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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2009
Question: The roots of my orchid are growing way out of the pot. Should I cut them off? Answer: No, wild flailing roots are business as usual for an orchid. Orchids are epiphytes which grow in tree crotches or wherever they can get purchase in the tree canopy. It's not normal for them to be confined to a pot, consequently potting medium for orchids is primarily shards of bark. When this decomposes it is too much like soil, and the roots are not happy. They may be signaling that it’s time to repot your orchid with new specialized orchid potting "soil."
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
The historic Rodgers Forge neighborhood in Towson has adopted guidelines for residents who want to install solar panels, an effort community leaders hope can strike a balance between preserving the community's architecture and embracing alternative energy. A committee of the Rodgers Forge Community Association worked for about a year to come up with the recommendations, which the full board approved in September, according to immediate past president Stu Sirota. "I think this shows that Rodgers Forge is a progressive neighborhood that cares about its history and maintaining the architectural integrity of its homes, while still being able to allow a modern and innovative green technology," Sirota said.
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NEWS
March 1, 2010
Of course traffic gets worse ("Traffic getting worse? Survey says yes," Feb 25th). Those who study population dynamics in the U.S. know that the Baltimore-Washington area has been growing very rapidly, adding roughly 70,000-90,000 people per year, for quite a few years now. For the Baltimore area, if we consider the population increase of Howard, Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Harford counties (where many car commuters reside), data available show that the population increase for the combined counties since 2000 has averaged 13,000 people per year!
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The Cincinnati Bengals have emerged as one of the top feel-good stories - on and off the field - through three games. Undefeated and atop the AFC North standings, the Bengals are the current front-runners in the division race. They're ranked first in the NFL in yards per pass and fewest sacks allowed. Their defense has allowed the fewest points in the league. Away from the field, they have received an outpouring of support for defensive tackle Devon Still and his 4-year-old daughter, Leah.
NEWS
By Jennifer S. Williams and Jennifer S. Williams,Contributing writer | April 21, 1991
"I do this because I need to dig in the soil," says Gail Barbosa, explaining why she spends weeks each spring toiling over a garden plot two miles from her King's Contrivance home.Ask other gardeners what draws them to Columbia's three community garden sites and a variety of reasons unfold. Some want truly fresh, vine-ripened produce -- "real" tomatoes top the list.Others are trying to keep down their grocery bills by growing their own vegetables. A few, including some immigrants from Southeast Asia, are growing exotic vegetables and herbs not available in stores here.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 31, 1995
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- President Clinton warned the Florida Legislature yesterday that fast-growing states could fall into a fiscal "trap" under GOP plans to convert welfare and crime-fighting programs to lump sum payments to the states.Seeking to forge a new alliance in his battle against the Republican proposals, Mr. Clinton told a legislative joint session that Congress' primary purpose in using block grant maneuvers is to save itself money.While awarding sums could generate a profit for states with stable or declining populations, it could penalize those forced to stretch the funds across a growing caseload, he said.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Marijuana growers in Maryland are getting more creative and perhaps more desperate, even willing to risk artillery fire to produce a good crop without its being detected.One "extremely clever" such effort yielded a huge harvest yesterday -- for state and federal drug agents who seized and destroyed more than 900 marijuana plants found in a highly secure "downrange" area of Aberdeen Proving Ground.The plants, representing one of the largest marijuana crops ever discovered in Maryland, had an estimated street value of more than $2 million, said Special Agent Andrew S. Manning of the FBI's Baltimore office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Shatzkin and By Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff | December 22, 2002
Growing Up Empty: The Hunger Epidemic in America, by Loretta Schwartz-Nobel. HarperCollins. 272 pages. $24.95. Twenty years ago, a young journalist named Loretta Schwartz-Nobel found what the older and more experienced among her craft had failed to illustrate -- that millions of Americans were going hungry in the richest nation in the world. The result of her work, a groundbreaking book called Starving in the Shadow of Plenty, won awards and calls to action, promises that things would change.
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | July 7, 1995
Knills' Farm Market is a growing family enterprise nourished on hard work and cooperation that has taken root in the heart of Mount Airy.The market started three years ago with vegetable sales from a wooden cart along the driveway of the Knill farm, east of Route 27 across the road from Watkins Park. Business has grown each summer, enough to warrant a permanent location visible from Ridge Road and closer to Jim and Carol Knill's farm home. The market, which opened for the growing season June 30, is a joint venture of the Knills and Jim's father, Bill Knill.
NEWS
By Denise Cowie and Denise Cowie,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 7, 2004
It's about this time of year, when ever-shorter days signal that killing frosts can't be too far off, that gardeners are apt to sigh and mutter, "I wish I had a greenhouse." If only we had a greenhouse, we figure, we could keep tender plants alive until next year, extend the fall season, get a jump on spring, and even -- maybe best of all -- create a warm, green oasis to sustain us through the winter. Now, apparently, more gardeners are making the wish a reality. "Greenhouse gardening is growing at an exponential rate," says Mike Helle of Sunshine GardenHouse, a company in Longview, Wash.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Running a medical marijuana operation could cost each grower more than $125,000 a year in fees, a sum so steep some officials believe it may shut out small businesses. Maryland's medical marijuana commission is tentatively proposing that fee for each of the 15 potential growers envisioned for the state's new program. The panel also is recommending a $40,000-a-year charge for dispensaries, according to a draft plan expected to be released for public comment Wednesday. Those license fees - atop as much as $6,000 in application fees - would finance the state's nascent medical marijuana program.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Royal Farms quietly grew over decades into one of Baltimore's most ubiquitous businesses, but last week the convenience store chain took a bigger stage. On Wednesday, the city approved a $1.25 million, five-year agreement for Royal Farms to serve as title sponsor for the Baltimore Arena, to be known starting Nov. 1 as Royal Farms Arena. The move, which comes in the midst of accelerated expansion and after years of careful branding, is a statement of bigger ambitions that simultaneously ties the retailer, headquartered in offices above one of its stores on The Avenue in Hampden, more closely to its local customers, industry watchers said "By having an arena that carries your name, you're saying, 'Not only are we the corner store, but we're the corner store in your community,' " said Jeff Lenard, vice president of strategic industry initiatives for the National Association of Convenience Stores.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
Christino Jackson Jr. has had steady work for the past seven years — mostly as a temp. Jobs working construction, building fences, or helping plumbers and electricians — all for a temporary help agency — have meant stability for the 36-year-old Baltimore resident. "I know that I'm going to have work," said Jackson, an employee of Just Temps who is trained as a mason and currently is working on a residential rehabilitation project along North Calvert and St. Paul streets.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
After three years mixing, bottling and boxing natural personal care products to be sold in local shops at their home in Annapolis, Robert and Zoe Benzinger are poised for bigger things. For the first time their company, eco-armour, will be among the exhibitors starting Wednesday at Natural Products Expo East 2014 in Baltimore, billed as the largest trade show on the East Coast devoted to goods made from ingredients found in nature treated with relatively little processing. The industry says sales of natural food for people and pets, diet supplements, and cosmetics and grooming products are growing about 8 percent a year.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2014
The tall ships - old showboats that they are - danced into Baltimore looking regal and festooned, the stateliest of guests at an affair expected to bring President Barack Obama to Baltimore. "It's a ballet, with a couple hard-rock pieces in the middle," said Mike McGeady, president of Sail Baltimore, of the intense maritime choreography used to welcome dozens of Star-Spangled Spectacular ships into the waters around Baltimore on Wednesday without disrupting commercial port trade.
NEWS
By Ellen B. Cutler | September 9, 2014
Note to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service: There are too many deer. And I say this as a softie who loves watching them wander in my yard and who has evolved gardening practices that focus on "deer-resistant" species and a philosophical outlook that accommodates inevitable damage. We've watched the deer and tossed them dried corn and old apples (yes I know feeding the wildlife is frowned upon) since we moved into this recent expansion of our smallish town that is really part of the exurbia of Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | August 6, 1992
NEW YORK -- Euphoria is a long way off, but a survey of conditions in Maryland released yesterday by the regional Federal Reserve Bank had a reassuring undercurrent of continued -- albeit slow -- growth and optimism.The survey was part of a broader "beige book" compilation of regional conditions, reported by each of the 12 regional banks to assist the Open Market Committee of the Federal Reserve Board in determining monetary policy.Nationwide conditions have been "uneven,"according to the Fed report, with manufacturing, retail sales and loan demand differing significantly by region.
NEWS
By Tim Weinfeld and Tim Weinfeld,Contributing theater critic | September 18, 1991
He demonstrates a growing sense of security and command of his roles. His bell-clear voice and flexible physical attributes make him a natural for comedy.County audiences will remember actor Roger Buchanan's excellent work as Shem in the recent Havilah-Hayes Theatre production of "Two By Two" and as Alfred Doolittle in "My Fair Lady," last year's September Song offering.Now the Westminster resident is exporting his considerable talents to Baltimore, where he is performing through September at The Spotlighters Theatre in a production of Larry Shue's farce, "The Nerd."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
- The Battle of Caulk's Field, the engagement at which the local soldiers of the Kent County militia stood up to the highly trained British Royal Navy and Marines, unfolded in the darkness of the early morning of Aug. 31, 1814. The only light came from the moon and the flashes of the troops' muskets. On Sunday, the 200th anniversary of the pivotal skirmish, historical interpreters brought the battle out into the daylight, allowing spectators to see the action that foreshadowed the defense of Fort McHenry and the eventual American victory in the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Two years ago, when the Orioles unleashed the region's pent-up baseball passion with their first playoff run in years, they did it by walking baseball's version of a tightrope. They played a lot of nail-biters - winning 29 games by just one run. They snatched 16 of 18 in extra innings. They didn't nab a wild-card playoff spot until the last week of the season. This year has been a steadier march. These O's have seen no major streaks, good or bad, but they've won six or so games out of every 10, climbing to the top of the American League East, where they've been since early July.
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