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By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Running a medical marijuana operation could cost each grower more than $125,000 a year in fees, a sum so steep some officials believe it may shut out small businesses. Maryland's medical marijuana commission is tentatively proposing that fee for each of the 15 potential growers envisioned for the state's new program. The panel also is recommending a $40,000-a-year charge for dispensaries, according to a draft plan expected to be released for public comment Wednesday. Those license fees - atop as much as $6,000 in application fees - would finance the state's nascent medical marijuana program.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
Running a medical marijuana operation could cost each grower more than $125,000 a year in fees, a sum so steep some officials believe it may shut out small businesses. Maryland's medical marijuana commission is tentatively proposing that fee for each of the 15 potential growers envisioned for the state's new program. The panel also is recommending a $40,000-a-year charge for dispensaries, according to a draft plan expected to be released for public comment Wednesday. Those license fees - atop as much as $6,000 in application fees - would finance the state's nascent medical marijuana program.
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BUSINESS
By Kate Shatzkin and Dan Fesperman and The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 1999
One thing is sure: Hank Thornes is high on Perdue. Fresh from one of the best years he's had, the 66-year-old Stockton farmer sounds like he did a decade ago, when he and his wife, Faye, were named the Salisbury company's top growers on the Delmarva Peninsula. That's when a smiling Hank Thornes appeared in ads in such publications as the Salisbury Daily Times, under the headline: "This Is Where the Real Good Money Is. " Eleven years later, the Thorneses believe it still is -- even though the newest of their five chicken houses is 20 years old. They are happy with their company, happy with chickens.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Kurt Bluemel, a nursery owner and plants man who was called the "Johnny Appleseed of ornamental grasses," died of cancer Wednesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Baldwin resident was 81. Mr. Bluemel, who propagated and popularized willowy, straight and flowing grasses, was also known as the Grass King. His grasses filled Oprah Winfrey's garden and he created gardens for industrialist Howard Head and other Maryland figures. He was a wholesale grower with nurseries in Baldwin, another on the Eastern Shore near Crisfield and a third in Florida near Orlando.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy News Service | October 6, 1991
FRESNO, Calif. -- In 1988, the Salinas-based Nunes Co. Inc. heard rumblings that organic produce could go mainstream. That spring, it began converting its iceberg lettuce to organic.But last March -- three years later -- the 9,000-acre corporation quit growing organic and went back to using man-made fertilizers and pesticides.The company was just losing too much production and too much money, said David Nunes, vice president, even on the 4 percent of its acreage devoted to organic."On a per-carton basis, it cost us 30 percent more than conventional, because yields were lower.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1999
UPPER MARLBORO -- Yesterday was payday for Southern Maryland tobacco farmers.Hundreds of growers -- bundled up in layers of work clothing to ward off a morning chill -- showed up at the opening session of the annual leaf auction at the Marlboro Tobacco Market Inc. warehouse to get a feel for how much they will be banking from a drought-damaged crop harvested in the fall.Nobody was celebrating.Prices were lower than a year ago, and there was concern that they could fall even more before the four-week sale ends.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1998
Fruit growers in Maryland say last week's cold snap killed some of the early blossoms on their apricot, peach and plum trees. And they won't rest easy until the last threat of a freeze is gone in early May.But so far, they say, thanks to a slower flowering of local trees, they have escaped the widespread damage suffered by their brethren to the south.Georgia alone has reported more than $200 million in crop losses from the freeze, including peppers, tomatoes, blueberries and half the state's peaches.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
Maryland's largest poultry company owners reacted with outrage yesterday after state officials completed new regulations that will hold the businesses responsible for water pollution caused by chicken manure. The regulations, believed to be the first of their kind in the country, will require poultry companies to verify that their growers have plans for getting rid of manure without causing polluted runoff. Such pollutants have been blamed for fish kills and are suspected of triggering toxic outbreaks of Pfiesteria in 1997.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
As state lawmakers try to get Maryland's medical marijuana program off the ground, the focus has turned to the practical matter of establishing an industry to provide the drug - and the details are proving daunting. While there is broad agreement in Annapolis that marijuana should be widely available for patients who need it, there's no consensus about how best to accomplish that end. Legislators are hearing from frustrated patients and their families who still can't get marijuana legally to treat intractable pain, seizures and other medical problems.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Chris Guy and Joel McCord and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2001
EASTON - More than 300 growers, company executives, rural politicians and farm bureau officials turned out last night to criticize the Maryland Department of the Environment over proposed regulations for getting rid of excess chicken manure. They said the proposals would further damage an industry under pressure from declining exports and the lowest poultry prices in 20 years. The new rules that would hold giant poultry processors like Salisbury-based Perdue Farms Inc. responsible for helping growers dispose of litter - a mixture of sawdust and manure - would ruin the independence of thousands of small family farmers who produce more than 300 million chickens a year on Maryland's Eastern Shore, many in attendance said.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Determined to revamp the state's defunct medical marijuana program, key state lawmakers have begun hashing out differences between the different programs approved by the Senate and the House. Del. Peter A. Hammen, a Baltimore City Democrat, said Monday he would "fully anticipate" a compromise to be found by the end of the week. At issue is how many growers would be allowed to operate in the state, and whether the patients could get marijuana directly from growers or instead through a system of independent dispensaries.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
As state lawmakers try to get Maryland's medical marijuana program off the ground, the focus has turned to the practical matter of establishing an industry to provide the drug - and the details are proving daunting. While there is broad agreement in Annapolis that marijuana should be widely available for patients who need it, there's no consensus about how best to accomplish that end. Legislators are hearing from frustrated patients and their families who still can't get marijuana legally to treat intractable pain, seizures and other medical problems.
EXPLORE
Aegis report | March 25, 2013
A Harford County farmer has been honored as a state winner in the 2012 National Corn Yield Contest, sponsored annually by the National Corn Growers Association. Harrison Rigdon, of Jarrettsville, placed first in the state in the A No-Till/Strip Till Non-Irrigated Class with a yield of 268.9818 bushels per acre. The hybrid used in the winning field was Pioneer P1395XR. Rigdon was one of 421 state winners nationwide. The 2012 contest had 8,263 entries from 46 states. Of the state winners, 18 growers - three from each of six classes - were named national winners, representing 13 states.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2013
Albert H. Ford, a retired Bendix Field Engineering Corp. executive who was a noted Maryland rosarian, died Jan. 3 of pneumonia at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 90. The son of a newspaperman and a homemaker, Albert Henry Ford was born in Atlanta and raised in Norfolk, Va., where he graduated in 1940 from Maury High School. He briefly attended Old Dominion University in Norfolk before enlisting in the Navy during World War II, where he completed flight school at the naval air station in Pensacola, Fla. Mr. Ford spent the war years as a flight instructor at various stateside naval air stations and was discharged in 1945.
NEWS
By Bob Benson | May 22, 2012
Congress may soon finalize the 2012 Farm Bill, and that hefty document should concern all of us in Maryland - especially when it comes to clean water. As we all know, the Chesapeake Bay is the nation's largest and most productive estuary. However, the bay is threatened by pollution from its major tributaries, including fertilizer-laden waters from farmlands. Each summer, nutrient runoff leads to algal growth, resulting in oxygen depletion as the algae decays. The loss of dissolved oxygen causes more than a third of the Chesapeake Bay to become a "dead zone.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2012
Just as they do every April, the fruit orchards at Larriland Farm have donned their spring finery. The plum trees at the pick-your-own place in western Howard County sport brilliant white blossoms, while the peach trees are decked out in bright pink. Thing is, it's still March. Spring came early to Maryland, thanks to a run of unusually warm weather that awakened flowers, trees, birds and bees weeks ahead of schedule across much of the eastern United States. Larriland's fruit trees are flowering about a month earlier than usual, according to Lynn Moore, president of the family-run fruit and produce farm in Woodbine.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1999
State tobacco farmers were celebrating a legislative victory yesterday that they say will go a long way toward stabilizing the Southern Maryland agriculture economy."
EXPLORE
By Lisa Aireythewinekey@aol.com | November 24, 2011
Every family celebrates Thanksgiving differently. Some focus on the founding of our nation while others reflect upon their personal blessings, but for almost everyone the celebrating revolves around food and drink. In today's modern and fast-paced economy, there is a huge gap between the producers and the end-users of any product. Children do not know that beef comes from cows. Supermarket cashiers can't identify the vegetables they ring up on the register. Consumers, no longer tied to the land, don't take the time to stop and reflect upon the year's worth of labor that went into harvesting a crop whether it be grapes or grain.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | November 3, 2011
"The harvest is plentiful but the workers are few. " -- Matthew 9:37 Good news. The jobs crisis is over. You read that correctly. There is plenty work available for downsized, furloughed and involuntarily separated laborers whose inability to land jobs in a rugged economy has driven the unemployment rate past 9 percent. You probably didn't hear about it in your lamestream media, but the problem has indeed been solved -- and it didn't take some fancy pants economic stimulus package to get 'er done, either.
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