford County -- a once-rural outpost transformed dramatically in the past decade -- the County Council presidency is being sought by councilwoman Theresa Pierno, who has made a name for herself as a grassroots growth-combatant.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Richard William Parsons, a retired Baltimore County librarian who also spent nearly 50 years as a residential advocate for Towson, died of cancer Monday at his Woodbine Avenue home. He was 87. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, he was the son of Thomas Parsons, a commandant of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Laura Lyons, a homemaker. He earned a bachelor's degree in Slavic languages at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and had a master's degree in library science from McGill University.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
The Maryland Department of Transportation has been awarded $10 million in federal funding to widen a stretch of Route 175 in Anne Arundel County that is contributing to congestion around an expanding Fort Meade. The Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery or TIGER grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation will be used to widen the heavily-used corridor between Disney and Reece roads, U.S. Sens. Barbara Mikulski and Ben Cardin, both Maryland Democrats, announced Tuesday.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Many of the airplanes overhead in the Baltimore region could start looking a bit different soon, as Southwest Airlines unveiled a new logo and design for its aircraft Monday. The Dallas-based airline is the largest carrier in and out of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport in Anne Arundel County, operating more than 70 percent of the flights along with subsidiary AirTran. The new red, yellow and blue logo is in the shape of a heart, meant to convey the people-first ethos long espoused publicly by the airline, it said.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | September 3, 2014
Friday, the Labor Department is expected to report that the economy added 230,000 jobs in August. The pace has picked up a bit but is still far less than needed to reemploy all the prime aged workers displaced in the wake of the financial crisis. The jobless rate is down to 6.1 percent but that stat is deceptive. For example, one in six adult males between the ages of 25 and 54 is not working. Many don't show up in the unemployment count because they are not actively looking for a job. They spend their days cluttering park benches or watching ESPN because they are too discouraged to look for work or lack the incentive to make an effort.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State officials have abandoned plans for a rail cargo facility in an economically depressed corner of West Baltimore, amid vocal opposition from residents and diminishing political will. With the state withdrawing more than $30 million in funding, the CSX Transportation facility envisioned for the city's Morrell Park neighborhood will not be built, Maryland Transportation Secretary James T. Smith said Thursday. CSX and the port of Baltimore had been counting on using the facility to help move additional cargo.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
"Charge 'em for the lice, extra for the mice Two percent for looking in the mirror twice Here a little slice, there a little cut Three percent for sleeping with the window shut... " - "Master of the House," Les Miserables A business owner in Baltimore could be excused for feeling like he's living permanently in Monsieur Thénardier's inn from Les Miserables. On top of the highest income and property tax rates in the state, business owners here must contend with the Byzantine set of fees for what are known as "minor privileges" - everything from a table and chairs on the sidewalk outside a cafe to, rather famously, a papier mache flamingo suspended 20 feet above the ground.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | July 4, 2007
Nearly half of all Americans have high-speed Internet service at home, but the growth rate for "broadband" service is slowing sharply, and it's still uncommon among poor and rural residents, according to a new study. About 47 percent of adult Americans surveyed by the nonprofit Pew Internet & American Life Project said they have high-speed Internet service at home, up from next to nothing at the start of the decade. The rate of growth for broadband service adoption, however, was only 12 percent for the one-year period ending in March.
NEWS
February 27, 1995
Limiting the number of lots a developer can record on land records is not an effective way to control growth. In fact, the decision last week by the Carroll County Planning and Zoning Commission to restrict developers to 75 recorded lots every two years in each subdivision may actually accelerate development and sprawl -- the very problems the policy is intended to curb.By reducing the number of lots that can be recorded from the current level of 25 each quarter -- equivalent to 200 every two years -- it is easy to be lulled into a false sense that this change will slow residential growth.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Legg Mason Inc. reported Thursday its quarterly profit grew 51 percent, thanks to a strategy that has diversified the money manager's investment portfolio. The Baltimore-based company said it earned $72.2 million, or 61 cents per share, in the three months ended June 30, compared with $47.8 million, or 38 cents per share, a year earlier. Revenue for the quarter rose 4 percent to $693.9 million. While Legg Mason announced in May it had reversed a six-year outflow of client money, the recent quarter brought a net outflow of $8.2 billion, nearly all from liquid investments such as money market funds.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
The city's tourism industry grew last year, according to Visit Baltimore's annual report, with 23.9 million visitors spending more than $5 billion in 2013. The report, which was released Tuesday, found that visitors to Baltimore were up 2.6 percent from 2012, though leisure visits continue to dominate business visits by more than three to one. Tourist spending is up 2.2 percent over the same period. Hotel bookings are also on the rise, with 370 conventions, meetings and trade shows in fiscal year 2014, helping generate an economic impact of $241 million for the city.
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